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07-21-15 CC Agenda Packet (entire) AGENDA Regular Meeting of the City Council Golden Valley City Hall 7800 Golden Valley Road Council Chamber July 21, 2015 6:30 pm The Council may consider item numbers 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6 prior to the public hearings scheduled at 7 pm 1. CALL TO ORDER PAGES A. Roll Call B. Pledge of Allegiance C. Recognition of Service - Tom Burt - Northwest Community Television Board of 3 Directors D. 2015 Photo Contest Awards 4-5 2. ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS TO AGENDA 3. CONSENT AGENDA Approval of Consent Agenda - All items listed under this heading are considered to be routine by the City Council and will be enacted by one motion. There will be no discussion of these items unless a Council Member or citizen so requests in which event the item will be removed from the general order of business and considered in its normal sequence on the agenda. A. Approval of Minutes 1. Special Council/Manger Meeting - July 7, 2015 6 2. City Council Meeting - July 7, 2015 7-12 B. Approval of Check Register 1. City 13 2. Housing and Redevelopment Authority 14 C. Licenses: 1. Gambling License Exemption and Waiver of Notice Requirement - Cancer 15-17 Legal Line D. Minutes of Boards and Commissions: 1. Human Services Fund - June 8, 2015 18-19 2. Joint Water Commission - April 2, 2015 20-21 3. Tri-City Council Meeting - March 31, 2015 22-26 4. Bassett Creek Watershed Management Commission - May 21, 2015 27-33 E. Approve Requests for Beer and/or Wine at Brookview Park 34-35 F. Authorize Agreement with WSB, Inc. for Professional Services for Pond & Wetland Assessment 36-41 G. Second Consideration - Ordinance #563 - Amendment to City Code Regarding the Golden Valley Property Maintenance Code 42-51 H. Second Consideration - Ordinance #564 - Amendment to City Code Regarding 52-65 Licensing of Rental Housing I. Second Consideration - Ordinance #565 - Amendment to City Code Regarding 66-78 Administrative Citations J. Second Consideration - Ordinance #566 - Mobile Food Vending and Administrative Citation Fee Schedule 79-82 3. CONSENT - continued K. Approval of Plat - Sweeney Lake Woods PUD No. 120 and Authorization to Sign PUD Permit and PUD Development Agreement 15-63 83-98 L. City Hall Lower Level Remodel Professional Service Agreement 99-105 M. Receive and file the Liberty Crossing Redevelopment Project Update 106 N. Receive and file the Cornerstone Creek Redevelopment Project Update 107 O. Resolution withdrawal of inembership from Northwest Hennepin Human Services Council 15-64 108-126 P. Receipt June 2015 Financial Reports 127-135 Q. Authorization to Sign Agreement with Sojourner Project Inc. for pomestic Assault Intervention Services 136-139 R. Adopt 2016-2018 Strategic Plan Summary Report 140-181 4. PUBLIC HEARINGS 7 PM A. Continued Public Hearing - Ordinance #567 - Amending Chapter 11: Land use Regulation regarding Cocktail Rooms, Distilleries and Micro-Distilleries 182-204 B. Continued Public Hearing - Ordinance #562 - Amending Section 11.04 Temporary Uses regarding Mobile Food Vendors 205-228 C. Public Hearing - Ordinance #568 - Final PUD Plan for Golden Villas PUD No. 118 - 9130 and 9220 Olson Memorial Highway - Golden Villas, LLC, Applicant 229-280 D. Public Hearing - Ordinance #569 - Final PUD Plan for Liberty Crossing PUD No. 123 7751-7775 Medicine Lake Road, 2430 and 2480 Winnetka Avenue North, 2485 Rhode Island Avenue North - Intuitive Investments, Applicant 281-355 5. OLD BUSINESS 6. NEW BUSINESS A. METRO Blue Line Update - Receipt of Station Area Planning Final Report 356-450 B. First Consideration - Ordinance #572 - Eliminating Section 6.41 Food Establishment and Vending Machine Regulations 451-458 C. First Consideration - Ordinance #570 - Amending Chapter 5: Alcoholic Beverages Licensing regarding On-Sale Cocktail Rooms and Off-Sale Distilled Spirits License 459-471 D. First Consideration - Ordinance #571 - Amending the 2015 Master Fee Schedule for New Liquor License Fees 472-473 E. Announcements of Meetings F. Mayor and Council Communications 1. Traffic Impact on Highway 55 474-475 7. ADJOURNMENT ,+'Y V$f ('/� ��,�f?:.. �.y".,�^_ J� � / �l e�"2 �. Cit Administration Council ��.. ��/� y / 763 593 3991 /763 593 8109(fax) �-�.������; .., . . � ������ ..._, _ � r_�.��_...��.;�. ���.�t:_>�. &°���aa� �� Executive Summary For Action Golden Valley City Council Meeting July 21, 2015 Agenda Item 1. C. Recognition of Service - Tom Burt- Northwest Community Television Board of Directors Prepared By Judy Nally, Administrative Assistant Summary Mike Johnson, Executive Director and General Manager, Northwest Community Television and Northwest Cable Communications Commissior� will be at the meeting to present Tom Burt with a plaque recognizing him for his service on the Northwest Community Television Board of Directors. Northwest Community Television is a 501-C3 Non-profit organization that was formed in the early 1980's by the Northwest Suburbs Cable Communications Commission which is a Joint Powers Organization of nine municipalities in the northwest suburbs. The cities include: Brooklyn Center, Brooklyn Park, Crystal, Golden Valley, Maple Grove, New Hope, Osseo, Plymouth and Robbinsdale. c:i�yc�f , �� City Administration/Council 763 593 8003/763 593 8109(fax) Executive Summary For Action Golden Valley City Council Meeting July 21, 2015 Agenda Item 1. D. Photo Contest Awards Prepared By Cheryl Weiler, Communications Manager Summary Golden Valley's 23rd annual Views of the Valley photo contest drew 67 entries from residents who tried to capture on film their version of the city's beauty, uniqueness, and quality of life. The "Natural Golden Valley" category featured photos of landscapes, flora, fauna, etc. The "Golden Valley Lifestyle" category featured photos of cityscapes, buildings, people, and activities. The "Enhanced" category featured photos significantly altered by editing software. Following these standards as well as the basics of good photography, four judges chose the following entries as winners. All winners certificates of recognition and publication of their photos in various City public information pieces. Top winners in each category also receive a cash prize. Natural Golden Valley • Honorable Mention: "Symbiosis," a close-up of a butterfly on a flower, by Sonia Mohammadzadah. • Honorable Mention: "Awesome Ice-Covered Leaves," (self-explanatory), by Janice Laulainen. • First Place ($50) and Overall Grand Prize ($50): "Vibrant Petals," an extreme close-up of water droplets on flower petals, by Anna Wuollet. Enhanced Golden Valley • Honorable Mention: "Tree Face," a mirrored image of a tree against a moonlit sky, by Kalin Kauppila. • Honorable Mention: "It's a Bird! It's a Plane!" featuring a child in a cape looking skwyard against a black-and-white park backdrop, by Kalin Kauppila. • First Place ($50): "Heartlines," featuring a hand double-exposed over birch trees against a bright blue sky, by Grace O'Neil. Golden Valley lifestyle • Honorable Mention: "Turn, Turn,Turn!" a shot of a lawn bowler in action, by Stan Waldhauser. • Honorable Mention: "A Sweet Treet," a close-up of two kids eating cupcakes, by Anna Wuollet. • First Place ($50): "Strumming," a close-up of hands playing a guitar, by Sonia Gretchen Mathiason. People's Choice "Awesome Ice-Covered Leaves," by Janice Laulainen. This $25 prize is awarded to the winner in public ballot box and online voting. Views of the Valley aims to promote Golden Valley and civic pride. Judges for 2015 were Dennis Zerwas Jr, a professional photographer (dzpics.com); Nicole Pribbenow, City of St Louis Park communications coordinator; Kaylin Eidsness, City of Edina senior communications coordinator; and Kara Trygestad, City of Brooklyn Park graphic designer and web coordinator. Next year's contest deadline will be June 10, 2016. Recommended Action Display winning photos and present certificates and cash prizes to winners. � , �� ` 4 � � a - g UNOFFICIAL MINUTES � � '� g$ � ��� �' SPECIAL COUNCIL/MANAGER MEETING � �m5 �. ��_ k,: � COUNCIL CONFERENCE ROOM GOLDEN VALLEY, MINNESOTA JULY 7, 2015 1. CALL TO ORDER Mayor Harris called the meeting to order at 5:30 pm. 1 A. Roll Call Present: Mayor Harris, Council Members Clausen, Fonnest, Harris, Schmidgall and Snope. Also present were: City Manager Burt, Director of Parks and Recreation Birno, Golf Operations Manager Disch and City Clerk Luedke 1 B. Brookview Community Center Replacement Director of Parks & Recreation Birno presented the staff report and answered questions from the Council. City Manager Burt, Golf Operations Manager Disch and Finance Director Virnig answered questions from Council. Mr. Glenn Waguespack from Hammel, Green and Abrahamson (HGA), presented the initial predesign conceptual plan and estimated budget of the Brookview Community Center replacement and answered questions from Council. Council discussed the proposed Brookview Community Center Replacement plan and the Community Center Replacement Open Houses that are scheduled for Wednesday, July 15, 2015, and Monday, July 20, 2015 from 6 - 7:30 pm at the Community Center. The meeting was adjourned at 6.22 pm. Shepard M. Harris, Mayor ATTEST: Kristine A. Luedke, City Clerk �����'' ''' �:������ - UNOFFICIAL MINUTES ` '� ° � � CITY COUNCIL MEETING . t �.� & s .' 4 �" GOLDEN VALLEY, MINNESOTA �w c..�, ���,.� y July 7, 2015 1. CALL TO ORDER Mayor Harris called the meeting to order at 6:30 pm. 1A. Roll Call Present: Mayor Harris, Council Members Clausen, Fonnest, Schmidgall and Snope. Also present were: City Manager Burt, Acting City Attorney Garry and City Clerk Luedke. 1 B. Pledge of Allegiance 2. ADD/T/ONS AND CORRECT/ONS TO AGENDA MOTION made by Council Member Fonnest, seconded by Council Member Snope to approve the agenda of July 7, 2015, as submitted and the motion carried. 3. APPROVAL OF CONSENT AGENDA MOTION made by Council Member Snope, seconded by Council Member Fonnest to approve the consent agenda of July 7, 2015, as revised: removal of 3E1-Award contract for the Schaper Pond Diversion Project, 3H-Accept donation from Golden Valley Federated Women's Club and 31-Authorize Statement of Work for Power Line Burial on the Douglas Drive Corridor Reconstruction Project and the motion carried. 3A1. Approve Minutes of the Special Council/Manager Meeting of June 16, 2015 3A2. Approve Minutes of the City Council Meeting of June 16, 2015 3A3. Approve Minutes of the Special Council/Manager Meeting of June 29, 2015 3A4. Approve Minutes of the Council/Manager Meeting of June 9, 2015 3B1. Approve City Check Register and authorize the payments of the bills as submitted. 3B2. Approve Housing and Redevelopment Authority Check Register and authorize the payments of the bills as submitted. 3C1. Approve solicitor's license for LTO Enterprises Inc. d/b/a Approved Exteriors. 3C2. Receive and file the gambling license exemption and approve the waiver of notice requirement for Edina Rotary Foundation. 3D. Accept for filing the Minutes of Boards and Commissions as follows: 1. Planning Commission - June 8, 2015 2. Board of Zoning Appeals - May 20, 2015 3. Human Rights Commission - May 26, 2015 4. Joint Water Commission - March 12, 2015 5. Bassett Creek Watershed Management Commission - April 16, 2015 , , . , . 3E2. Award Contract for the Fire Alarm System Monitoring Project to the lowest responsible bidders, Life Safety Systems, in the amount of$20,595. 3E3. Award Contract for the 2015 Sandburg Learning Center Athletic Field Irrigation Installation Project No. 15-18A to the lowest responsible bidder, Aqua Engineering, Inc. in the amount of$117,291. 3E4. Award Contract for the 2015 Sandburg Learning Center Athletic Field Fencing Installation Project No. 15-18B to the lowest responsible bidder, Fenc-co in the amount of $154,598. Unofficial City Council Minutes -2- July 7, 2015 3. APPROVAL OF CONSENT AGENDA - continued 3F. Approve requests for beer and/or wine at Brookview Park as recommended by staff. 3G. Authorize agreement with WSB & Associates, Inc. in the amount not to exceed $141,212 for final design and construction administration services for the Honeywell Pond Project No. 14-20. . , , 31. Authorize City Manager to sign the Statement of Work requested between the City of Golden Valley and Xcel Energy. 3J. Authorize the Mayor and City Manager to sign the School Resource Officer Service Agreement with Independent School District 281. 3K. Receive and file Notice of Metropolitan Council Action regarding the General Land Use Plan, Comprehensive Plan Amendment for 9000 and 9050 Golden Valley Road. 3. ITEMS REMOVED FROM THE CONSENT AGENDA 3E1. Award Contract for the Schaper Pond Diversion Project to the lowest responsible bidder, Sunram Construction, Inc. in the amount of$112,455. Council Member Fonnest gave an overview of the Schaper Pond Diversion project. MOTION made by Council Member Fonnest, seconded by Council Member Snope to award a contract for the Schaper Pond Diversion Project to the lowest responsible bidder, Sunram Construction, Inc. in the amount of$112,455 and the motion carried. 3H. Adopt Resolution 15-60, accepting Donation from the Golden Valley Federated Women's Club for the Summer Concert Series. Council Member Clausen thanked the Golden Valley Federated Women's Club for their donation to support the Summer Concert Series. MOTION made by Council Member Clausen, seconded by Council Member Schmidgall to adopt Resolution 15-60, accepting a donation from the Golden Valley Federated Women's Club for the Summer Concert Series upon a vote being taken the following voted in favor: Harris, Snope, Schmidgall, Fonnest and Clausen; and the following voted against: none and the motion carried. 31. Authorize City Manager to sign the Statement of Work requested between the City of Golden Valley and Xcel Energy. Physical Development Director Nevinski answered questions from the Council. MOTION made by Council Member Snope, seconded by Council Member Fonnest to authorize the City Manager to sign the Statement of Work requested between the City of Golden Valley and Xcel Energy and the motion carried. 4. PUBLIC HEAR/NGS 4A. Public Hearing to Vacate Easement at 6161 Golden Valley Road Physical Development Director Nevinski presented the staff report. Unofficial City Council Minutes -3- July 7, 2015 4A. Public Hearing Vacate Easement at 6161 Golden Valley Road - continued Mayor Harris opened the public hearing. No one came forward. Mayor Harris closed the public hearing. MOTION made by Council Member Schmidgall, seconded by Council Member Fonnest to adopt Resolution 15-61, Vacating Easement at 6161 Golden Valley Road upon a vote being taken the following voted in favor: Clausen, Fonnest, Harris, Schmidgall and Snope; and the following voted against: none, and the motion carried. 4B. Public Hearing - Ordinance #562 - Amending Section 11.04 Temporary Uses regarding Mobile Food Vendors Associate Planner Goellner presented the staff report and answered questions from Council. Mayor Harris opened the public hearing. No one came forward. There was Council discussion regarding amending the City Code regarding Mobite Food Vendors. Council directed staff to provide additional information at the next Council MOTION made by Council Member Fonnest, seconded by Council Member Clausen to continue the public hearing to the July 21, 2015, City Council Meeting and the motion carried. 4C. Continue Public Hearing - Amending Chapter 11: Land Use Regulation (Zoning) regarding Cocktail Rooms, Distilleries, and Micro-Distilleries Associate Planner Goellner presented the staff report. Mayor Harris opened the public hearing. No one came forward. MOTION made by Councif Member Clausen, seconded by Council Member Fonnest to continue the public hearing to the July 21, 2015, City Council Meeting and the motion carried. 6. NEW BUSINESS 6A. First Consideration -Amendment to City Code Regarding the Golden Valley Property Maintenance Code Fire Chief Crelly presented the staff report and answered questions from the Council. Acting City Attorney Garry and City Manager Burt answered questions from Council. There was Council discussion regarding the proposed amendments to the City Code regarding the Golden Valley Property Maintenance Code. Council directed staff to better define the role and explain the selection process for the Administrative Hearing Officers and to review section 6.04 Electrical Facilities to consider adding a reference to the Minnesota Electrical Code. � MOTION made by Council Member Clausen, seconded by Council Member Snope to adopt first consideration, Ordinance #563, amending City Code regarding the Golden Valley Property Maintenance Code upon a vote being taken the following voted in favor: Clausen, Fonnest, Harris, Schmidgall and Snope; and the following voted against: none, and the motion carried. Unofficial City Council Minutes -4- July 7, 2015 6B. First Consideration - Amendment to City Code Regarding Licensing of Rental Housing Fire Chief Crelly presented the staff report and answered questions from the Council. Acting City Attorney Garry answered questions from Council. MOTION made by Council Member Snope, seconded by Council Member Clausen to adopt first consideration, Ordinance #564, amending Chapter 6 regarding Licensing of Rental Housing upon a vote being taken the following voted in favor: Clausen, Fonnest, Harris, Schmidgall and Snope; and the following voted against: none, and the motion carried. 6C. First Consideration - Amendment to City Code Regarding Administrative Citations Fire Chief Crelly presented the staff report and answered questions from the Council. MOTION made by Council Member Fonnest, seconded by Council Member Clausen to adopt first consideration, Ordinance #565, amending the City Code regarding Administrative Citations upon a vote being taken the following voted in favor: Clausen, Fonnest, Harris, Schmidgall and Snope; and the following voted against: none, and the motion carried. 6D. First Consideration - Amendment to the 2015 Master Fee Schedule for Administrative Fines, Citations and Term on length for Mobile Food Vending Finance Director Virnig presented the staff report and answered questions from Council. City Manager Burt answered questions from Council. MOTION made by Council Member Schmidgall, seconded by Council Member Clausen to adopt first consideration, Ordinance #566, amending the 2015 Master Fee Schedule by adopting Penalties for Administrative Fines and Citation, and length for Mobile Food Vending as amended upon a vote being taken the following voted in favor: Clausen, Fonnest, Harris, Schmidgall and Snope; and the following voted against: none, and the motion carried. 6E. Approval of Plat - Golden Valley CenterPoint Addition P.U.D. No. 122 Associate Planner Goellner presented the staff report and answered questions from Council. MOTION made by Council Member Snope, seconded by Council Member Clausen to adopt Resolution 15-62, Approval of Plat - Golden Valley CenterPoint Addition P.U.D. No. 122 upon a vote being taken the following voted in favor: Clausen, Fonnest, Harris, Schmidgall and Snope; and the following voted against: none, and the motion carried. 6F. Announcement of Meetings Some Council Members may attend the Golden Valley Golf and Lawn Bowling Classic on July 10, 2015, from 8 am to 3 pm at Brookview Golf Course. The second Water Day will be held on July 10, 2015, from 12:30 - 2:15 pm at Scheid Park. Some Council Members may attend the Market in the Valley on July 12, 2015, from 9 am to 1 pm in the City Hall Campus Parking Lot. Unofficial City Council Minutes -5- July 7, 2015 6F. Announcement of Meetings - continued Some Council Members may attend the Ice Cream Social and Concert in the Park featuring the John Sousa Band on July 13, 2015, at 7 pm at Brookview Park. The next Housing and Redevelopment Authority Meeting will be held on July 14, 2015, at 6:30 pm in the Council Chambers. The next Council/Manager Meeting will be held on July 14, 2015, immediately following the HRA meeting in the Council Conference Room. Some Council Members may attend the Brookview Community Center Replacement Community Input Open House on July 15, 2015, from 6 to 7:30 pm at Brookview Community Center. Some Council Members may attend the Market in the Valley on July 19, 2015, from 9 am to 1 pm in the City Hall Campus Parking Lot. Some Council Members may attend the Senior Ice Cream Social featuring Chillin' with BandanAhh on July 20, 2015, at 1 pm at Brookview Community Center. A Concert in the Park featuring The Banjo Boys Variety Band will be held on July 20, 2015, at 7 pm at Brookview Park. Some Council Members may attend the Brookview Community Center Replacement Community Input Open House on July 20, 2015, from 6 to 7:30 pm at Brookview Community Center. The next Coffee with a Cop event will be held on July 21, 2015, from 8:30 - 10:30 am at Calvary Cooperative located at 7600 Golden Valley Road. The next City Council Meeting will be held on July 21, 2015, at 6:30 pm. Some Council Members may attend the Golden Valley Business Council event on July 23, 2015, from 8 to 9:30 am at Second Harvest Heartland at 6325 Sandburg Road. Some Council Members may attend the City Manager Finalist Open House to be held on July 23, 2015, from 6:30 to 8 pm in the Council Conference Room. 6G. Mayor and Council Communication Council Member Snope stated the Sweeney Lake parade has been postponed and that he would not be in attendance at the July 21, 2015, City Council meeting. Council Member Fonnest attended the League of Minnesota Cities Conference. He stated a new company from Golden Valley, called Prefurbia was introduced at the conference. Council gave an updated on the new City Manager Search and stated that a City Manager Open House will be held on July 22, 2015, from 6:30 - 8 pm and then the Council and Management team will be interviewing the finalists on July 23, 2015. City Manager Burt reviewed the Council/Manager meeting agenda for July 14, 2015. Unofficial City Council Minutes -6- July 7, 2015 6G. Mayor and Council Communication - continued Mayor Harris updated Council on a meeting he attended with the Calvary Co-op Apartments and thanked staff for meeting with the residents of the DeCola Ponds Neighborhood. Council Member Clausen updated Council on the Sochacki Park Kick-off event she attended. Physical Development Director Nevinski updated Council on the upcoming traffic and lighting issues in Golden Valley. 7. ADJOURMENT MOTION made by Council Member Snope, seconded by Council Member Clausen and the motion carried to adjourn the meeting at 8:27 pm. Shepard Harris, Mayor ATTEST: Kristine A. Luedke, City Clerk C l��1 t�� ��� �t �� Administrative Services De artment ��. ��� - - - - p 763 593 8013/763 593 3969(fax) Executive Summary For Action Golden Valley City Council Meeting July 21, 2015 Agenda Item 3. B. 1. Approval of City Check Register Prepared By Sue Virnig, Finance Director Summary Approval of the check register for various vendor claims against the City of Golden Valley. Attachments • Document sent via email Recommended Action Motion to authorize the payment of the bills as submitted. C1�� L�� �<� _ ���� ��. Administrative Services De artment V�.. ��T - - - - p 763 593 8013!763 593 3969(fax) Executive Summary For Action Golden Valley City Council Meeting July 21, 2015 Agenda Item 3. B. 2. Approval of Housing and Redevelopment Authority Check Register Prepared By Sue Virnig, Finance Director Summary Approval of the check register for various vendor claims against the Housing and Redevelopment Authority. Attachments • Document sent via email Recommended Action Motion to authorize the payment of the bills as submitted. Ct��1 C)� °� ��''�: �� �������� ����� �� ��� �� ���� � ����� �� ��� �� Cit Administration Council �T�.. ��T -y - - - � 763 593 3991 /763 593 8109(fax) =;� ..-: _ .:. ;. ; ..,:.a���r.�.�;�s�°.���HH��ii�r�����i�w��'��4�u�,�_M,��s... �, �, �..:£...�o-. � = ����:��i�' �i � �;. Executive Summary For Action Golden Valley City Council Meeting July 21, 2015 Agenda Item 3. C. 1. Gambling License Exemption and Waiver of Notice Requirement - Cancer Legal Line Prepared By Judy Nally, Administrative Assistant Summary As per State Statute organizations that conduct gambling within the City limits have to submit an application for a lawful gambling permit to the State after the permit has been approved or denied by the City. Depending upon the timing of the permit the applicants may request the City to waive the 30-day waiting period. Attachments • Application for Exempt Permit (2 pages) Recommended Action Motion to receive and file the gambling license exemption and approve the waiver of notice requirement for Cancer Legal Line. MINNESOTA LAWFUL GAMBLING 5/15 LG220 Application for Exempt Permit Page 1 of 2 An exempt permit may be issued to a nonprofit Application Fee (non-refundable) organization that: Applications are processed in the order received. If the application . conducts lawful gambling on five or fewer days, and is postmarked or received 30 days or more before the event,the . awards less than $50,000 in prizes during a calendar application fee is�100; otherwise the fee is ;150. yea r. If total raffle prize value for the calendar year will be Due to the high volume of exempt applications, payment of $1,500 or less, contact the Licensing Specialist assigned to additional fees prior to 30 days before your event will not expedite your county by calling 651-539-1900. service, nor are telephone requests for expedited service accepted. ORGANIZATION INFORMATION Name ization /��� L��1 ��� '• � 1 ,�� Previous Gambling v G) -� o� C,2� _�y�,a �••' �� ��� ��+ Permit Number: !� � � U Minnesota Tax ID �S��S��� y� ��.� Federal Employer ID � Number, if any: '�''"`I�' Number(FEIN), if any: L-�G���`�UZ , Mailing � � �U C 1��5l.-+ � �L-c.���-e ��� Address: �.fi �y� � � S�1 U� t,,; r?.r��-e-�-1 ��tY� �� �""" State� � Zip: Coun Name of Chief Executive Officer(CEO): 1-1 �C�� �0 ���f't d��i�\ Daytime Phone: �S � � I � � c��� Email: v<<�L` U ��'�L�� �-t �--+r� . a( NONPROFIT STATUS �Ty e of Nonprofit Organization (check one): Fraternal � Religious � Veterans �Other Nonprofit Organization Attach a copy of one of the following showing proof of nonprofit status: (DO NOT attach a sales tax exempt status or federal employer ID number, as they are not proof of nonprofit status.) aA current calendar year Certificate of Good Standing Don't have a copy? Obtain this certificate from: MN Secretary of State, Business Services Division Secretary of State website, phone numbers: 60 Empire Drive, Suite 100 - www.sos.state.mn.us St. Paul, MN 55103 651-296-2803, or toll free 1-877-551-6767 IRS income tax exemption (501(c)) letter in you�organization's name Don't have a copy? To obtain a copy of your federal income tax exempt letter, have an organization officer contact the IRS toll free at 1-877-829-5500. � IRS -Affiliate of national, statewide,or internationai parent nonprofit organization (charter) If your organization falls under a parent organization, attach copies of both of the following: 1. IRS letter showing your parent organization is a nonprofit 501(c)organization with a group ruling,and 2. the charter or letter from your parent organization recognizing your organization as a subordinate. GAMBLING PREMISES INFORMATION Name of premises where the gambling event will be conducted ��,� � ��2�,` ��`�� (for raffles, list the site where the drawing will take place): � �YL"� ' Address (do not use P.O. box): � � + �/ ���-�ZG�I-'� ��%'ti-�'� Tow ship: �� `�+ �(J�-e-r��Gi-��2�1 '�1�� Zip: �jJ �f� �..� County: __ ��'.('1���, � Date(s)of activity (for raffles, ��� ��,f ( 0 � �� �� indicate the date of the drawing): Check each type of gambling activity that your organization will conduct: �Bingo* �Paddlewheels* �Puli-Tabs* aTipboards* Raffle (total value of raffle prizes awarded for the calendar year: $ Z�� � � * Gambling equipment for bingo paper, paddlewheets, pull-tabs,and tipboards must be obtained from a distributor licensed by the Minnesota Gambling Control Board. EXCEPTION: Bingo hard cards and bingo number selection devices may be borrowed from another organization authorized to conduct bingo. To find a licensed distributor,go to www.mn.gov/gcb and click on Ofstrfbutors under LIST OF LICENSEES, or cali 651-539-1900. LG220 Application for Exempt Permit 5�15 Page 2 of 2 LOCAL UNIT OF GOVERNMENT ACKNOWLEDGMENT (required before submitting application to the Minnesota Gambling Control Board) CITY APPROVAL COUNTY APPROVAL for a gambiing premises for a gambling premises located within city limits located in a township �The application is acknowledged with no waiting period. The application is acknowledged with no waiting period. The application is acknowledged with a 30-day waiting The application is acknowledged with a 30-day waiting period, and allows the Board to issue a permit after 30 days period, and allows the Board to issue a permit after (60 days for a lst class city). 30 days. The application is denied. The application is denied. Print City Name: �`(/�� V�l�� Print County Name: Sign of C' y Per onnel: Signature of County Personnel: Title: Date: �l� � Title: Date: TOWNSHIP (if required by the county) On behalf of the township, I acknowledge that the organization is applying for exempted gambling activity within the township The city or county must sign before limits. (A township has no statutory authority to approve or submitting application to the deny an application, per Minn. Statutes, section 349.213.) Gambling Control Board. Print Township Name: Signature of Township Officer: Title: Date: CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER'S SIGNATURE (required The information provided in this application is co e e a cc rate to best y knowledge. a nowledge that the financiai report will be completed and returned to the Board w ' 30 ys e eve date. Chief Executive Officer's Signature: Date: � �^ �� (Signature must e CEO's signatu ; d Ignee may n ign) Print Name: ����� �'� ��A-n�1G-�� REQUIREMENTS MAIL APPLICATION AND ATTACHMENTS Complete a separate application for: Mail a plication with: • all gambling conducted on two or more consecutive days, or ��opy of your proof of nonprofit status, and • all gambling conducted on one day. Only one application is required if one or more raffle drawings are ✓application fee(non-refundable). If the application is conducted on the same day. postmarked or received 30 days or more before the event, the application fee is;100; otherwise the fee is;150. Financfal report to be completed within 30 days after the Make check payable to State of Minnesota. gambling activity is done: To: Gambling Control Board A financial report form will be mailed with your permit. Complete 1711 West County Road B, Suite 300 South and return the financial report form to the Gambling Control Roseville, MN 55113 Board. Your organization must keep all exempt records and reports for Questions? Call the Licensing Section of the Gambling Control Board at 3-1/2 years (Minn. Statutes, section 349.166, subd. 2(f)). 651-539-1900. Data privacy notice: The information requested application. Your organization's name and ment of Public Safety;Attorney General; on this form(and any attachments)will be used address will be pubiic informatlon when received Commissioners of Adminlstration, Minnesota by the Gambling Control Board(Board)to by the Board. All other information provided will Management&Budget,and Revenue; Legislative determfne your organization's qualifications to be private data about your organizatfon until the Auditor,national and International gambling be involved in lawful gambling activitfes in Board issues the permit. When the Board issues regulatory agencies;anyone pursuant to court Minnesota. Your organization has the right to the permit, all Information provided will become order;other individuals and agencles specifically refuse to supply the information; however, if pub�ic. If the Board does not issue a permit,al) authorized by state or federal law to have access your organization refuses to supply this fnformatfon provided remalns private,with the to the Information; individuals and agencies for information,the Board may not be able to exceptfon of your organization's name and which law or legal order authorizes a new use or determine your organization's qualifications and, address which will remain pubHc. Private data sharing of tnformation after this notice was as a consequence, may refuse to issue a permit. about your organization are available to Board given;and anyone with your written consent. If your organization supplies the information members,Board staff whose work requires requested,the Board will be able to process the access to the information; Minnesota's Depart- This form will be made availabie in alternative format (i.e. large print, braille) upon request. Golden Valley Human Services Fund (GVHSF) Meeting Minutes June 8, 2015 Present: Hilmer Erickson, Kathryn Frommer, Alan Ingber, Andrea Mac Arthur, Toots Vodovoz, Peggy Watkins and Andrew Wold. Also present: Jeanne Fackler, Staff Liaison. Not Attending: Denise La Mere-Anderson, Elissa Heilicher, Alan Ingber, and Jennifer Rudolph. Call to Order: Wold called the meeting to order at 6:46 p.m. Agenda Changes or Additions: No changes or additions to the agenda. May 11 Minutes: Erickson moved and Frommer seconded the motion to approve the corrected minutes from May 11. Correction is as follows: By-Laws Article IV, number 2: The GVHSF will elect officers at the May meeting each year. Officers will serve until the next election. Terms of office shall be for a maximum of two years and shall rotate. The Chair and Vice-Chair shall not serve consecutive terms. The motion passed unanimously. Upcoming Events: Golf Classic and Lawn Bowling Event — Friday July 10 Cost of Venue: The cost of the lawn bowling facility is $100 for four rinks/$200 for eight rinks, and $25/hour for an official. Sponsors: Letters have been sent to last year's sponsors. No responses as of today. Door prize solicitation: Members volunteered to contact businesses for prizes for the tournaments. Food/Beverages: Als' Coffee has donated water for the event. Wold has talked to New Bohemia about possibly supplying lunch for the event. The cost would be @ $8/person. Davanni's cost is @ $6.50/person. Wold will continue talks with New Bohemia. PR/Marketing: Fackler asked for assistance in promoting the event. Communications is working on the Lawn Bowling brochure and will have them ready for distribution this week. Fees: The fee for golf sponsorships and golfers will remain the same ($1,000-corporate sponsor, $500-hole sponsor, and $300 for a foursome). A fee of $100 per lawn bowling team of four was discussed. The fee will include lunch, soft drinks, and prizes. Lawn Bowling: Possible sponsors for Lawn Bowling were discussed. A fee of $500 should cover the cost of the event. Run the Valley date: Run the Valley will be held on Saturday, April 16, 2016. Other Business: Disc Golf Tournament: Wold discussed options for the disc golf tournament. Fackler reported Crystal Recreation would charge $60 for use of the facility. Wold will contact "Gotta Go Gotta Throw" for information on running the event. The Board and Commission Dinner is set for Wednesday, June 10 at Brookview. Members and significant others are invited to attend. Application packet.� Packet was approved and will be sent to Communications to post on the city website. Golden Valley Arts and Music Festival asked if the group would like to have a table at the Festival on September 26. The members decided the Festival would be a good way to promote the GVHSF and their events. Fackler will send the application to the Community Foundation. Member Update: Connie Sandler has submitted her resignation from the Commission. Adjournment: Erickson moved to adjourn the meeting, Vodovoz seconded the motion. The meeting was adjourned at 7:40 p.m. RespectFully submitted, Andrew Wold, GVHSF Chair Jeanne Fackler, Staff Liaison JOINT WATER COMMISSION MINUTES Golden Valley - Crystal - New Hope Meeting of April 2, 2015 � The Golden Valley— Crystal — New Hope Joint Water Commission (JWC) meeting was called to order at 10:08 a.m. in the City of Golden Valley Council Conference Room. Commissioners Present Tom Burt, City Manager, Golden Valley Anne Norris, City Manager, Crystal Kirk McDonald, City Manager, New Hope Staff Present Mark Ray, Director of Public Works/City Engineer, Crystal Bob Paschke, Director of Public Works, New Hope Chris Long, City Engineer, New Hope Marc Nevinski, Physical Development Director Sue Virnig, Finance Director, Golden Valley Jeff Oliver, City Engineer, Golden Valley Pat Schutrop, Administrative Assistant, Golden Valley Minutes of March 12, 2015 Meetinq The bid amount of $1,524,900 as recorded in the minutes for the JWC Emergency Supply Pumps/Piping/Electrical/Chemical project award to Municipal Builders should be corrected to read $1,514,900 (includes a $10,000 deduct for using a Goulds vertical turbine pump). MOVED by McDonald and seconded by Norris to approve the minutes of the March 12, 2015 meeting as amended. Motion carried. 36-Inch Watermain Emerqencv Repair and Emerqencv Backup Water Supply Proiect Update Bids were received on March 26, 2015, for the east end of the JWC 36-inch PCCP replacement/repair project-Minneapolis connection. The following three bids were received: Geislinger & Sons, Inc. $190,942.00 Dave Perkins Contracting, Inc. $196,814.00 G.F. Jedlicki, Inc. $246,675.00 Bolton & Menk, Inc. recommends the project be awarded to the low bidder, Geislinger & Sons, Inc. MOVED by Norris and seconded by McDonald to award the contract to Geislinger & Sons, Inc. in the amount of $190,942 for the east end of the JWC 36-inch PCCP replacement/repair project-Minneapolis connection. Motion carried. Emerqencv Backup Water Supply Proiect Update Due to the immediate need to repair the 36-inch watermain line, the Golden Valley well will be delayed. Joint Water Commission April 2, 2015 Page 2 of 2 MOVED by Norris and seconded by McDonald to direct the Technical Advisory Committee to proceed and contact Traut Wells, Inc. and any other contractors associated with the project to discuss the delay and contract with JWC for the well. Motion carried. County Road 9 Proiect Update Mark Ray reported the contractor has started removals. Other Business None. Next Meeting The next meeting is scheduled far Wednesday, May 6, 2015, at 1:30 p.m. Adiournment Chair Burt adjourned the meeting at 10:12 a.m. Thomas D. Burt, Chair ATTEST: Pat Schutrop, Recording Secretary TRI-CITY COUNCIL MEETING MINUTES TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2015 CALL TO ORDER AND INTRODUCTIONS The Tri-City Council meeting convened at 6:02 p.m. on Tuesday, March 31, 2015 in the Council Chambers at the City of Golden Valley City Hall, 7800 Golden Valley, Minnesota. Golden Valley Mayor Shep Harris called the meeting to order and opened with introductions. ATTENDANCE Golden Valley Recording Secretary Pat Schutrop recorded the attendance as follows: CRYSTAL COUNCIL: Jim Adams, Mayor Laura Libby, Council Member Olga Parsons, Council Member Elizabeth Dahl, Council Member Jeff Kolb, Council Member Casey Peak, Council Member Julie Deshler, Council Member CRYSTAL STAFF: Anne Norris, City Manager Mark Ray, Director of Public Works/City Engineer Wayne Houle, Past Interim Director of Public Works/City Engineer Rand Kloe er, Water Su erintendent NEW HOPE Kathi Hemken, Mayor COUNCIL: John Elder, Council Member Andy Hoffe, Council Member Eric Lammle, Council Member Jonathan London, Council Member NEW HOPE STAFF: Kirk McDonald, City Manager Bob Paschke, Director of Public Works Bernie Weber, Operations Manager Dave Lemke, Utilities Su ervisor GOLDEN VALLEY Shep Harris, Mayor COUNCIL: Steve Schmidgall, Council Member Joanie Clausen, Council Member Larry Fonnest, Council Member And Sno e, Council Member GOLDEN VALLEY Tom Burt, City Manager STAFF: Marc Nevinski, Physical Development Director Sue Virnig, Finance Director Jeff Oliver, City Engineer Bert Tracy, Public Works Maintenance Manager Kelley Janes, Utilities Supervisor R.J. Kakach, Utility Engineer Pat Schutro , Recordin Secreta OTHERS: George Selman, Robbinsdale Council Member Marcia Glick, Robbinsdale City Manager Marcus Thomas, Bolton & Menk, Inc. Brian Simmons, Bolton & Menk, Inc. Tri-City Council Meeting Minutes March 31, 2015 Page 2 36-INCH WATERMAIN EMERGENCY REPAIR PROJECT Bolton & Menk discussed the methods and holistic approach to the emergency repair of the 36-inch watermain. Rehabilitation of the line will be done in segments and coordinated with Hennepin County and its County Road 9 project and the connection with the City of Minneapolis system. To minimize disruption of service and less above- ground surface disturbance, Bolton & Menk is recommending a loose-fit slip lining for the majority of the repair. There is a portion where the jack and bore method will be necessary located on County Road 81 where the Burlington Northern San Francisco Railroad line and future Bottineau LRT line is located and allow for future utility improvements for the Bottineau project. The portion of the rehabilitation project that connects to the water source in Minneapolis needs to be done before May 15 or after October 15 as required by the City of Minneapolis. Bolton & Menk projects this portion of the work will be completed before May 15 deadline. Substantial project completion is August 15, with final completion scheduled for September 21. Proiect Cost The estimate for the portion of the project for Minneapolis connection is $248,225. Because this portion of the project has a tight completion deadline and in order to meet the completion date of the entire project, bids for this connection have been published. The bids will be presented to the JWC for approval and award at its next meeting. The remaining portion of the replacement/repair of the 36-inch watermain is conservatively estimated to be $5,428,038 with an estimated total project cost to be $5,676,263. This does not include any costs to repair the Robbinsdale watermain. The estimated project cost breakdown of the three cities will be: Golden Valley-43%, Crystal-27%, and New Hope-30%. Golden Valley Mayor Harris added there is legislation pending where bonding dollars up to $7 million have been requested to potentially help pay for this work, including repairs to the Robbinsdale line. Mayor Harris and Golden Valley Council Member Snope will continue to be in contact with state legislators and should know the outcome in about a month. Robbinsdale Public Works Director Richard McCoy has been involved in the discussions regarding the 36-inch repair because the JWC is aware of issues in the Robbinsdale line and wanted to coordinate any efforts if possible. After initial discussions with the City of Robbinsdale, they have indicated they are not ready to make those repairs at this time; however, the JWC must proceed with rehabilitation of the 36-inch line to continue service to its customers this year. The time constraints involved in getting the portion of the repair completed on the Minneapolis connection necessitate the JWC to move ahead before the outcome of the bond bill is known. Any delays from a logistic standpoint, would result in delays in bringing the line back into service. Currently, the water line will be out of service during the summer. Tri-City Council Meeting Minutes March 31, 2015 Page 3 The emergency water supply wells is the backup water supply plan for the JWC. As a backup to the emergency backup supply plan, the JWC is looking at an interconnect with surrounding cities (Brooklyn Park and Robbinsdale's watermain) and the JWC currently has one connection to St. Louis Park. If there is a power outage, we have an emergency backup generator as emergency backup operation and that is monitored with a SCADA system. The Crystal reservoir has about 3 to 4 days backup water supply giving time to handle a short-term emergency situation with the distribution system. The system is currently set up to pump out of the Crystal reservoir during the day and do a water exchange during the evening to keep the water pressure steady. The JWC is looking to evaluating the entire system to examine the condition and identify repairs that may be necessary. It would be advantageous to rehabilitate the line from end to end. Draft Resolution Supporting Making Improvements to the 36-Inch Watermain Each city agreed it is imperative to move ahead with the emergency repair/replacement of the 36-inch watermain for service to the JWC. They will present the resolution at respective city council sessions for approval and each city will be responsible for their share of the cost. Communication and Conservation Plan Staff involved in developing the communications plan consisted of communications staff and the JWC Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) from the three cities. The communications in terms of typical construction impacts are routine in nature. Unique to this project is the education and awareness piece relative to water supply impacts and potential for implementing conservation efforts. The goal of this appropriate communication plan is to get communication out to the public ahead of an emergency and have plans for communications in the event of emergencies. The reason the JWC is doing the communication plan is because of the break history of the 36-inch line. Want to have more control over the communication rather than reactionary emergency situations. Three components will be included in the communications plan: project planning (happening in advance of the project), project construction (occurring during construction), and emergency project communications (dispatched in the event of a specific emergency). The focus group for the communication will largely be the affected property owners and those on the project corridor. Project planning will communicate upfront the project schedules, overatl project parameters, road closures, and other typical inconveniences due to the project, go-to people to contact. Advanced communications for project planning will include communication to the general overall customer population that the JWC serves. Educating them to what and how the system is working and what takes place to deliver water to their homes, introduce temporary water reduction due to the project or naturally. Tri-City Council Meeting Minutes March 31, 2015 Page 4 Project construction communications will be regular communications (approximately weekly depending on project progress and access). Will be daily informal communications occurring on a daily basis. Emergency project communications are related to possible water supply shortage. These are communications plans prepared in advance but will not be dispatched on an as-needed basis. Bolton & Menk has identified scenarios that could potentially cause a water shortage. Throughout the project, there will be a continuous monitoring of the water system. Hennepin County will be also working in this area and property owners will not differentiate the difference and we want to work together to coordinate communication efforts. The overall specifics are still being developed. Project updates for websites, media and social media releases, and potential blog. This will go through city managers and public works staff. Stage 1 will be educating with press releases and create talking points to communicate to property owners. If Stage 2 is necessary which will be a partial watering ban (during 11 am to 6 pm) and getting that communicated with another set of talking points. Stage 3 would be major pipe or pump failure that would push into a full watering ban and conservation of use. Already met with fire and public safety departments of the cities to gather information in creating the talking points and plan of communication if Stage 3 is necessary to implement. If a drought were to happen, a watering ban would be necessary to conserve the water and keep the drawdown to a minimum during the project construction. Maybe present to the property owners to ask them to think about their water use during the construction project. Educating them about the advantages and disadvantages of when to water as well. The ban would be communicated to property owners in all three cities and not just the properties within the construction corridor. The point person for communication on the project will be decided with the review of the communication plan. NEXT STEPS JWC Distribution SYstem Study The JWC distribution system consists of about 21 miles of pipe larger than 12 inches in diameter. This system takes water from the JWC reservoirs and water towers out to the three cities' systems. The majority of the distribution system owned by the JWC is the 36-inch PCCP pipe. The TAC is recommending an analysis of the 21 miles of pipe be completed to identify liabilities and what will need to be done to address those liabilities. They are recommending the study be done in coincide with the Douglas Drive rehabilitation project so that forensic testing on the pipe if necessary and get better feel for what facing system wide. Begin talking scope of services soon including discussions with consulting firms that do this type of analysis. Anticipate recommend to the JWC in the fall and winter 2015. The study will be ongoing in 2016 and completed in late 2016, Tri-City Council Meeting Minutes March 31, 2015 Page 5 early 2017. The study does not have a defined scope so no costs can be determined yet. Mayor Harris requested a map of the distribution system be sent out to the member cities and included on the JWC website, www.jwcontap.orq. OTHER BUSINESS Operations durinq Construction The emergency wells can only be used those as a last resort. As long as there is water in the reservoir, the JWC cannot access the wells. If a partial or complete ban is implemented, can the State offer any assistance. If the wells are used, the conservation ban would be strict. That is the worst-case scenario. Not anticipating that. Discussion of Third Well The third well has not been built in Golden Valley for the reason we don't want to take the Golden Valley reservoir out of service due to a generator that needs to be moved. With the work needed to repair the emergency repair/replacement of the PCP pipe. Recommending delay of construction of the Golden Valley well at this time. The two wells and New Hope well currently are out-producing the anticipated amount and staff is confident those wells could provide a sufficient supply in the event of an emergency. If the production rate should change in the near future, re-examining the construction of the Golden Valley well sooner than anticipated will be discussed. Redistribute those funds to offset the construction costs needed for the 36 inch pccp. Recommending delaying construction for 3 to 5 years. The contract for the wells may need to be amended if that is recommended by the city attorney. ADJOURNMENT Mayor Harris adjourned the meeting at 7:09 p.m. Respectfully submitted, Pat Schutrop, Recording Secretary as�,ett Cr�, � � ' Itern�A ' � ' BCWMC'6-18-15 ' Bassett Creek Watershed Management Commission Minutes of Regular Meeti�g May 21,2015 Golden Valley City Hall, 8:30 a.m. Commissioners and Staff Present: Crystal Commissioner Guy Mueller, Vice Chair Robbinsdale Alternate Commissioner Michael Scanlan Golden Valley Commissioner Stacy Hoschka, Treasurer St. Louis Park Commissioner Jim de Lambert, Chair Medicine Lake Commissioner Clint Carlson Administrator Laura Jester Minneapolis Commissioner Michael Welch Attorney Charlie LeFevere, Kennedy& Graven Minnetonka Commissioner Jacob Millner Engineer Karen Chandler, Barr Engineering Co. New Hope Alternate Commissioner Pat Crough Recorder Amy Herbert Plymouth Commissioner Ginny Black Technical Advisory Committee (TAC)Members/Other Attendees Present: Adam Arvidson, Minneapolis Park and Rec Board Jeff Oliver, TAC, City of Golden Valley Derek Asche, TAC,City of Plymouth Bob Paschke,TAC,City of New Hope Erick Francis,TAC, City of St. Louis Park Mark Ray, TAC, City of Crystal Christopher Gise, Golden Valley Resident Liz Stout, TAC, City of Minnetonka Jere Gwin-Lenth, Friends of Northwood Lake David Tobelmann,Alternate Commissioner, City of Association Plymouth Chris Long, TAC,City of New Hope Andrea Weber, Minneapolis Park and Rec Board Richard McCoy, TAC, City of Robbinsdale Robert White, Friends of Northwood Lake Association Jane McDonald Black, Alternate Commissioner, City of Doug Williams, Friends ofNorthwood Lake Association Golden Valley Patrick Noon, Alternate Commissioner, City of St. Louis Park 1.CALL TO ORDER AND ROLL CALL On Thursday, May 21, 2015, at 8:34 a.m. in the Council Conference room at Golden Valley City Hall,Chair de Lambert called to order the meeting of the Bassett Creek Watershed Management Commission(BCWMC)and asked for roll call to be taken [Cities of Minneapolis and Robbinsdale absent from roll call]. 1 BCWMC May 21, 2015, Meeting Minutes 2. CITIZEN FORUM ON NON-AGENDA ITEMS No items were raised. 3.AGENDA Chair de Lambert requested that item 6E— Discuss Clean Water Partnership Grant Award and Northwood Lake Improvement Project(NL-1) be moved forward in the agenda to immediately follow item 6B—Consider Submitting Draft Watershed Management Plan for 90-day Review. Commissioner Black moved to approve the agenda as amended. Commissioner Mueller seconded the motion. �on a vote,the motion carried 7-0. [Cities of Minneapolis and Robbinsdale absent from vote.] �Commissioner Welch, Minneapolis, and Alternate Commissioner Scanlan arrive.J 4. CONSENT AGENDA Commissioner Hoschka moved to approve the Consent Agenda. Alternate Commissioner Crough seconded the motion. Upon a vote,the motion carried 9-0. [The following items were approved as part of the Consent Agenda: the April 16,2015, Commission Meeting minutes,the monthly financial report,the payment of the invoices, Approval of 26`h Avenue North Development-Minneapolis,Approval Not to Waive Monetary Limits on Municipal Tort Liability, Approval of Reimbursement Request from City of Minneapolis for CR2012 Main Stem Restoration Project,Accept and Authorize Distribution of Fiscal Year 2014 Financial Audit,and Approval of Agreement with Metropolitan Council for Participation in 2015 Citizen-Assisted Monitoring Program(CAMP)]. The general and construction account balances reported in the Fiscal Year 2015 Financial Report prepared for the May 21, 2015, meeting are as follows: Checking Account Balance $749,681.98 TOTAL GENERAL FUND BALANCE $749,681.98 TOTAL CASH& INVESTMENTS ON-HAND (5/1315) $3,377,702.98 CIP Projects Levied—Budget Remaining ($4,137,299.52) Closed Projects Remaining Balance $759,596.54 2012-2014 Anticipated Tax Levy Revenue $9,634.81 2015 Anticipated Tax Levy Revenue $1,000,000.00 Anticipated Closed Project Balance $250,038.27 5. PUBLIC HEARING: Receive Comments on Draft 10-year Watershed Management Plan Chair de Lambert opened the public hearing and called for comments on the BCWMC draft Watershed 2 BCWMC May 21, 2015, Meeting Minutes Management Plan. He called for comments again. Upon hearing no comments, Chair de Lambert closed the hearing at 8:40 a.m. 6. BUSINESS A. Receive Presentation from Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board Staff on Theodore Wirth Park Master Plan Andrea Weber of the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board(MPRB)introduced herself and Adam Arvidson, also with the MPRB. Ms. Weber gave a presentation with an overview of the Theodore Wirth Park, and the Park's Master Plan process. She explained that the result of the master plan process is a 100-page document detailing what the Master Plan will accomplish over the next 20 years. Ms. Weber noted that the public comment period extended from October 15,2014,to January 9, 2015, and that the MPRB received 160 comments prior to the public hearing. She said comments were received from six outside partner agencies. She described how the MPRB organized the received comments by sorting them into themes. Ms. Weber detailed how the MPRB handled the responses to comments. Ms. Weber reported that the plan has been approved by the MPRB Board and the Metropolitan Council's Park and Open Space Committee and will soon be in front ofthe Metropolitan Council Board. Ms. Weber presented maps of different areas of the park, talked about features of the park and described changes to the park as outlined in the master plan. She went into detail about the natural surface trail system, particularly the off-road bike trails. Ms. Weber responded to comments and questions. She offered to host a trail walk with Commissioners to they could see the natural surface trail system. Commissioner Welch remarked that the BCWMC and the MPRB have a lot of opportunity to work together as not much construction has occurred yet. He recommended that the MPRB participate in the BCWMC's TAC meetings. Commissioner Hoschka suggested that the MPRB collaborate with the BCWMC on signage in the park. Ms. Weber said that the Commission could send further comments and questions to Administrator Jester, who would forward them to the MPRB. (Commissioner Hoschka, Golden valley, departed the meeting. Alternate Commissioner McDonald Blackpresent to represent Golden valley.J B. Consider Submitting Draft Watershed Management Plan for 90-Day Review i. Approval of Technical Advisory Committee Recommendations on Requirements Document Engineer Chandler explained that the Requirements Document will be incorporated into the Watershed Management Plan as an appendix and the Commission would need to approve the Requirements Document prior to taking action to submit the Draft Plan for the 90-day review. She described what was included in the Requirements Document and summarized the revisions to the document. There was discussion about items in the revised Requirements Document. Commissioner Welch suggested that the Commission add to a future agenda a discussion of the fee structure so the Commission can ensure the fees are appropriate for the revised requirements. Commissioner Welch asked for more information on the documenYs concept of"MIDS or equivalent standard." Engineer Chandler described why this language is used in the document. Commissioner Black moved to approve the TAC's recommended changes to the BCWMC's 3 BCWMC May 21, 2015, Meeting Minutes Requirements Document and to include the revised Requirements Document in the BCWMC's Watershed Management Plan. Alternate Commissioner McDonald Black seconded the motion. Mr. Asche asked how the benefit of the stream buffer is quantified. Engineer Chandler responded that the benefit could be quantified if the buffer were bigger but the smaller the buffer,the harder it is to quantify. There was a discussion of the BCWMC's priority streams and a lengthy discussion on the stream buffer requirement in the revised Requirements Document. Staff noted the buffer requirement was discussed and negotiated during several meetings including TAC meetings, Plan Steering Committee meetings, and Commission workshops. Mr. Asche requested a fact sheet on buffers that cities can use with developers to help justify the buffer requirement. Staff agreed to develop a fact sheet. U�on a vote,the motion carried 9-0. ii. Direct Staff to Submit Draft Plan for 90-day Review Administrator Jester reminded the Commission that it received no comments during today's public hearing on the draft plan. She reported that staff submitted to State review agencies and other partners the responses to comments received during the 60-day review. Administrator Jester said that staff is requesting Commission direction to submit the draft plan for the 90-day review. She summarized the anticipated timeline for the remaining steps of the watershed plan process: • Draft Plan is submitted for 90-day review, which would start on approximately June 1; • The Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources(BWSR) Metro Subcommittee would meet likely in late July or early August and Commission staff and Chair de Lambert would likely make a presentation to that subcommittee. • The BWSR Metro Subcommittee would make a recommendation to the full BWSR Board. • The BWSR Board does not have a July meeting so would take up the Subcommittee's recommendation at the August BWSR Board meeting. • The BCWMC's September 17, 2015, meeting would include adoption of the final proposed plan as an agenda item. Commissioner Welch moved to approve submitting the draft plan for the 90-day review.Alternate Commissioner Jane McDonald Black seconded the motion. Upon a vote,the motion carried 9-0. C. Discuss Clean Water Partnership Grant Award and Northwood Lake Improvement Project (NL-1) Administrator Jester reported that the Commission was awarded a$300,000 Clean Water Partnership Grant from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency for the Northwood Lake Project. She noted that the grant was based on the project's implementation of option A,the underground stormwater reuse chamber, pump house and redistribution system and rain gardens and option C,the construction of a wet ponding basin on the west side of the lake. Administrator Jester reminded the Commission that at next month's meeting the Commission will take action on its Major Plan Amendment, which incorporates the Northwood Lake project and the Honeywell Pond Expansion project into the Commission's CIP. Administrator Jester said that also at the June meeting, the Commission will be making a decision on which of the Northwood Lake project options to implement and setting a maximum levy amount for 2016. She asked what information the Commission would want in order to make those decisions. Administrator Jester described Envision,an in-depth guidance and rating system 4 BCWMC May 21, 2015, Meeting Minutes used to assess the sustainability metrics of all types and sizes of infrastructure. She said that Barr Engineering staff walked through the process with her for the Northwood Lake project,comparing the stormwater reuse option to the stormwater ponding option, so many of the metrics for this project have already been calculated. Administrator Jester said that she could bring this information to the Commission in June. Commissioner Welch said that he would like to see the Envision outcomes. Commissioner Welch moved to authorize the Administrator to work with the Commission Engineer to complete the Envision analysis of the Northwood Lake project options and at a cost not to exceed $750 to come from the general engineering technical services fund. Alternate Commissioner Scanlan seconded the motion. Mr. Paschke commented that he believes that the strength of the Commission greatly helped to secure the Clean Watershed Partnership Grant. He said there are other grants that he would like the watershed to try to receive for this project. Commissioner Tobelmann remarked that the Commission needs to consider what kinds of costs it wants to take on with projects that have a primary benefit to a city compared to the watershed. Upon a vote,the motion carried 9-0. Alternate Commissioner McDonald Black said that she would like to know the cost per acre of parkland that is being saved by not installing the stormwater pond.The City of New Hope said it would try to provide this information for the June meeting. D. Discuss Proposed 2016 Operating Budget and Member City Assessments Administrator Jester provided an overview of the proposed 2016 operating budget and assessment. She reported that the proposed assessment to the member cities is the same as this year and 2014($490,000). She went through the proposed changes for the 2016 budget compared to the 2015 budget. Administrator Jester went through a list of items that the Budget Committee did not have time to discuss but that are additional budget items staff would like to propose for 2016, including. Creek signs at major crossings;develop a CIP inspection and/or maintenance program, which has been recommended by the TAC, a shore land habitat monitoring program, and developing a workshop series for Commissioners to educate them on topics that can't be fully covered during regular meetings. Administrator Jester and Engineer Chandler responded to comments and questions. Alternate Commissioner Scanlan moved to approve the proposed budget and assessment and to direct the Administrator to prepare a supplemental memo detailing the newly proposed budget items for review at the June Commission meeting, and to delay submitting the proposed budget to member cities until after the Commission's June meeting. Commissioner Mueller seconded the motion. Commissioner Black stated that the Commission has discussed the idea of an Aquatic Invasive Species(AIS) task force and she would like to see this task force on the Commission's work plan. Administrator Jester responded that the proposed budget has allocated up to$5,000 for this work for 2016. Upon a vote,the motion carried 8-0(City of Plymouth abstained from the vote). E. Consider Approval of Technical Advisory Committee Recommendations from 4-2-15 Meeting i. 2017-2021 Capital Improvement Program Mr. Francis stated that the TAC reviewed three options for the proposed CIP list 2017-2021. He reported that the TAC recommends that the Commission approve Option 2, which spreads the costs of more projects over two years than does Option 1. Administrator Jester and Engineer Chandler 5 BCWMC May 21, 2015, Meeting Minutes responded to questions. Commissioner Black moved to approve the 2017-2021 CIP, Option 2. Alternate Commissioner Scanlan seconded the motion. �on a vote,the motion carried 9-0. ii. Timing for Study of Flood Control Project Rehab & Replacement Responsibilities & Funding Mr. Francis reported that the TAC recommends the Commission begin this study in 2015 with funds from the Long Term Maintenance Fund. Engineer Chandler noted that she expects most of the work for the study to be completed through a series of TAC meetings and would involve Commission Engineer Kremer and Legal Counsel LeFevere. Commissioner Black moved to authorize starting this project at a cost not to exceed $15,000 and for those funds to first be taken from the Operating Budget and second from the Long-term Maintenance budget. Alternate Commissioner Scanlan seconded the motion. �on a vote,the motion carried 9-0. F. Consider Approval of 2014 Annual Report Commissioner Welch moved approval and distribution of the annual report. Commissioner Black seconded the motion. Upon a vote,the motion carried 9-0. Commissioner Welch asked that the report's executive summary be posted as a separate document on the Commission website. 7. COMMUNICATIONS A. Administrator: Administrator Jester noted her communications in the written Administrator's report. B. Chair: No Chair Communications C. Commissioners: i. Commissioner Welch reported that another version of watershed consolidation legislation has been introduced, which could consolidate the Hennepin County watersheds into three organizations:North, Middle, and South. He said there has been discussion about convening a group of Hennepin County watershed organizations to discuss this issue. He suggested that Administrator Jester participate on behalf of the Commission and perhaps a commissioner would be interested in participating as well. Commissioner Black suggested that the Commission discuss this issue at a future meeting. ii. Commissioner Welch announced that the Waters of the United States rule will come out soon regarding the definition of federal jurisdiction over surface waters. iii. Commissioner Black reported that the Plymouth City Council met regarding the Medicine Lake water level study that the City of Plymouth and the City of Medicine Lake proposed to share. She said that the Plymouth City Council is not currently in favor of the City of Plymouth moving forward with this study. D. TAC Members: Mr. Oliver reported that the Twin Lake alum treatment had occurred earlier that week and went well. E. Committees: Administrator Jester noted that the Education Committee met to kick-off the website redesign proj ect. F. Legal Counsel: i. Attorney LeFevere announced that his firm is throwing his retirement party in June, and he described 6 BCWMC May 21, 2015, Meeting Minutes how Kennedy&Graven will continue to provide legal services to the Commission. G. Engineer: i. Engineer Chandler said she doesn't see anything coming up on the horizon regarding the Blue Line LRT and reported that staff had some follow up communications with the Blue Line LRT last month. ii. Engineer Chandler said that staff is following up on funding options for the XP-SWMM and will bring information to the Commission's June meeting. She said that in the meantime preliminary work is being done including setting up monitoring on the North Branch of Bassett Creek. 8. INFORMATION ONLY (Available at http://www.bassettcreekwmo.org/Meetings/2015/2015-May/2015MayMeetingPacket.htm) A. CIP Project Update Chart B. Grant Tracking Summary and Spreadsheet C. NEMO Save the Date Flyer 9. ADJOURNMENT Chair de Lambert adjourned the meeting at 1 1:30 a.m. Amy Herbert, Recorder Date Secretary Date 7 C l��' �?� �X.: �� �1 . �`rc .. t� � �� Administrative Services De artment � � � p 763-593-8013/763-593-3969(fax) Executive Summary For Action Golden Valley City Council Meeting July 21, 2015 Agenda Item 3. E. Approve Requests for Beer and/or Wine at Brookview Park Prepared [iy Kris Luedke, City Clerk Summary As per City Code Section 10.83, Subd. 2 I. "No person shall possess, display, consume or use alcoholic beverages on any City park property, unless permission is granted by the Council." As part of the application process for a Facilities Use Permit to use the large and small picnic shelters at Brookview Park the applicant has the option to pay an additional $25 to be able to serve beer and/or wine. Attached is a list of the individuals and/or organizations who have requested that option. Attachments • Beer and/or wine request list (1 page) Recommended Action Motion to approve the requests for beer and/or wine at Brookview Park as recommended by staff. BEER AND/OR WINE REQUEST LIST INDIVIDUAL OR ORGANIZATION CC DATE DATE TIME SHELTER APPROVED Emily Svendsen 08-04 5 pm - 10 pm Small 07-21-15 Rachel Carroll-Allianz 08-11 11 am -4 pm Large 07-21-15 Teresa Yueh 08-15 11 am -4 pm Small 07-21-15 {. 1 C�'' C)� ��f' �c�, � � � �� �� � � Public Works De artment �'�. . ��,� - - - p 763 593 8030/763-593 3988(fax) Executive Summary For Action Golden Valley City Council Meeting July 21, 2015 Agenda Item 3. F. Authorize Agreement with WSB, Inc. for Professional Services for Pond &Wetland Assessment Prepared By Jeff Oliver, PE, City Engineer Eric Eckman, Public Works Specialist Summary As part of its municipal stormwater permit with the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA), the City is required to assess its stormwater basins (ponds and wetlands) to determine the sediment and nutrient treatment effectiveness, and to develop a schedule for inspection and maintenance activities that are based on measurable goals and priorities. According to the permit, this analysis and prioritization must be completed in 2015. In addition, the Bassett Creek Watershed Management Commission (BCWMC) requires that member cities inventory, classify, and determine the functions and values of their wetlands, and maintain a database of the assessment results. The results of the wetland assessment will help to establish standards for wetland management and protection, and guide the establishment of vegetative buffers, consistent with BCWMC policies. The City has received a proposal from WSB, Inc. for professional services to assess the City's ponds and wetlands in the amount of$56,340. The attached proposal includes the following work items: � Organize and format the City's stormwater basin information � Customize and provide the City with a software program for modeling and analyzing treatment effectiveness, and prioritizing inspection and maintenance activities � Conduct field surveys and sediment samples of select basins � Complete the initial analysis and prioritization ranking � Perform wetland assessment in conformance with the BCWMC and the Minnesota Rapid Assessment Method (MnRAM) The City has demonstrated its commitment to water quality though its continued investment in the construction and maintenance of its storm water infrastructure. This study includes access to a sophisticated software program which allows the City the ability to manage its stormwater basins in real time, providing it with metrics to help make informed decisions about how to target and improve the efficiencies of its infrastructure to protect water resources and help meet the water quality goals of impaired waters such as Sweeney Lake. Funding for this project is provided in the City's 2015-2019 Capital Improvement Program, Storm Sewer Section (SS-23, page 78) in the amount of$150,000 in 2015. It was determined that the City complete the assessment of its ponds and wetlands in 2015 before continuing with its ongoing storm water pond dredging program in 2016 and beyond. The results of this assessment will be used to prioritize and budget for future storm water improvement projects, including the periodic dredging of stormwater ponds and wetlands, consistent with MPCA permit requirements. Funding for the annual subscription fee for hosting, maintenance, and updates to the pond management software program will be provided by 7303.6340 beginning in 2017. Attachments • Proposal from WSB, Inc. to Jeff Oliver, dated June 23, 2015, to provide a Storm Water Pond Management Program and Wetland Assessments in the City (4 pages) Recommended Action Motion to authorize agreement with WSB, Inc. for Professional Services to provide a Storm Water Pond Management Program and Wetland Assessments in the City of Golden Valley in the amount not to exceed $56,340. � rr�� dF Arrcrc� engineering•planning•environmentat�canstruction 701 xenie avenue Soum SuNe 300 Mir�eapolis,MN 55416 Tel: 763-b41�4800 Fax: 763-541-1700 June 23,2015 Mr. JeffOliver City of Golden�alley 7800 Golden Valley Road Golden Valley, MN 55427 Re: Proposal to Provide a Storm Water Pond Management Prograrn(SWPMP)and Wettand Assessments for the City of Golden Valley Dear Mr.Oliver: We are pleased to present this work plan to develop and implement a Storm Water Pond Management Program(SWPMP)as well as wetlartd assessments for selected wetlands within the City of GoIden Valley(City)consistent with MPCA and Basset Creek Watershed Management Commission requirements. The SWPMI'wilt assist the City with scheduling and budgeting inspection and maintenance activiries,tracking Total Suspended Solids(TSS)and Total Phosphorus(TP}pollutant loadings,and can be used to help meet the City's MS4 permit requirements. This prograrn will establish your Standard Operating Procedure{SOP)for managing your storm water basins. The wetland assessments will provide a general assessment of the quality of the selected wetlands. BACKGROUND INFORMATION Minimum Control Measures 5 and 6 of the MS4 permit require the City to have a standard operating procedure for inspections and maintenance of their MS4 owned and operated facilities (BMPs). Minimum Control Measure 6 also requires the City to develop pond assessments to detennine the treatment effectiveness of storm water basins within the City. WSB has met with the MPCA to review our approach(outlined below)to verify that it will meet thc MPCA's requirements oudined in the NPDES permit. MPCA staff has indicated that the SWPMP will satisfy the requirements for the inventories and SOP required in the NPDES germit. The City contains appraxinnately 200 storm water basins and storm water wedands.The task of inspecting and maintaining these items, as well as tracking the treatment efficiency of these basins, is a significant commitment of staff time and a financially daunting task.To allow the City to manage its storm water system, annually allocate budget,and meet MS4 requirements WSB proposes to develop a SWPMP by completing the following scope of services. Equal Oppor4iniry Employer wsbeng.com w:v.�..i.w.�.v�v.rnn�ew,w�o.u..v.�ry an�e.a�, Mr. Oliver June 23,2015 Page 3 • Rank the life cycle cost-benefit to help the City determine the value of performing maintenance or improvement activities on any given storm water basin. • Provide calculated responses regarding storm water basin maintenance activities (similar to a pavement management program} • Meet MS4 requirements for storm water basin management Task 3—Field Surveys and Sediment Samples WSB will complete 12 pond surveys to evaluate the bathymetry,unique characteristics, and storm water capacity of each pond. This will include developing detailed bathymetric maps showing planned and surveyed contours as well as sedirnent accumulation areas. In addition,WSB will take sediment sample.s at 3 of the ponds (consistent with MPCA guidelines)to test for PAHs and RCRA metals and analyze the results to deternzine the appropriate method of reuse or disposal.The proposed fee includes lab costs for 6 sediment samples. Task 4—Complete Wetland Assessment The Minnesota Rapid Assessment Method(I��inRAM)will be completed for City's MS4 managed wetlands. Based on the mapping provided by the City,there are approximately 120 of these wetlands withixi city-owned or county-owned property. The MnRAM assessment will include a full fieId assessment, stomi sewer mapping review,hydrology and watershed review,landscape assessment,quantitative vegetation review, as well as habitat assessment in conformance with the MnRAM guidance.A picture of the wetland will be taken ar►d linked within the GIS database. The wetlands will be ranked based on the MnRAM quality assessment process using the BWSR standard method of ranking or a modified version{based on WSB's past work with numerous cities on this modification). The data will be pmvided in a GIS map. No report is anticipated to be generated fi-om this task. Software Cost and Annual Subscrigtion Fee ` The SWPMP Web Application cost is $5,900 with an annual saftware subscription of $2,900 beginning in 2017. This subscription includes access to the web application, cloud server storage of City's program, application maintenance, and future soflware updates. WSB intends ta keep the SWPMP current and relevant by pz-oviding progracn updates as necessary. WSB will notify you when updates are available. COST SUMMARY • Tasks 1-4 be billed hourly and at a cost not to exceed$50,440 +� Web Application will be billed at a lump sum cost of$5,900 = Annual subscription for Web Application will be billed at a lump sum cost of S2,9U0 (starting in 2017). �:•:nropoYls�idm�dlc�Jtr�wunp_poWa�Nlry p5�15 Qa Mr. Oliver June 23, 2015 Page 2 Task 1—Organize and Format Golden Valley Input Parameters for SWPMP WSB will work with City staff to complete the following steps needed for the SWPMP: + Identify the various basins present within the City for incorporation into the SWPMP � Develop and define attributes for each basin which include: o Facility type(pond, infiltration basin,storm water wetland,etc.} o Storage voiume of facility o Treatment expectations o Size of drainage area o Imperviousness of drainage area o Receiving water classif�cation/sensitivity o Impaired Waters and Waste Load Allocation status of approved TMDLs o Anti-Degradation considerations o BMP sensitivity analysis o Field investigation process and results o BMP age and historic maintenance acrivities completed o Ownership{priva.te vs.publie) o Access for maintenance • Gather any pond inspection data which has been collected to date. This data will need to be formatted to meet the programming needs of the SWPMP. Task 2—Develop and Launch a Customized Version of SWPMP far the City WSB will utilize the information collected during Task 1 to develop an individually tailored SWPMP using ArcGIS Server. The web application will be hosted by WSB.The web-based SWPMI'prograrn will allow City employees to easily access information related to the City's storm water basins,complete and store survey records,and update information as needed. It is anticipated that the web application will be developed for approximately 200 storm water basins/wetlands. WSB will develop the initial inspection and maintenance prioritizations based on the compvsite score for each of the storm water basins in the City. Inspection and maintenance prioritizations will provide the City with a tool for allocating its resources in an effactive and efficient manner. In addition,WSB will complete the following activities as part of this pmposal. In the future,using the information stored in the web application, SWPMP will allow the user to: • Update the composite SWPMP score for each storm water basin. Composite scores can be updated by City staff to keep prioririzations current and update budget estimates for inspection and maintenance activiries. • Track/update estimated annual treatment efficiencies and annual load reduction provided by each storm water basin for TP and TSS. A•:�aroc�_,pwm wu�.ar o.w�...w_w�•nry aszns.mc- Mr. Oliver June 23,2015 Page 4 If you are in agreernent with the scope of services outlined above,please sign where indicated below and return one copy to our office. Tf you should have any qnestions regarding this proposal,please contact Todd at 763-287-7182 or Jake at 763-231-4861. Sincerely, WSB&Associates Inc. .....�..—/ /� � Todd Hubmer,PE e Newhall, PE Water Resources Group Manager Project Maxtager ACCEPTED BY: City of Golden Valley I hereby authorize WSB&Associates,Inc. to complete Tasks 1—4 and web applicatian cost for a not to exceed cost of�56,340. In addition,I authorize an annual billing of$2,900 for the SWPMP annual subscription (starting in 2017). Narne Title Date a•.fopm's.ptldo�rallqUt prup_nimp�dQeiwliry 0623�S.dax Cl�� t1� '� � � � Fire De artment � � - - p - - 763 593 8079/763 593 8098(fax) Executive Summary For Action Golden Valley City Council Meeting July 21, 2015 Agenda Item 3. G. Second Consideration -Amendment to City Code Regarding the Golden Valley Property Maintenance Code Prepared By John Crelly, Fire Chief Rick Hammerschmidt, Deputy Fire Chief Summary At the June 9, 2015, Council/Manager meeting, staff presented Council with amendments to the City Code to adopt the International Property Maintenance Code (IPMC) by reference. Council requested that staff proceed with the amendment changes. First consideration of this ordinance was presented at the July 7, 2015, Council Meeting. There was discussion on several points. With the adoption of the IPMC the reference document for electrical violations is NFPA 70 National Electrical Code (NEC). We confirmed with Steve Tokle, City Electrical Inspector that NFPA 70 is a reprint of the NEC and is acceptable. Outdoor Wood Storage provisions, Section 310 of the amended IPMC, were carried over from the current property maintenance code. These provisions regulate the amount, size, condition and location of wood piles. It also defines "fire wood" and that fire wood is not for resale. These provisions were adopted in 2007. The process for appealing a violation of the Golden Valley Property Maintenance Code or an Administrative Citation is detailed in Section 2.91 titled Administrative Hearing Procedures. In Subdivision 1, titled Administrative Hearings, City Council approves people who will serve as hearing officers. Also detailed are times lines for the appeal, rights of the appellant, powers and duties of the hearing officer. Subdivision 2, titled Appeal from an Administrative Hearing, details that an aggrieved party may obtain a judicial review of the decision of the hearing officer in accordance with state law. The costs associated with an appeal are paid for impart by an application fee for an appeal. The balance of the costs will be paid with fines imposed by administrative citation fees as detailed in Section 2.90 Subdivisions 3, 4, 5, 6, 8 and 10. Currently, Chapter 4, Section 4.60 of City Code, titled Residential Property Maintenance Code, contains regulations pertaining to minimum exterior standards of all residential properties, rental and multiple dwelling exterior standards, rental and multiple dwelling interior standards, rental and multiple dwelling mechanical standards and licensing of rental dwellings. The intertwining of these large scoping code elements are confusing, not comprehensive, not based on any model codes and it contains rental licensing requirements that should be in Chapter 6 of City Code. Staff recommends the adoption of the 2012 IPMC which is produced by the International Code Council (ICC). The ICC also coordinates and produces all the other model codes that the City of Golden Valley has adopted including the Fire Code, Building Code, Residential Code, Plumbing Code and Mechanical Code. These model codes are developed through a public process and are coordinated between them to eliminate conflicting language. These model codes are widely adopted and used around the metropolitan area. Attachments • Ordinance#563, Amending Chapter 4: Buildings and Signs, Adoption of 2012 International Property Maintenance Code (6 pages) • Summary of Ordinance #563, Amending Chapter 4: Buildings and Signs, Adoption of 2012 International Property Maintenance Code (2 pages) Recommended Action Motion to adopt Second Consideration, Ordinance #563, amending City Code Regarding the Golden Valley Property Maintenance Code. Motion to approve Summary of Ordinance#563 for publication. ORDINANCE NO. 563, 2ND SERIES AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE CITY CODE Amending Chapter 4: Buildings and Signs, Adoption of 2012 International Property Maintenance Code The City Council for the City of Golden Valley hereby ordains as follows: Section 1. City Code Section 4.60, entitled "Residential Property Maintenance Code" is amended by deleting it in its entirety and replacing it with the 2012 International Property Maintenance Code by reference with the following changes: Section 4.60: International Property Maintenance Code Subdivision 1. Code Adopted The International Property Maintenance Code, 2012 Edition, ("IPMC") published by the International Code Council, Inc., is hereby adopted by reference for the City as modified and amended by Subdivisions 2 below. The IPMC, as modified and amended by Subdivisions 2 below, shall be considered a part of this Section as if set out in full herein and shall be referred to as the Golden Valley Property Maintenance Code. Subdivision 2. Amendments to the IPMC The IPMC adopted by reference in Subdivision 1 is hereby amended in the following respects for application within the City: (a) Section 101.1. This Section is revised in its entirety to read as follows: "These regulations shall be known as the Golden Valley Property Maintenance Code, hereinafter referred to as "this code."" (b) Section 102.1. The following sentence is added at the end of this Section. "When there is a conflict between this code and any other section of the City Code, the more restrictive shall govern." (c) Section 102.3. In the first sentence, the terms: "International Building Code, International Energy Conservation Code, International Fire Code, International Fuel Gas Code, International Mechanical Code, International Residential Code, International Plumbing Code and NFPA 70" are deleted and replaced with "Minnesota State Building Code, the Minnesota State Fire Code, the Minnesota Plumbing Code, the Minnesota Residential Code, the Minnesota Fuel Gas Code, the Minnesota Mechanical Code, the Minnesota Electrical Code, the Minnesota Residential Energy Code and the Minnesota Commercial Energy Code". In the second sentence the term "International Zoning Code" is deleted and replaced with "City Zoning Code as set forth in Chapter 11 of the City Code". (d) Section 102.7. This first sentence of this Section is revised in its entirety to read as follows: "The codes and standards referenced in this code shall be those that are listed in the Minnesota State Building Code, the Minnesota State Fire Code, the Minnesota Plumbing Code, the Minnesota Residential Code, the Minnesota Fuel Gas Code, the Minnesota Mechanical Code, the Minnesota Electrical Code, the Minnesota Residential Energy Code and the Minnesota Commercial Energy Code Ordinance No. 563 - continued and considered part of the requirements of this code to the prescribed extent of each such reference and as further regulated in Sections 102.7.1 and 102.7.2." (e) Section 103. The title of this Section is revised in its entirety to read as follows: "Administration of this Property Maintenance Code." (fl Section 103.1. This Section is revised in its entirety to read as follows: "The City Manager shall administer this code." (g) Section 103.2. This Section is revised in its entirety to read as follows: "The City Manager or the City Manager's designee shall designate the code official responsible for the administration and enforcement of this code." (h) Section 103.4 The term "member of the board of appeals" is deleted and replaced with the term "administrative hearing officer." (i) Section 103.5. This Section is revised to add at the end of the existing language: "the City's master fee schedule adopted by the City Council from time to time." Q) Section 106.3. This first sentence of this Section is revised in its entirety to read as follows: "Any person failing to comply with a notice of violation or order served in accordance with Section 107 shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor or a civil offense punishable by administrative citation in accordance with the City Code, and the violation shall be deemed a strict liability offense." (k) Section 109.6. The second sentence of this Section is revised in its entirety to read as follows: "Any affected person shall thereafter, be entitled to an administrative hearing as set forth in Section 2.91 of the City Code." (I) Section 111.1. This Section is revised in its entirety to read as follows: "Any person directty affected by a decision of the code official or a notice or order issued under this code shall have the right to appeal to a hearing officer in an administrative hearing as provided in Section 2.91 of the City Code, provided that a written application for appeal is filed within 20 days after the day the decision, notice or order was served. In the case of an appeal from a notice issued to vacate pending elimination of imminent dangers, the appeal shall be heard as soon as possible after the time of filing. In the case of appeals from other notices, the appeal shall be heard at such time as may be established under Section 2.91 of the City Code. An application for appeal shall be based on a claim that the true intent of this code or the rules legally adopted thereunder have been incorrectly interpreted, the provisions of this code do not fully apply, or the requirements of this code are adequately satisfied by other means." (m) Sections 111.2 through Section 111.7, inclusive, are deleted in their entirety. (n) Section 112.4. This Section is revised in its entirety to read as follows: "Any person who shall continue any work after having been served with a stop work order, except such work as that person is directed to perForm to remove a violation or unsafe condition, shall be liable to a fine set forth in the schedule referred to in Section 103.5 hereof." Ordinance No. 563 - continued (o) Section 201.3. This Section is revised in its entirety to read as follows: "Where terms are not defined in this code and are defined in the Minnesota State Building Code, the Minnesota State Fire Code, the Minnesota Plumbing Code, the Minnesota Residential Code, the Minnesota Fuel Gas Code, the Minnesota Mechanical Code, the Minnesota Electrical Code, the Minnesota Residential Energy Code, the Minnesota Commercial Energy Code and the City of Golden Valley City Code, such terms shall have the meanings ascribed to them as stated in those codes." (p) Section 202. The following definition is added: "CORD OF FIREWOOD. Means a unit of cut fuel wood, equal to one hundred twenty-eight (128) cubic feet in a stack." (q) Section 202. The following definition is added: "FIREWOOD. Wood or wood product used or intended for heating fuel in a dwelling or for recreational fire. Painted or treated wood shall not be considered firewood." (r) Section 202. The following definition is added: "NEAT, SECURED STACK. Means a stack of firewood that is piled in a regular, orderly arrangement that is stable and reasonably resistant to collapse." (s) Section 202. The following definition is added: "RECYCLABLES. Means items of refuse designated by the Hennepin County Department of Environment and Energy to be part of an authorized recycling program and which are intended for processing and remanufacture or reuse." (t) Section 202. The definition of"Rubbish" is revised in its entirety to read: "Combustible and noncombustible waste materials, except garbage; the term shall include the residue from the burning of wood, coal, coke and other combustible materials, paper, rags, cartons, boxes, wood, excelsior, rubber, leather, tree branches, yard trimmings, tin cans, metals, mineral matter, glass, discarded furniture (including unusable/unsafe outdoor furniture), crockery and dust and other similar materials." (u) Section 202. The following definition is added: "YARD WASTE. Grass/lawn clippings, leaves, weeds, garden waste (tomato vines, carrot tops, cucumber vines, etc.) soft bodied plants (flower and vegetable plants), hedge or tree trimmings and twigs (1/4 inch diameter maximum), pine cones and needles." (v) Section 302.4. The words appearing in the brackets in the first sentence are deleted and the words "8 inches" are inserted therein, and the brackets are deleted. (w) Section 304.1.1. The phrase "International Building Code or the International Existing Building Code" is deleted and the term "Minnesota State Building Code" is inserted in its place. (x) Section 304.3. The following sentence is added at the end of this Section: "For a building existing prior to the adoption of this code by the City, the owner shall be responsible for providing building numbering in accordance with Section 4.06 of the City Code until replacement of such numbers is required during a remodeling, residing, or rebuilding of the exterior of the building, or in the event of loss or damage to some or all of such existing numbers." Ordinance No. 563 - continued (y) Section 304.14. The date "May 1" replaces the word "DATE" in the first set of brackets and the date "August 1" replaces the word "DATE" in the second set of brackets, and the brackets are deleted. (z) Section 305.1.1. The phrase "International Building Code or the International Existing Building Code" is deleted and the term "Minnesota State Building Code" is inserted in its place. (aa) Section 306.1.1. The term "International Building Code" is deleted and the term "Minnesota State Building Code" is inserted in its place. (bb) Section 308.1. This Section is revised in its entirety to read as follows: "All exterior property and premises, and the interior of every structure, shall be free from any accumulation of rubbish, garbage, recyclables, and / or yard waste and disposed of in accordance with Section 10.40 of the City Code." (cc) Sections 308.3.3. A new Section is added to read: "RENTAL GARBAGE FACILITIES. All rental property owners shall be responsible for providing garbage pickup and water and sewer services." (dd) Section 310. A new Section is added entitled: "SECTION 310 OUTDOOR WOOD STORAGE." (ee) Sections 310.1. A new Section is added to read: "310.1. General. The following are conditions for outdoor wood storage." (ffl Sections 310.1.1, 310.1.2, and 310.1.3. New Sections 310.1.1, 310.1.2, and 310.1.3 are added to read: "310.1.1 Except for firewood and construction materials necessary for on-site work, no wood or wood product shall be kept or stored upon a residential premises. 310.1.2 Firewood may be stored upon a residential premises solely for use on the premises and not for resale. 310.1.3 All firewood located upon a residential premises shall be stored as follow: 1. The firewood shall be cut/split to a uniform shape thirty (30) inches in length or less, stored in neat, secure stacks, and prepared for use; 2. Each stack cannot exceed a cord of firewood. The height of a woodpile over three (3) feet shall be no more than twice its width, but in no event shall the height exceed five (5) feet; 3. Firewood stacks must have at least ten (10) feet of space from each other; 4. The firewood shall not be in a deteriorating state; Ordinance No. 563 - continued 5. No firewood shall be stored within three (3) feet of any side or five (5) feet of any rear property line, except that if the wood is stored in an accessory structure the accessory structure shall meet all zoning setback requirements; and 6. No firewood shall be stored in the front yard." (gg) Section 401.3. The term "International Building Code" is deleted and replaced with the term "Minnesota State Building Code." (hh) Section 403.5. This Section is revised in its entirety to read as follows: "Clothes dryer exhaust systems shall be independent of all other systems and shall be exhausted outside the structure in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions and the Minnesota Mechanical Code." (ii) Sections 502.5 and 505.1. The term "International Plumbing Code" is deleted and replaced with the term "Minnesota State Plumbing Code". (jj) Section 602.3. The date "October 1" replaces the word "DATE" in the first set of brackets and the date "May 1" replaces the word "DATE" in the second set of brackets, and the brackets are deleted. (kk) Section 602.4. The date "October 1" replaces the word "DATE" in the first set of brackets and the date "May 1" replaces the word "DATE" in the second set of brackets, and the brackets are deleted. (II) Section 604.3.1.1. The term "International Building Code" is deleted and replaced with the term "Minnesota State Building Code". (mm) Section 604.3.2.1. The term "International Building Code" is deleted and replaced with the term "Minnesota State Building Code". (nn) Section 606.1. This first sentence of this Section is revised to read in entirety as follows: "Elevators, dumbwaiters and escalators shall be maintained in compliance with ASME A17 and Chapter 1307 of the Minnesota State Building Code." (oo) Section 702.1. The term "International Fire Code" is deleted and the term "Minnesota State Fire Code" is inserted in its place. (pp) Section 702.2. The term "International Fire Code" is deleted and the term "Minnesota State Fire Code" is inserted in its place. (qq) Section 702.3. The term "International Building Code" is deleted and the term "Minnesota State Building Code" is inserted in its place. (rr) Section 704.1. The term "International Fire Code" is deleted and the term "Minnesota State Fire Code" is inserted in its place. (ss) Section 704.2. The term "International Fire Code" is deleted and the term "Minnesota State Fire Code" is inserted in its place. Ordinance No. 563 - continued (tt) Section 705. A new Section is added entitled: "SECTION 705 CARBON MONOXIDE ALARMS." (uu) Section 705.1. A new Section is added to read: "705.1 General. Carbon monoxide alarms shall be installed in accordance with Minnesota Statute 299F.50-51." (vv) Chapter 8. The following sentence in Chapter 8 is deleted in its entirety: "The application of the referenced standards shall be as specified in Section 102.7." (ww) Chapter 8. In the table regarding the American Society of Mechanical Engineers in Chapter 8, the standard reference number "A17.1/CSA B44-2007" cited therein is changed to: "A17.1/CSA B44-2010." (xx) Chapter 8. The table regarding the International Code Council is deleted in its entirety. Subdivision 3. IPMC on File At least one copy of the IPMC shall be marked CITY OF GOLDEN VALLEY - OFFICIAL COPY and kept on file in the office of the City Clerk and open to inspection and use by the public. Section 2. City Code Chapter 1 entitled "General Provisions and Definitions Applicable to the Entire City Code Including Penalty for Violation" and Section 6.99 entitled "Violation a Misdemeanor" are hereby adopted in their entirety, by reference, as though repeated verbatim herein. Section 3. This Ordinance shall take effect from and after its passage and publication as required by law. Adopted by the City Council this 21St day of July, 2015. /s/Shepard M. Harris Shepard M. Harris, Mayor ATTEST: /s/Kristine A. Luedke Kristine A. Luedke, City Clerk CITY OF GOLDEN VALLEY HENNEPIN COUNTY, MINNESOTA SUMMARY OF ORDINANCE NO. 563, 2ND SERIES AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE CITY CODE Amending Chapter 4: Buildings and Signs, Adoption of 2012 International Property Maintenance Code This is a summary of the provisions of the above Ordinance which has been approved for publication by the City Council. This ordinance amends Chapter 4 Section 4.60: Residential Property Maintenance Code by deleting it in its entirety and replacing it with the 2012 International Property Maintenance Code by reference, with certain amendments, for application in the City of Golder� Valley. The 2012 International Property Maintenance Code, as amended, among other things: • Regulates the conditions and maintenance of property, buildings and structures in the City and establishes minimum maintenance standards for basic equipment, light, ventilation, heating, sanitation and fire safety to ensure that structures in the City are safe, sanitary and fit for occupation and use. • Provides notice to owners, occupants or other responsible parties of violations and requirements to correct violations. • Provides duties and responsibilities for the City officials responsible for enforcement. • Authorizes the City to close structures that are not fit for occupancy, the posting of notice of closing and prohibits occupancy of such structures. • Authorizes the City to take emergency action when there is a dangerous condition at a property. • Upon notice by the City, requires a property owner in control of an unsafe or unsanitary structure to repair or remove the structure; allows the City to remove such structure in the event that the owner or person in control fails to do so. • Provides a procedure for an appeal of a decision or order of the City. • Requires owners of property to maintain the exterior of such property: in a safe, sanitary and clean condition; graded to prevent erosion or accumulation of water; by prohibiting outside storage of vehicles in disrepair; by requiring the display of house numbers; by maintaining windows and doors in good repair and operable condition; and by requiring firewood to be stored in secure stacks. • Requires property owners to keep properties, free of accumulation of garbage or rubbish, except in approved containers. • Requires adequate ventilation by windows or mechanical exhaust systems. • Provides for minimum dimensions of rooms in dwellings and lodging units, egress from bedrooms, accessibility to bathrooms and provides for maximum numbers of occupants in a dwelling unit. • Requires owners to provide and maintain adequate plumbing, including required bathroom and drinking facilities for dwellings and lodging unit. • Requires adequate sanitary water supply system for all plumbing fixtures and specifies location and operation of water heater. • Requires owners to maintain electrical systems in compliance with the specifications of the code and the state electrical code, free of hazards. • Requires owners to be responsible for fire safety by providing and maintaining unobstructed and adequate means of exit from any building, prohibiting storage of combustibles, explosive or hazardous materials except in accordance with fire codes, installing and maintaining required fire suppression systems, installing and maintaining smoke detectors in sleeping areas. The ordinance shall take effect upon publication. NOTICE: The foregoing is only a summary of the ordinance A printed copy of the full text of the ordinance is available for inspection by any person during regular office hours at the office of the City Clerk. Adopted by the City Council this 21St day of July, 2015. /s/Shepard M. Harris Shepard M. Harris, Mayor ATTEST: /s/Kristine A. Luedke Kristine A. Luedke, City Clerk �:��y �� ����� :, �� Fire De artment � r 763-593-8079/763-593-8098(fax) Executive Summary For Action Golden Valley City Council Meeting July 21, 2015 Agenda Item 3. H. Second Consideration - Amendment to City Code Regarding Licensing of Rental Housing Prepared By John Crelly, Fire Chief Rick Hammerschmidt, Deputy Fire Chief Summary At the lune 9, 2015, Council/Manager meeting, staff presented Council with amendments to the City Code to move rental licensing requirements to Chapter 6 of City Code. Council requested that staff proceed with the amendment changes. First consideration of this ordinance was presented at the July 7, 2015, Council Meeting. There was discussion on sections 6.29 Subd. 4.1, Crime Free/Drug Free Lease Addendum and section 6.29 Subd. 6, Disorderly Conduct Violations. The police and judicial system deal with the first three disorderly violations. A fourth and fifth disorderly violations would be addressed by staff and City Council. All steps of this process afford, both the tenant and the rental property owner, due process and the right to appeal. Currently, Chapter 4, Section 4.60 of City Code, titled Residential Property Maintenance Code, currently contains regulations for property maintenance and licensing of rental dwellings. The intertwining of these large scoping elements is confusing. Rental licensing requirements should be in Chapter 6 of City Code. Staff recommends that the requirements for licensing of rental housing be relocated to Chapter 6, Section 6.29 of City Code. Attachments • Ordinance #564, Amending Chapter 6 with addition of Section 6.29: Licensing of Rental Housing (11 pages) • Summary of Ordinance #564, Amending Chapter 6 with addition of Section 6.29: Licensing of Rental Housing (1 page) Recommended Action Motion to adopt second consideration, Ordinance#564, Amendment to Chapter 6 regarding Licensing of Rental Housing. Motion to approve Summary of Ordinance #564 for publication. ORDINANCE NO. 564, 2ND SERIES AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE CITY CODE Addition of Section 6.29: Licensing of Rental Housing The City Council for the City of Golden Valley hereby ordains as follows: Section 1. City Code, Chapter 6 is hereby amended by adding a new Section 6.29, entitled "Licensing of Rental Housing," reading as follows: Section 6.29: Licensing of Rental Housing Subdivision 1. Purpose It is the purpose of this Section to provide minimum standards to safeguard life, limb, health, property and public welfare by regulating and controlling the use and occupancy, construction and maintenance of all residential rental units, buildings and structures within the City. The provisions contained herein are in addition to other applicable provisions of the City Code and not in lieu thereof. Subdivision 2. Scope The provisions of this Section shall apply to all Rental Dwellings, including rented single- family homes, rented duplexes and Rental Dwellings within Owner-occupied buildings, as well as to rented condominiums, rented townhouses and leasehold cooperative Dwelling Units, as those terms are defined in Minnesota Statutes Section 273.124, Subd. 6, Minnesota Statutes, Chapter 515A, and this Section. Subdivision 3. Definitions For the purposes of this Section, the following terms are defined as follows: A. Annual Renewal Date: The date each year by when a Rental License must be renewed, according to the schedule of fiscal years for Rental Licenses and fees established by the City Council pursuant to City Code, Section 6.04. The City Council may establish a different Annual Renewal Date for different types of Rental Dwellings and/or types of building in which Rental Dwellings may be located (e.g., single-family homes, duplexes, townhomes, condominiums, homes with services, etc.). B. Apartment Building: A building in which four (4) or more Rental Dwellings are located and all such Rental Dwellings are owned by the same Owner. C. Code Official: The City Manager or the City Manager's his/her designee. D. Disorderly Conduct: Shall have the meaning given such term in Subdivision 5 of this Section. E. Dwelling Unit: A single dwelling space providing independent living facilities for one (1) or more persons, including permanent provisions for sleeping, eating, cooking, and sanitation. F. Operate: To charge a rental charge or other form of compensation for the use of a Rental Dwelling. Ordinance No. 564 - continued G. Owner: The person owning or holding title to a Rental Dwelling as determined by an examination of record title to the property at the office of the Hennepin County Recorder - Registrar of Titles. If more than one (1) person owns or holds title to an individual Rental Dwelling, such persons shall collectively be an Owner for purposes of this Section. H. Qualifying Relative: Spouse, parent, child, sibling, grandparent, grandchild, aunt, uncle, niece or nephew. The relationship may be either by blood or marriage. The Code Official may require sufficient written proof to establish whether someone is a Qualifying Relative. I. Person: A natural person or legal entity. J. Property Manager: A person authorized to manage and/or operate a Rental Dwelling on behalf of an Owner. K. Renewal License: A Rental License that is a renewal of an existing Rental License granted under this Section, which renewal is granted to the same Owner and for the same Rental Dwelling as the existing Rental License. L. Rental License: The license required under this Section, including any renewal thereof. M. Rental Dwelling: A Dwelling Unit in the City to which a Tenant has been granted the right to use. A Rental Dwelling includes accessory structures such as garages and storage buildings and appurtenances such as sidewalks and retaining walls which are on the premises on which a Rental Dwelling is located. N. Tenant: Any person granted temporary use of a Rental Dwelling, other than the Owner of the Dwelling Unit and/or Qualifying Relative(s) of that Owner, pursuant to a lease or other agreement, whether or not reduced to writing. Subdivision 4. License Required A. When required. No person shall operate a Rental Dwelling unless the Owner thereof shall have first obtained a Rental License for such Rental Dwelling as provided for in this Section. Any Rental License received under this Section shall commence upon the date of issuance and, unless revoked or suspended, shall remain valid until the next applicable Annual Renewal Date, provided no Rental License shall extend for more than a twelve (12) month period. A person who is operating a Rental Dwelling after the Rental License has expired is operating an unlicensed Rental Dwelling. 1. Exceptions: a. A Rental Dwelling is not subject to this Section if it is within a hotel, motel, hospital or a nursing home, assisted living, and other residential facilities or portions thereof licensed and inspected by the state for compliance with state building or fire codes or the City of Golden Valley Property Maintenance Code. A Rental Dwelling within any of the following types of facilities is subject to this Section unless the facility has a facility license issued by the Ordinance No. 564 - continued state and is inspected by the state for compliance with state building or fire codes or the City's Property Maintenance Code: group homes, independent living facilities, assisted living facilities, board and lodging homes, and other residential facilities or portions thereof, including those facilities that provide support services for their residents or that receive program reimbursement or financial assistance. b. A room temporarily leased to a natural person within a Dwelling Unit while the Owner of that Dwelling Unit resides in the Dwelling Unit shall not be subject to this Section, provided no more than three (3) persons shall so lease a room within a Dwelling Unit at one time. B. What the Rental License Covers. There shall be one (1) Rental License for each Rental Dwelling, provided when a building or buildings on a single premises contain two (2) or more Rental Dwellings and all the Rental Dwellings within such building(s) are owned by the same Owner, only one (1) Rental License shall be required for such building(s). The City shall have authority to exercise its licensing powers under this Section, including the power to issue, renew, deny, revoke, and suspend Rental Licenses, with respect to an entire building or only a portion of a building. C. Fees. There shall be annual license fee for each Rental License. Such fee shall be in the amount established by the City Council pursuant to City Code, Section 6.04. There shall be no proration of Rental License fees for a Rental License that extends for less than twelve (12) months. The amount of the Rental License fee may vary based on the type of Rental Dwelling, the type of building in which the Rental Dwelling is located, and/or the number of Rental Dwellings located in the building(s) that is the subject of a Rental License. There shall be no fee charged for an initial inspection to determine the existence of any violations of the City Code at a Rental Dwelling. The City Council shall establish a fee for any reinspections necessary to determine whether identified violations have been corrected, to restore a Rental License that has been revoked or suspended, or for any other reason a reinspection may be required under this Section. The Code Official may waive the reinspection fee in event of an error or other reasonable cause determined by the Code Official, including extension of time granted for compliance. D. Application. Application for a Rental License shall be made in writing on forms promulgated by the City Manager or his/her designee and accompanied by the fee amount. In the case of a license renewal, such application shall be submitted at least thirty (30) days prior to the expiration date of the then existing Rental License. If the application for a license renewal is not received by the City at least thirty (30) days prior to the expiration date of the existing Rental License, the applicant shall pay a late fee in the amount established by the City Council. The Code Official may waive the late fee in event of an error or other reasonable cause determined by the Code Official. All applications shall specify the following: 1. Name, address, and telephone number of the Owner of the Rental Dwelling, including name of the contact person if the Owner is a legal entity. Ordinance No. 564 - continued 2. Name, address, and telephone number of any property manager actively managing said Rental Dwelling. 3. Name and address of the vendee if the Rental Dwelling is owned or being sold on a contract for deed. 4. Legal address of the Rental Dwelling. 5. Number of Rental Dwellings that are the subject of the application if the application involves a building in which two (2) or more Rental Dweltings are located and all such Rental Dwellings are owned by the same Owner. 6. Name, address and telephone number of on-site operating manager, if any. 7. Any other information requested by the Code Official to establish compliance under this Section. 8. If the Owner identified in the application is a legal entity, the applicant shall submit, upon request of the Code Official, the name and address of all partners, shareholders or interest holders. E. Inspections Required. Each Rental License application and Rental License is at all times subject to the Code Official's right to inspect the affected Rental Dwelling to determine whether it is in compliance with the City Code and state law. The Code Official shall determine the schedule of periodic inspections. Inspections may include all common areas, utility and mechanical rooms, garages, exterior of structures and exterior property areas. F. Access for Inspection. No Rental License shall be issued under this Section unless the Owner of the Rental Dwelling agrees to permit inspections, upon reasonable notice from the Code Official to the Owner, to determine compliance with the City Code and state law. The submission of a Rental License application or the possession of a Rental License issued by the City shall constitute such agreement by the Owner identified in the application or on the Rental License. Each Tenant shall grant access to any part of its Rental Dwelling at reasonable times for the purpose of effecting inspection, maintenance, repairs or alterations as are necessary to comply with the provisions of this Section. If any Owner, Owner's agent, property manager or Tenant fails or refuses to permit entry to a Rental Dwelling under its control for an inspection pursuant to this Section, the Code Official may pursue any remedy at law or under the City Code, including, but not limited to, securing an administrative search warrant for the Rental Dwelling, issuing an administrative citation, denying a Rental License application, revoking or suspending a Rental License, or denying a renewal license. Without limiting the foregoing, should an Owner, Owner's agent, or property manager fail to keep a scheduled inspection without reasonable cause or refuse to permit entry to the Rental Dwelling, a reinspection fee may be charged. G. Resident Agent Required. No Rental License shall be issued for a Rental Dwelling unless: Ordinance No. 564 - continued 1. The Owner thereof resides within the counties of Hennepin, Ramsey, Anoka, Carver, Dakota, Scott, Washington, Sherburne or Wright or 2. The Owner designates in writing an agent or property manager residing or located within such counties who is responsible for maintenance and upkeep of the Rental Dwelling and who is authorized to provide the Code Official access to the Rental Dwelling, to receive service of notice of violations of the City Code, to receive orders from the Code Official and to institute remedial action to effect such orders and to accept all service of process pursuant to law. H. Crime Free Training. An Owner or property manager who owns or manages more than one (1) Rental Dwelling in the City must complete a Crime Free Training program (or similar program) approved by the City's Police Department. No renewal license shall be granted unless the Owner (and property manager, if any) identified on the Rental License application has completed such training within the three (3) year period immediately preceding the date of such application. If a Rental Dwelling owned by a person who is not required to complete this training pursuant to the foregoing and that Rental Dwelling is the subject of three (3) or more events of Disorderly Conduct within a three hundred and sixty-five (365) day period, that person must complete the training before a renewal license may be granted for that Rental Dwelling. I. Crime Free/Drug Free Lease Addendum Requirements. 1. Subject to any preemptory state and federal laws, all signed Tenant leases, including any lease renewal, for a Rental Dwelling executed after January 1, 2017, shall contain the following crime free addendum language or equivalent language: a. Tenant, any members of the Tenant's household or a guest or other person affiliated with the Tenant shall not engage in illegal activity, including drug- related illegal activity, on or near the premises. b. Tenant, any member of the Tenant's household or a guest or other person affiliated with the Tenant shall not engage in any act intended to facilitate illegal activity, including drug-related illegal activity, on or near the premises. c. Tenant, any member of the Tenant's household or a guest or other person affiliated with the Tenant shall not permit the Rental Dwelling to be used for, or to facilitate illegal activity, including drug-related illegal activity, regardless of whether the individual engaging in such activity is a member of the household or a guest. d. Tenant, any member of the Tenant's household or a guest, or other person affiliated with the Tenant shall not engage in the unlawful manufacturing, selling, using, storing, keeping, or giving of a controlled substance (as defined in Section 102 of the Controlled Substance Act [21 U.S.C. 802]) on or near the premises. Ordinance No. 564 - continued e. Violation of the above provisions shall be a material and irreparable violation of the lease and good cause for immediate termination of tenancy. f. The term "drug related illegal activity" means the illegal manufacture, sale, distribution, use, or possession with intent to manufacture, sell, distribute, or use of a controlled substance (as defined in Section 102 of the Controlled Substance Act [21 U.S.C. 802]). 2. Non-exclusive remedies. The crime free/drug free addendum is in addition to all other terms of the lease and do not limit or replace any other provisions. J. Posting. All Apartment Buildings shall post the Rental License issued for that building. The Rental License shall be conspicuously posted (in a frame with a glass covering), in a common area, hallway or lobby. All other Rental Dwellings shall have a copy of the Rental License on the premises. K. Applicable Laws. Rental Licenses shall be subject to the applicable provisions of the City Code and state law relating to Rental Dwellings. L. Transfer of License. No Rental License under this Section is transferable. 1. If any Owner holding a Rental License: (a) transfers ownership or legal control of the Rental Dwelling that is the subject of the Rental License; (b) appoints or changes the agent required under Subdivision 4(G) in this Section, and/or (c) authorizes a property manager to manage the Rental Dwelling (other than a property manager identified in the application for the Rental License), then the Owner shall provide the Code Official written notice of such event within seventy- finro (72) hours thereafter. 2. Such notice shall include, as applicable: a. The name and address of the person succeeding to the ownership or control of such Rental Dwelling, b. The name and address of the appointed agent; and c. The name and address of the authorized property manager. Any new Owner shall apply for a new Rental License within three (3) days after its acquisition of the Rental Dwelling. Subdivision 5. Conduct On Licensed Premises It shall be the responsibility of an Owner holding a Rental License to take appropriate action to prevent conduct at the licensed Rental Dwelling by Tenants or their guests constituting Disorderly Conduct. A violation of any of the following statutes or ordinances shall be deemed Disorderly Conduct: A. Minnesota Statutes, Sections 609.75 through 609.76, and City Code Section 10.66, which prohibit gambling; Ordinance No. 564 - continued B. Minnesota Statutes, Sections 609.321 through 609.324, which prohibits prostitution and acts relating thereto; C. Minnesota Statutes, Sections 152.01 through 152.025, and Section 152.027, Subdivisions 1. and 2., which prohibit the unlawful sale or possession of controlled substances; D. Minnesota Statutes, Section 340A.401, which prohibits the unlawful sale of alcoholic beverages; E. Minnesota Statutes, Section 340A.503, which prohibits the underage use of alcoholic beverages; F. Minnesota Statutes, Section 609.72 and City Code 10.60, 10.62, and 10.85 which prohibits Disorderly Conduct when the violation disturbs the peace and quiet of the occupants of at least one (1) unit on the licensed premises or other premises, other than the unit occupied by the person(s) committing the violation; and G. Minnesota Statutes, Sections 97B.021, 97B.045, 609.66 through 609.67 and 624.712 through 624.716 which prohibit the unlawful possession, transportation, sale or use of a weapon. Subdivision 6. Disorderly Conduct Violations A. Disorderly Conduct at a Rental Dwelling shall be determined and handled by the Police Department. B. A determination that Disorderly Conduct has occurred at a Rental Dwelling shall be made upon substantial evidence to support such a determination and shall be subject to Minnesota Statutes, Section 504B.205, subd. 3. It shall not be necessary that criminal charges be brought to support a determination of Disorderly Conduct, nor shall the fact of dismissal or acquittal of such a criminal charge Operate as a bar to adverse license action under this Section based on such Disorderly Conduct. C. Upon notification from the Police Department to the Code Official that there have been three (3) or more events of Disorderly Conduct at a Rental Dwelling with a thirty-six (36) month period, the Code Official shall send a written warning to the Owner of such Rental Dwelling, notifying the Owner that: 1. If there is an additional event of Disorderly Conduct at the identified Rental Dwelling within the twelve (12) month period following the date of the warning, such Disorderly Conduct shall constitute a violation of this Section and shall entitle the City to the remedies set forth herein, including the revocation, suspension, non-renewal or denial of a Rental License; 2. Within ten (10) days after the Code Official's issuance of the written warning, the Owner shall submit to the Code Official and the Police Department, a written management plan detailing the actions taken and proposed to be taken by the Owner to prevent further Disorderly Conduct at the identified Rental Dwelling; Ordinance No. 564 - continued 3. Within twenty (20) days after the acceptance of the management plan by the Code Official and the Police Department, the Owner shall implement all the provisions of the management plan; and 4. If the Owner fails to submit or implement a management plan as required, such failure shall constitute a violation of this Section and shall entitle the City to the remedies set forth herein, including the revocation, suspension, non-renewal or denial of a Rental License. D. If the Owner fails to provide or implement a management plan within the period required, or there is an event of Disorderly Conduct at the Rental Dwelling within twelve (12) months after the written warning, such failure shall be a violation under this Section. Subdivision 7. Revocation or Suspension of Rental License A. In addition to its powers under City Code, Section 6.03, the City Council may revoke, suspend, deny or decline to renew any Rental License applied for or issued under this Section based on any of the following circumstances: 1. The Rental License was procured by misrepresentation of material facts with regard to a Rental Dwelling or the ownership of a Rental Dwelling. 2. The applicant, or one acting in the applicanYs behalf, made oral or written misstatements accompanying the application. 3. The applicant has failed to comply with any condition set forth in any other permits/licenses granted by the City. 4. The activities of the Owner create or have created a danger to the public health, safety or welfare. 5. The Rental Dwelling, the building of which such dwelling is a part, or any portion thereof, contains conditions that might injure, or endanger the safety, health or welfare of any member of the public. 6. Failure to correct violations of the City's Property Maintenance Code in the time period specified in the notice of violation and correction. 7. Failure to continuously comply with any condition required of the applicant for the approval or maintenance of the Rental License. 8. Failure to include the crime free/drug free lease addendum in all leases as required by Subdivision 4(I) of this Section. 9. A violation under Subdivision 6(D) of this Section. 10. Any other violation of this Section. Ordinance No. 564 - continued B. Prior to any revocation, suspension, denial or declination by the City Council under this Section, the Code Official shall send written notice to the Owner specifying the ordinance or law violations with which they are accused and the affected Rental Dwelling. The notice shall also specify the date for the hearing before the City Council, which shall not be less than ten (10) days from the date of the notice. At the hearing before the City Council, the Owner or their representative may submit and present evidence on their behalf. After the hearing, the City Council may revoke, � suspend, deny or decline to renew the Rental License. C. If the affected Rental Dwelling is within a building containing more than one (1) Rental Dwelling owned by the same Owner, the revocation, suspension, denial or declination may apply to one (1) or more Rental Dwellings within that building, at the discretion of the City Council. D. If a Rental License is suspended, revoked or not renewed pursuant to this Section, then until such time as a valid Rental License has been restored it shall be unlawful for the Owner to thereafter permit any occupancy of the formerly licensed Rental Dwelling by a Tenant. The affected Rental Dwelling shall be vacated by all Tenants, giving Tenants a reasonable time to arrange new housing and to move their possessions. E. Rental Licenses may be suspended for up to one hundred twenty (120) days and may, after the period of suspension, be reinstated subject to compliance with this Section and any conditions imposed by the City at the time of suspension. Rental Licenses that are revoked shall not be reinstated for a period of up to one hundred twenty (120) days and until the Owner has applied for and secured a new Rental License and complied with all conditions imposed at the time of revocation and all applicable sections of the City Code. Subdivision 8. Maintenance Standards Every Rental Dwelling shall be maintained in accordance with the minimum standards set forth in state law and the City Code, in addition to any other permits issued by the City or by the state. Subdivision 9. Conflicts Where there are conflicts between this Section and any other provision of the City Code or other state or federal laws, regulations, or rules, the more restrictive shall govern. Subdivision 10. Enforcement The Code Official is hereby authorized and directed to enforce all of the provisions of this Section and all the provisions of the City's Property Maintenance Code with respect to Rental Dwellings. Subdivision 11. Owner and Tenant Responsibilities A. Owner. 1. Owners of Rental Dwellings shall construct and maintain said dwellings in accordance with the requirements of the City Code. Ordinance No. 564 - continued 2. No person shall lease to another for occupancy any Rental Dwelling which does not comply with the applicable fire prevention provisions of the City Code. B. Tenant. 1. Each Tenant of a Rental Dwelling shall keep in a clean and sanitary condition that part of the dwelling and related premises which that person occupies or controls. 2. No person shall occupy any Rental Dwelling which does not comply with the applicable fire prevention provisions of the City Code. Subdivision 12. Notices and Orders of Code Official A. Notice. Whenever the Code Official determines that a Rental Dwelling, a building of which such dwelling is a part, or any portion thereof violates any Section of the City Code or that there are reasonable grounds to believe that a violation exists, notice shall be given in the manner set forth in Section 107 of the City's Property Maintenance Code, provided in all instances such notice shall also be provided to the applicable Owner, if such Section 107 does not require such notice to be sent to the Owner. B. Emergency Orders. Whenever the Code Official finds that an emergency exists in relation to the enforcement of the provisions of this Section which requires immediate action to protect the health, safety or welfare of occupants of any Rental Dwelling, a building of which such dwelling is a part, or any portion thereof, the Code Official may issue an order reciting the existence of such emergency and requiring that such action be taken as deemed necessary to meet the emergency, notwithstanding any other provision of this Section. Subdivision 13. Administrative Citation The Code Official may issue one (1) or more administrative citations under City Code, Section 2.90, to enforce any provision in this Section and, in addition to imposing monetary fines, such citations may require corrective actions. Subdivision 14. Appeal Process Any person directly affected by an administrative citation, decision or order issued by the Code Official pursuant to this Section shall have the right to appeal to a hearing officer in an administrative hearing as provided for in City Code, Section 2.91. The City Council may establish by ordinance a fee that must accompany any such appeal under this Section. Subdivision 15. No Warranty by City By enacting and undertaking to enforce this Section of the City Code, neither the City nor its Council, agents, or employees warrant or guaranty the safety, fitness or suitability of any Rental Dwelling or Dwelling Unit in the City and any representation to the contrary by any person is a misdemeanor. Owners, their agents, property managers and Tenants should take whatever steps they deem appropriate to protect their interests, health, safety and welfare. Ordinance No. 564 - continued Subdivision 16. Violation a Misdemeanor Every person who violates a subdivision, paragraph or provision of this Section when such person performs an act thereby prohibited or declared unlawful or fails to act when such failure is thereby prohibited or declared unlawful, and upon conviction thereof shall be punished as for a misdemeanor except as otherwise stated in specific provisions hereof. Section 2. City Code Chapter 1 entitled "General Provisions and Definitions Applicable to the Entire City Code Including Penalty for Violation" and Section 6.99 entitled "Violation a Misdemeanor" are hereby adopted in their entirety, by reference, as though repeated verbatim herein. Section 3. This Ordinance shall take effect from and after its passage and publication as required by law. Adopt by the City Council this 21St day of July, 2015. /s/Shepard M. Harris Shepard M. Harris, Mayor ATTEST: /s/Kristine A. Luedke Kristine A. Luedke, City Clerk CITY OF GOLDEN VALLEY HENNEPIN COUNTY, MINNESOTA SUMMARY OF ORDINANCE NO. 564, 2ND SERIES AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE CITY CODE Adding Section 6.29: Licensing Of Rental Housing This is a summary of the provisions of the above Ordinance which has been approved for publication by the City Council. This ordinance amends Chapter 6 with the addition of Section 6.29: Licensing of Rental Housing. This Section provides for the licensing of rental housing in the City of Golden Valley. Among other things, the Section sets forth: the application procedures for a rental license; inspection and maintenance requirements related to rental housing; the requirement that certain owners and property managers of rental housing participate in crime free training; the requirement that the leases of rental housing, signed after January 1, 2017, contain certain provisions related to tenant conduct; penalties for disorderly conduct at rental housing properties and other violations of the provisions of the Section; the minimum responsibilities for owners and tenants of rental housing; and procedures for an appeal of a decision or order of the City with respect rental licensing. The ordinance shall take effect upon publication. NOTICE: The foregoing is only a summary of the ordinance A printed copy of the full text of the ordinance is available for inspection by any person during regular office hours at the office of the City Clerk. Adopted by the City Council this 21St day of July, 2015. /s/Shepard M. Harris Shepard M. Harris, Mayor ATTEST: /s/Kristine A. Luedke Kristine A. Luedke, City Clerk t"t��1 t�� ""'; � �� ��2 �� Fire De artment � ��r - - p - - 763 593 8079/763 593 8098(fax) Executive Summary For Action Golden Valley City Council Meeting July 21, 2015 Agenda Item 3. I. Second Consideration - Amendment to City Code Regarding Administrative Citations Prepared By John Crelly, Fire Chief Rick Hammerschmidt, Deputy Fire Chief Summary At the June 9, 2015, Council/Manager meeting, staff presented Council with amendments to the City Code to expand the use of administrative fines. Council requested that staff proceed with the amendment changes. First consideration of this ordinance was presented at the July 7, 2015, Council Meeting. Currently administrative fines are used effectively with the enforcement of the Housing Maintenance Code and the amendments would expand it to all sections of the City Code. Under the new ordinance, staff recommended that the City use an Administrative Hearing Officer for any appeals to a citations. Attachments • Ordinance #565, addition of New Sections 2.90: Administrative Citations and 2.91 Administrative Hearing Procedures and Amending Sections 2.14: Right to Administrative Appeal, 4.20: Sign Permits and Regulations, 5.02: Applications and Licenses - Procedure and Administration, 6.03: Action on Application, Transfer, Termination, and Duplicate License, 6.34: Tobacco and Section 10.53: Graffiti (9 pages) • Summary of Ordinance #565, addition of New Sections 2.90: Administrative Citations and 2.91 Administrative Hearing Procedures and Amending Sections 2.14: Right to Administrative Appeal, 4.20: Sign Permits and Regulations, 5.02: Applications and Licenses - Procedure and Administration, 6.03: Action on Application, Transfer, Termination, and Duplicate License, 6.34: Tobacco and Section 10.53: Graffiti (2 pages) Recommended Action Motion to adopt second consideration Ordinance#565, amending the City Code regarding Administrative Citations. Motion to approve Summary of Ordinance #565 for publication. ORDINANCE NO. 565, 2ND SERIES AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE CITY CODE REGARDING ADMINISTRATIVE CITATIONS Addition of New Sections 2.90: Administrative Citations and 2.91 Administrative Hearing Procedures Amending Sections 2.14: Right to Administrative Appeal, 4.20: Sign Permits and Regulations, 5.02: Applications and Licenses - Procedure and Administration, 6.03: Action on Application, Transfer, Termination, and Duplicate License, 6.34: Tobacco and 10.53: Graffiti The City Council for the City of Golden Valley hereby ordains as follows: Section 1. City Code, Chapter 2 is hereby amended by adding a new Section 2.90, entitled "Administrative Citations," reading as follows: Section 2.90: Administrative Citations Subdivision 1. Purpose The City Council finds that there is a need for alternative methods of enforcing the City Code. While criminal fines and penalties have been the most frequent enforcement mechanism, there are certain negative consequences for both the City and the accused. The delay inherent in that system does not ensure prompt resolution. The higher burden of proof and the potential of incarceration do not appear appropriate for most Code violations; and the criminal process does not always regard City Code violations as being important. Accordingly, the City Council finds that the use of administrative citations and the imposition of civil penalties is a legitimate and necessary alternative method of enforcement that will be a cost effective and expeditious alternative to traditional criminal fines and penalties. Administrative citations are in addition to any other legal remedy which may be pursued for City Code violations and the City, in its discretion, may choose not to initiate the administrative citation and procedures set forth in this Section, and may bring criminal charges or seek any other remedy or penalty permitted under the City Code or other applicable law in the first or succeeding instances. Subdivision 2. Scope A. The administrative procedures and penalties in this Section may be used for any violation of the City Code, or any violation of the terms and conditions of a City approval, including permits and licenses, required and granted under the City Code. Except as expressly provided in this Section, the provisions of this Section may be used concurrently with or in addition to any other procedure or remedy, criminal or civil, the City may pursue under City Code, state law, or federal law. Nothing herein restricts the right of the City to enter property immediately or to seek other remedies in emergency or other situations as authorized by City Code, state law, or federal law. Where differences occur befinreen provisions of this Section and other applicable City Code Sections, this Section controls to the extent of such differences. No provision of the City Code that provides a criminal procedure or penalty, or an administration or civil procedure or penalty, for a violation of the City Code shall preclude the application of this Section in its entirety to such violation. B. The penalties and procedures provided in this Section shall be applicable to every Section and chapter of the City Code, the same as though this Section were a part of each separate Section and chapter. Ordinance No. 565 - continued C. It is the intention of the City Council that the penalties and procedures provided by this Section shall apply to any amendment of the City Code, whether or not such penalty is reenacted in the amendatory ordinance, unless otherwise provided in the amendatory ordinance. D. Section 2.12, Subdivision 3, of the City Code shall not apply to this Section. Subdivision 3. General Provisions A. A violation of a provision of the City Code, or a violation of the terms and conditions of a City approval, including permits and licenses, required and granted under the City Code, is an administrative offense that may be subject to an administrative citation and civil penalties set forth herein; provided an administrative offense shall not include any such violation subject to the Uniform Traffic Regulations Act in Chapter 169 of the Minnesota Statutes. B. Unless expressly provided otherwise in the City Code, each day a violation exists constitutes a separate administrative offense. C. The City Council shall adopt by ordinance a schedule of penalties for offenses that may be initiated by administration citation. D. The City Council may adopt by resolution a schedule of fees to be paid to administrative hearing officers for his or her services. E. The maximum monetary penalty for a single administrative offense may not exceed the maximum monetary fine authorized by state law for misdemeanor offenses or the maximum monetary penalty authorized by state law for an administrative process; provided for purposes of determining the amount of the monetary penalty the cost of any required compliance actions and any consequences of a revoked or suspended license shall not be included. F. The City Manager or his/her designee is authorized to promulgate rules and forms to implement the procedures herein. Subdivision 4. Administrative Citation. A. Any person with authority to enforce the City Code may, upon a reasonable belief that there has been a violation thereof (or a violation of the terms and conditions of a City approval, including permits and licenses, required and granted under the City Code) issue an administrative citation to the violator or party responsible for the violation in one of the following ways: 1. By personal service upon the owner of the property or an occupant of suitable age residing at the property where the violation occurred, or in the case of a business or corporation, the citation may be served upon a manager on the premises or to a corporate officer; 2. By first class mail to a person identified in Subdivision 4(A)(1); 3. By posting the citation in a conspicuous place on or near the main entrance when it reasonably appears the property is occupied but the occupants are not available or willing to accept personal service, and where the property is not a licensed rental dwelling; Ordinance No. 565 - continued 4. By posting the citation in a conspicuous place on or near the main entrance and mailing by first class mail a notice of the citation to the owner of record where it reasonably appears the property is vacant or abandoned; or 5. By posting the citation in a conspicuous place on or near the main entrance and mailing by first class mail, notice of the citation to the licensee when the property is a rental dwelling licensed by the City B. The administrative citation shall state the nature, location, date, and time of the violation, provide a citation to the Section of the City Code violated, identify the person issuing the administrative citation, the civil penalty, where, by when and in what manner any fine must be paid, a brief description of the process to contest, required compliance or abatement actions (if applicable) and any other information the City Manager or his/her designee deems applicable. C. If the City seeks to impose more than one (1) penalty for a continuing violation, a separate citation shall be issued for each violation date. Subdivision 5. Responding to an Administrative Citation A. A party who has received an administrative citation must, within twenty (20) days after the administrative citation is issued, pay the amount of any fine set forth therein or, if the party desires to contest the administrative citation, request a hearing as set forth in Subdivision 9 of this Section. B. Any fine may be paid in person at City Hall, by mail or by other method set forth in the administrative citation. C. Payment of any fine shall be deemed a final admission of the violation and thereafter the City shall not bring a criminal charge for the same violation. D. Payment of any fine shall not excuse the failure to satisfy any compliance orders referenced in the administrative citation and such payment shall not bar further enforcement activity by the City for a continuing violation, including without limitation the issuance of additional administrative citations. Subdivision 6. Recovery of Civil Fines A. If a fine imposed by an administrative citation is not paid within the time specified, it constitutes: 1. A personal obligation of the violator; and 2. A lien upon the real property upon which the violation occurred if the property or improvements on the property were the subject of the violation and the property owner was responsible for that violation. B. A lien may be assessed against the property and collected in the same manner as taxes. The lien may include the administrative and legal costs incurred by the City in connection with collecting the unpaid administrative penalty. C. A personal obligation may be collected by any appropriate legal means. Ordinance No. 565 - continued D. A late payment fee of ten percent (10%) of the fine amount will be assessed for each thirty (30) day period, or part thereof, that the fine remains unpaid after the due date. E. During the time that a fine remains unpaid, no City approval will be granted for a license, permit, or other City approval sought by the violator or for property under the violator's ownership or control. F. Failure to pay a fine is grounds for suspending, revoking, denying, or not renewing a license or permit associated with the violation. G. Upon failure to pay the fine within the time specified, the City may elect to charge the initial violation as a petty misdemeanor or misdemeanor charge, and the administrative offense procedure set forth in this Section shall no longer apply to such violation. H. This foregoing of this Subdivision 6 shall be an additional remedy and not in lieu of any other penalty provided for in City Code or state law. Subdivision 7. Optional Procedure The City, in its sole discretion, may choose not to utilize the administrative citations and procedures provided for under this Section for any violation of the City Code and may instead bring criminal charges or any other remedy (including civil fines) permitted by the City Code, state law or federal law. In the event a party participates in the administrative citation procedures set forth in this Section, but does not comply with the civil penalty imposed and the party is not otherwise absolved of the administrative offense, the City may seek to collect the costs of the administrative offense procedure including without limitation the City's attorney fees and cost as part of a subsequent criminal sentence in the event the party is charged and is found guilty of the violation. Subdivision 8. Disposition of Penalties All civil fines collected pursuant to this Section shall be paid to the City and deposited into the general fund. Subdivision 9. Appeal Process A. Any person directly affected by an administrative citation issued pursuant to this Section shall have the right to appeal to a hearing officer as provided for in Section 2.91 of the City Code. B. The failure to pay the fine or request a hearing within finrenty (20) days after the citation, or the failure to attend the hearing, constitutes a waiver of the violator's rights to an administrative hearing and is an admission of the violation. A hearing officer may waive this resutt upon good cause shown. Examples of "good cause": death or incapacitating illness of the accused; a court order requiring the accused to appear for another hearing at the same time; and lack of proper service of the citation or notice of the hearing. "Good cause" does not include forgetfulness and intentional delay. C. If the final adjudication of the administrative citation under the appeal procedure is a finding of no violation, then the City may not prosecute a criminal violation based on the same set of facts. This does not preclude the City from pursuing a criminal conviction for a violation of the same provision based on a different set of facts. A different date of violation will constitute a different set of facts. Ordinance No. 565 - continued D. The City will not be obligated to reimburse for any costs undertaken pursuant to a compliance order, even if it is determined, after an appeal hearing, that there was no violation as charged in the administrative citation. Subdivision 10. Failure to Pay is Separate Violation. The following are separate violations of the City Code, punishable as misdemeanors in accordance with state law: A. Unless a notice of appeal has been timely filed, failure to pay the civil fine within the time required after issuance of an administrative citation. B. Failure, without good cause, to appear at a hearing which was scheduled under Subdivision 9; and C. Failure to pay a fine imposed by a hearing officer within thirty (30) days after it was imposed, or such other time as may be established by the hearing officer, unless the judicial review has been sought for the matter in accordance with state law. Section 2. City Code, Chapter 2 is hereby amended by adding a new Section 2.91, entitled "Administrative Hearing Procedures," reading as follows: Section 2.91 : Administrative Hearing Procedures Subdivision 1. Administrative Hearings A. Where the City Code entitles a person to an administrative hearing this Section shall apply and Section 2.14 of the City Code shall not apply. B. A person wishing to exercise their right to an administrative hearing shall file a notice of appeal with the City Clerk. The notice of appeal must be filed with the City Clerk on the form prescribed by the City Manager or his/her designee within twenty (20) days after issuance of the administrative citation, notice or order that is to be the subject of the hearing. If required by the Section of the City Code granting the right to the administrative hearing or the City's master fee schedule, the notice shall be accompanied by the applicable filing fee. C. The City Council shall periodically approve a list of persons, from which the City Manager or his/her designee will randomly select a hearing officer to hear and determine a matter for which a hearing is requested. D. The appellant has the right to request, no tater than ten (10) days before the date of the hearing, that the assigned hearing officer be removed from the case. One (1) such request for each case will be granted automatically by the City Manager or his/her designee. A subsequent request must be directed to the assigned hearing officer who will decide whether the hearing officer can fairly and objectively review the case. If such a finding is made, the City Manager or designated agent must assign another hearing officer. The hearing officer is not a judicial officer but is a public officer as defined by Minnesota Statutes, Section 609.415. The hearing officer must not be an employee of the City. The City Manager or his/her designee must establish a procedure for evaluating the competency of hearing officers, including comments from citizens and City staff. Ordinance No. 565 - continued E. Upon the hearing officer's own initiative or upon written request of an interested party demonstrating the need, the officer may issue a subpoena for the attendance of a witness or the production of books, papers, records or other documents that are material to the matter being heard. The party requesting the subpoena is responsible for serving the subpoena in the manner provided for civil actions and for paying the fees and expenses of any witness. A person served with a subpoena may file an objection with the hearing officer promptly but no later than the time specified in the subpoena for compliance. The officer may cancel or modify the subpoena if it is unreasonable or oppressive. A person who, without just cause, fails or refuses to attend and testify or to produce the required documents in obedience to a subpoena is guilty of a misdemeanor. Alternatively, the party requesting the subpoena may seek an order from district court directing compliance. F. The City shall schedule the hearing to occur within thirty (30) days of the City receiving a request for a hearing in the form prescribed by the City Manager. Notice of the hearing must be served on the person responsible for the violation at least fourteen (14) days in advance of the hearing, unless a shorter time is accepted by all parties. Service of the notice will be by first class mail and will be complete upon mailing. At the hearing, the parties will have the opportunity to present testimony and question any witnesses, but strict rules of evidence will not apply. The hearing officer must record the hearing and receive testimony and exhibits, and keep a record of documentary evidence submitted. The officer must receive and give weight to evidence, including hearsay evidence that possesses probative value commonly accepted by reasonable and prudent people in the conduct of their affairs. G. The hearing officer must: 1. determine whether the City has established by a preponderance of the evidence that, as applicable, a violation of the City Code, or a violation of the terms and conditions of a City approval, including permits and licenses, required and granted under the City Code, has occurred; 2. determine whether the corrective action and/or administrative decision resulting from the alleged violation is reasonable; and 3. affirm, vacate or modify the City's administrative decision regarding the alleged violation and/or corrective action. H. The hearing officer has the authority to reduce, stay, or waive a scheduled penalty either unconditionally or upon compliance with appropriate conditions. The hearing officer may increase the scheduled fine when the actual costs of enforcement are shown by a preponderance of the evidence to be greater than the amount of the scheduled fine. I. When imposing a penalty for a violation, the hearing officer may consider any or all of the following factors: 1. The duration of the violation; 2. The frequency or recurrence of the violation; Ordinance No. 565 - continued 3. The seriousness of the violation; 4. The history of the violation; 5. The violator's conduct after issuance of the notice of hearing; 6. The good faith effort by the violator to comply; 7. The economic impact of the penalty on the violator; 8. The impact of the violation upon the community; and 9. Any other factors appropriate to a just result. J. The hearing officer may exercise discretion to impose a fine for more than one (1) day of a continuing violation, but only upon a finding that the violation caused a serious threat of harm to the public health, safety, or welfare or that the accused intentionally and the unreasonably refused to comply with the City Code requirement. K. The hearing officer's decision and supporting reasons must be in writing, and shall include: the hearing officer's decision, the factual and legal basis for the determination; the corrective action required, if any; the date and time by which corrective action must be taken; and the penalty assessed, if any. The hearing officer shall mail a copy of the decision to the appellant. Subdivision 2. Appeal from an Administrative Hearing The decision of the hearing officer is final without any further right of administrative appeal. An aggrieved party may obtain judicial review of the decision of the hearing officer in accordance with state law. Section 3. City Code Section 2.14 is hereby amended and restated in its entirety as follows: If any person shall be aggrieved by any administrative decision of the City Manager or any other City official, or any Board or Commission not having within its structure an appellate procedure, such aggrieved person is entitled to a full hearing before the Council upon serving a written request therefor upon the City Manager at least ten (10) days prior to any regular Council meeting. Such request shall contain a general statement setting forth the administrative decision to be challenged by the appellant. At such hearing the appellant may present any evidence the appellant deems pertinent to the appeal, but the City shall not be required to keep a verbatim record of the proceedings. This Section shall not apply if the aggrieved person has the right to an administrative hearing under Section 2.91 of the City Code. Section 4. City Code Section 4.20 Subdivision 15 is hereby deleted in its entirely: Section 5. City Code Section 5.02 Subdivision 5(F) is hereby amended and restated in its entirety as follows: Ordinance No. 565 - continued Any of the foregoing civil penalties may be imposed by an administrative citation under City Code, Section 2.90, or in the alternative by action of the Council. If one (1) of the foregoing penalties is imposed by an action of the Council, no fine, suspension or revocation shall take effect until the licensee has been afforded an opportunity for a hearing before the Council or a committee of the Council, as may be determined by the Council in action calling the hearing. Such hearing shall be called by the Council upon written notice to the licensee served in person or by certified mail not less than fifteen (15) nor more than thirty (30) days prior to the hearing date, stating the time, place and purpose thereof. The licensee may agree to such fine, suspension or revocation imposed by an action of the Council without a hearing by providing the City Manager with a written notice of hearing waiver and acceptance of penalty. In lieu of the civil penalties and license suspensions imposed above, whether imposed by administrative citation or an action of the Council, the licensee may choose to surrender the license to sell alcohol for a minimum period of twelve (12) months from the date of license surrender. Section 6. City Code Section 6.03 Subdivision 4 is hereby amended and restated in its entirety as follows: The Council may, for any reasonable cause, refuse to grant any application, or revoke or suspend any license. No license shall be granted to a person of questionable moral character or business reputation. Before revocation or suspension of any license, the Council sha�l give notice to the licensee and grant such licensee opportunity to be heard. Notice to be given and the exact time of hearing shall be stated in the resolution calling for such hearing. The Police Department shall provide the Council with a report on compliance and illegal conduct by the applicant. Grounds for revocation or suspension may be, but are not limited to, any of the following: A. That the licensee suffered or permitted illegal acts, or acts prohibited under Chapter 6 of the City Code, upon the licensed premises; B. That the licensee had knowledge of such illegal or prohibited acts but failed to report the same to police; C. That the licensee failed or refused to cooperate fully with police in investigating such alleged illegal or prohibited acts; or, D. That the activities of the licensee created a serious danger to public health, safety, or welfare. Section 7. City Code Section 6.34 Subdivision 13(C) is hereby amended and restated in its entirety as follows: C. Administrative Penalty Procedure. Notwithstanding anything to the contrary in this Subdivision 13: 1. Any of the administrative civil penalties set forth in this Subdivision 13 that may be imposed by the Council, may in the alternative be imposed by an administrative citation under City Code, Section 2.90. Ordinance No. 565 - continued 2. If one of the foregoing penalties is imposed by an action of the Council, no penalty shall take effect until the licensee or person has received notice (served personally or by mail) of the alleged violation and of the opportunity for a hearing before the Council, and such notice must be in writing and must provide that a right to a hearing before the Council must be requested within ten (10) business days of receipt of the notice or such right shall terminate. Section 8. City Code Section 10.53 Subdivision 7 is hereby amended and restated in its entirety as follows: Cost Recovery. The owner of property on which a nuisance has been abated by the City, or a person who has caused a public nuisance on property not owned by that person, is personally liable to the City for the cost of the abatement, including administrative costs. As soon as the work has been completed and the cost determined, an appropriate official will prepare a bill for the cost and mail it to the owner or other responsible party. The amount is immediately due and payable to the City. Section 9. City Code Chapter 1 entitled "General Provisions and Definitions Applicable to the Entire City Code Including Penalty for Violation" and Section 2.99, Section 4.99, Section 5.99, Section 6.99 and Section 10.99 entitled "Violation a Misdemeanor" are hereby adopted in their entirety, by reference, as though repeated verbatim herein. Section 10. This Ordinance shall take effect from and after its passage and publication as required by law. Adopt by the City Council this 7�h day of July, 2015. /s/Shepard M. Harris Shepard M. Harris, Mayor ATTEST: /s/Kristine A. Luedke Kristine A. Luedke, City Clerk CITY OF GOLDEN VALLEY HENNEPIN COUNTY, MINNESOTA SUMMARY OF ORDINANCE NO. 565, 2ND SERIES AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE CITY CODE Addition of New Sections 2.90: Administrative Citations and 2.91 Administrative Hearing Procedures Amending Sections 2.14: Right to Administrative Appeal, 4.20: Sign Permits and Regulations, 5.02: Applications and Licenses - Procedure and Administration, 6.03: Action on Application, Transfer, Termination, and Duplicate License, 6.34: Tobacco and 10.53: Graffiti This is a summary of the provisions of the above Ordinance which has been approved for publication by the City Council. This ordinance amends Chapter 2, with the addition of Section 2.90, Administrative Citations, and Section 2.91, Administrative Hearing Procedures. Section 2.90 permits the City to enforce violations of the City Code using an administrative citation process. The administrative penalty for a particular violation of the City Code will be set forth in a schedule of penalties to be adopted by the City Council in a separate ordinance. The Section further provides the procedures for the issuance of administrative citations by the City, the requirement that the recipient of an administrative citation respond within 20 days after the issuance of the citation, the process for compliance with the administrative citation, and the procedure for the appeal of an administrative citation through the administrative hearing process. In addition, the Section sets forth the penalties for the failure to comply with an administrative citation. Section 2.91 establishes the procedures for administrative hearings where the City Code entitles a person to such a hearing. The Section sets forth the process for requesting a hearing, how the hearing is schedule, how the hearing officer is selected, the procedures used in the hearing, the obligations of the hearing officer, and the procedure for appealing the decision of a hearing officer. As a consequence of the addition of Section 2.90 and Section 2.91, this Ordinance also amends the following Sections of the City Code: • Section 2.14 is amended to specify that the appellate procedure before the City Council set forth in Section 2.14 does not apply if the appeal process set forth in the new Section 2.91 applies. • Section 4.20, Subdivision 15, which provides an administrative citation process with respect to sign permits and related regulations, is deleted in favor of the new administrative citation process under Section 2.90. • Section 5.02, Subdivision 5(F), is amended to clarify that the penalties set forth in Section 5.02 regarding liquor regulation, may be imposed via an administrative citation under the new Section 2.90. • Section 6.03, Subdivision 4, which permits administrative fines with respect to licenses issued by the City, is deleted in favor of the new administrative citation process under Section 2.90. • Section 6.34, Subdivision 13(C), is amended to clarify that the civil penalties set forth in Section 6.34 regarding tobacco regulation, may be imposed via administrative citation under the new Section 2.90. • Section 10.53, Subdivision 7, which provides an administrative citation process with respect to graffiti, is amended so that the new administrative citation process in Section 2.90 applies to Section 10.53. The ordinance shall take effect upon publication. NOTICE: The foregoing is only a summary of the ordinance A printed copy of the full text of the ordinance is available for inspection by any person during regular office hours at the office of the City Clerk. Adopted by the City Council this 21St day of July, 2015. /s/Shepard M. Harris Shepard M. Harris, Mayor ATTEST: /s/Kristine A. Luedke Kristine A. Luedke, City Clerk 4 L�"j/ ll� k4?w"r �rr.:'i-:::. i �►l���t � ��,. ��,� Administrative Services Department 763 593 8013/763 593 3969(fax) Executive Summary For Action Golden Valley City Council Meeting July 21, 2015 Agenda Item 3. 1. Second Consideration -Amendment to the 2015 Master Fee Schedule for Administrative Fines, Citations and Mobile Food Vending Prepared By Sue Virnig, Finance Director John Crelly, Fire Chief Emily Goellner, Assistant Planner/Grant Writer Summary Council had directed staff to do additional research after the first consideration. Staff is recommending the following fees to be reviewed for second consideration of Ordinance#566 and will provide amendments to the 2015 Master Fee Schedule. With the approval to the ordinance change for Mobile Food Vending, language changes need to be considered. The following changes are to be considered: Term Food Trucks needs to be changed to Mobile Food Vending and the following fees to be added: MOBI'LE FOOD VENDING CODE FEE SECTION City Parks $40 - Up to 3 days Non- Residential Zoning District $40 per day for up to 3 days $150 for up to 120 days. With the approval of Administrative Citations, Licensing of Rental Housing and International Property maintenance ordinances the below chart will be added to the 2015 Mater Fee Schedule. OFFENSE DESCRIPTION CODE' PENALTY SECTION Any violation of Chapter 1 For any violation 1S' Citation: $100.00 through 12 of the City Code, of the City Code, 2nd Citation within 12 month period: $250.00 inclusive not specifically listed not otherwise in this schedule. listed in this 3�d Citation within 12 month period: $500.00 schedule 4tn & Subsequent Citations within 12 month period: $500.00 A violation of City Section 3.30, Sec. 3.30, Subd. The penalties set forth in Section 3.30, Subdivision 3.E., regard sump 3.E. Subdivision 3.E., of the City Code. pumps. An owner refuses an inspection Sec. 3.30, Subd. The penalties set forth in Section 3.30, or fails to discontinue permitted 4 Subdivision 4, of the City Code. discharge of clean water into the sanitary sewer system as required under City Code, Section 3.30, Subdivision 4. Any violation of City Code, Sec. 4.32, Subd. The penalties set forth in Section 4.32, Section 4.32, Subdivision 3.J.2. Subdivision 3.J.2. of the City Code. 3.J.2., regarding tree preservation plans. Any violation of Chapter 5 of Chapter 5. The penalties set forth in Subdivision 5.F. of the City Code regarding Section 5.02 of the City Code. alcoholic beverages. Any violation of City Code, Sec. 6.34. The penalties set forth in Subdivision 13 of Section 6.34, regarding Section 6.34 of the City Code. tobacco. Any violation of City Code, Sec. 7.18, Subd. The penalties set forth in Subdivision 2 of Section 7.18, Subdivision 2, 2. Section 7.18 of the City Code. regarding right-of-way permits. Parking without permit in area Sec. 9.11, Subd. $25 needing permit. 7. Attachments • Ordinance#566, Amendments to the 2015 Master Fee Schedule for Mobile Food Vending, Administrative Citations, and International Property Maintenance Code (2 pages) Recommended Action Motion to adopt second consideration, Ordinance #566, Amendments to the 2015 Master Fee Schedule for Mobile Food Vending, Administrative Citations, and International Property Maintenance Code. ORDINANCE NO. 566, 2ND SERIES AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE CITY CODE Amending the 2015 Master Fee Schedule by for Mobile Food Vending, Administrative Citations, and International Property Maintenance Code The City Council for the City of Golden Valley hereby ordains: Section 1. The 2015 Master Fee Schedule in Chapter 25 of the City Code is hereby amended by adding the following new Administrative Citation Penalties fees: OFFENSE DESCRIPTION CODE SECTION PENALTY Any violation of Chapter 1 For any violation of 1St Citation: $100.00 through 12 of the City Code, the City Code, not 2"d Citation within 12 month period: $250.00 inclusive not specifically listed in otherwise listed in 3�d Citation within 12 month period: $500.00 this schedule. this schedule 4th & Subsequent Citations within 12 month period: $500.00 A violation of City Section 3.30, Sec. 3.30, Subd. The penalties set forth in Section 3.30, Subdivision 3.E., regard sump 3.E. Subdivision 3.E., of the City Code. pumps. An owner refuses an inspection Sec. 3.30, Subd. 4 The penalties set forth in Section 3.30, or fails to discontinue permitted Subdivision 4, of the City Code. discharge of clean water into the sanitary sewer system as required under City Code, Section 3.30, Subdivision 4. Any violation of City Code, Sec. 4.32, Subd. The penalties set forth in Section 4.32, Section 4.32, Subdivision 3.J.2., 3.J.2. Subdivision 3.J.2. of the City Code. regarding tree preservation plans. Any violation of Chapter 5 of the Chapter 5. The penalties set forth in Subdivision 5.F. of City Code regarding alcoholic Section 5.02 of the City Code. beverages. Any violation of City Code, Sec. 6.34. The penalties set forth in Subdivision 13 of Section 6.34, regarding tobacco. Section 6.34 of the City Code. Any violation of City Code, Sec. 7.18, Subd. 2. The penalties set forth in Subdivision 2 of Section 7.18, Subdivision 2, Section 7.18 of the City Code. regarding right-of-way permits. Parking without permit. Sec. 9.11, Subd. 7. $25 Section 2. The 2015 Master Fee Schedule in Chapter 25 of the City Code is hereby amended by revising the following: Ordinance No. 566 - continued MOBILE FOOD VENDING CODE SECTION FEE City Parks $40 - Up to 3 days Non- Residential Zoning District $40 per day for up to 3 days $150 for up to 120 days. Section 3. City Code Chapter 1 entitled "General Provisions and Definitions Applicable to the Entire City Code Including Penalty for Violation" is hereby adopted in its entirety, by reference, as though repeated verbatim herein. Adopted by the City Council this 21St day of July, 2015. /s/Shepard M. Harris Shepard M. Harris, Mayor ATTEST: /s/Kristine A. Luedke Kristine A. Luedke, City Clerk t'l�'�' t7 f ,5�:: .�# :.�k�. � � � ��� � � �.� Plannin De artment �+�. �� - - g p - 763 593 8095/763-593 8109(fax) � ._ � ., _. ,. �.x _ - ._� � ° : � Executive Summary For Action Golden Valley City Council Meeting July 21, 2015 Agenda Item 3. K. Approval of Plat - Sweeney Lake Woods PUD No. 120 and Authorization to Sign PUD Permit and PUD Development Agreement - Sweeney Lake Woods PUD No. 120 Prepared By Jason Zimmerman, Planning Manager Summary At the March 3, 2015, City Council meeting, the Council held a public hearing on the Final PUD Plan for Sweeney Lake Woods. After the hearing the Council approved the Final Plan. The Final Plat, PUD Permit and PUD Development Agreement have been prepared for consideration. City staff has reviewed the documents and finds them to be consistent with the approved Final PUD Plan and the requirements of City Code. Attachments • PUD Permit- Sweeney Lake Woods PUD No. 120 (3 pages) • PUD Development Agreement - Sweeney Lake Woods PUD No. 120 (10 pages) • Resolution for Approval of Plat - Sweeney Lake Woods PUD No. 120 (1 page) • Final Plat - Sweeney Lake Woods PUD No. 120 (1 page) Recommended Action Motion to adopt Resolution for Approval of Plat - Sweeney Lake Woods PUD No. 120. Motion to authorize the Mayor and City Manager to sign the PUD Permit and Development Agreement for Sweeney Lake Woods PUD No. 120. Sweeney Lake Woods P.U.D. No. 120 City Council Approval: March 3, 2015 City of Golden Valley, Minnesota Use Permit for Planned Unit Development Project Name: Sweeney Lake Woods P.U.D. No. 120 Location: 1801 Noble Drive, Golden Valley, Minnesota Legal Description: Lots 1, 2 and 3, Block 1, and Outlot A, Sweeney Lake Woods P.U.D. No. 120, Hennepin County, MN Applicant: The Lecy Group Address: 2640 N. Saunders Lake Drive, Minnetrista, MN 55364 Owner: The Lecy Group Address: 2640 N. Saunders Lake Drive, Minnetrista, MN 55364 Zoning District: Single Family Residential (R-1) Permitted Uses: The PUD Permit allows for the construction of three single-family residential homes with a shared private driveway and cul-de-sac. Components: A. Land Use 1. The plans prepared by Civil Site Group, received January 9, 2015, shall become a part of this approval. 2. A park dedication fee in the amount of $13,920, or 2% of the land market value with credit for one unit, shall be paid prior to release of the Final Plat. 3. The riparian buffer strip along the delineated wetland shall be 10 feet in width. 4. The Final Plat shall include "P.U.D. No. 120" in its title. Sweeney Lake Woods P.U.D. No. 120 Page 2 B. Construction 1. The recommendations and requirements outlined in the memo from the Fire Department to Jason Zimmerman, Planning Manager, dated February 2, 2015, shall become a part of this approval. 2. No additional driveway or utility access shall be allowed along the private driveway without a PUD Amendment, except for Lot 2, Block 1, Hanson Wood Shores. 3. All signs on the property must meet the requirements of the City's sign code. C. Grading, Utilities, Access and Other Engineering Issues 1. The recommendation and requirements outlined in the memo from the Engineering Division to Jason Zimmerman, Planning Manager, dated February 5, 2015, shall become a part of this approval. D. Subdivision 1. Proof of filing of the plat shall take the form of a certified copy of the fully recorded plat, or a receipt from the County specifically noting that the applicant has paid for such a copy to be sent to the City when it becomes available. It is hereby understood and agreed that this P.U.D. Permit is a part of the City Council approval granted on March 3, 2015. Any changes to the PUD Permit for Sweeney Lake Woods P.U.D. No. 120 shall require an amendment. The Lecy Group Witness: By: Title: Date: Sweeney Lake Woods P.U.D. No. 120 Page 3 CITY OF GOLDEN VALLEY Witness: By: Shepard M. Harris, Mayor Date: Witness: By: Thomas D. Burt, City Manager Date: Warning: This permit is subject to all other state, federal, and local ordinances, regulations, or laws with authority over this development. DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENT Sweeney Lake Woods P.U.D. #120 AGREEMENT dated this day of , 2015, by and between the City of Goiden Valley, a Minnesota municipal corporation (the "City"), and The Lecy Group (the "Developer"). 1. Request for Development Approval. The Developer has asked the City to approve a Planned Unit Development (PUD 120) known as Sweeney Lake Woods, which land is legally described on Attachment One, attached hereto and hereby made a part hereof (hereinafter referred to as the "Subject Property"). 2. Conditions of Development Approval. The City has approved the Planned Unit Development on the following conditions: a. The plans prepared by Civil Site Group, received January 9, 2015, shall become a part of this approval. b. The recommendations and requirements outlined in the memo from the Fire Department to lason Zimmerman, Planning Manager, dated February 2, 2015, shall become a part of this approval. c. The recommendations and requirements outlined in the memo from the Engineering Division to Jason Zimmerman, Planning Manager, dated February 5, 2015, shall become a part of this approval. d. The riparian buffer strip along the delineated wetland shall be 10 feet in width. e. No additional driveway or utility access shall be allowed along the private driveway without a PUD Amendment, except for Lot 2, Block 1, Hanson Wood Shores. f. A park dedication fee of$13,920, or 2% of the land value with credit for one unit, shall be paid before release of the Final Plat. g. The Final Plat shall include "P.U.D. No. 120" in its title. h. This approval is subject to all other state, federal, and local ordinances, regulations, or laws with authority over this development. i. The Developer shall pay all required fees and costs incurred by the City related to the review and processing of the PUD application, including legal and professional consulting costs. 3. Additional Obli�ations of Developer. a. The Developer must submit the homeowners association governing documents (including the declaration of covenants, conditions, restrictions or easements)to the City for review and approval prior to recording, and must submit copies of final documents upon recording. b. The Developer must submit final construction drawing plans for review and approval by the City Engineer before any site permits can be issued. c. The private shared driveway and cul-de-sac must be designed and constructed by the Developer to a minimum seven (7) ton per axle capacity, and final construction plans must include design calculations and typical street sections. d. The private shared driveway will be owned and maintained by the Developer and/or future homeowners association. Maintenance of the shared driveway must include pavement preservation and replacement, as well as street sweeping and snow removal. e. The Developer must dedicate all required drainage and utility easements and show and label the 100-year flood elevation contour on the final plat. f. The Developer must dedicate permanent conservation easements over the wetlands and shoreline areas adjacent to Sweeney Lake, and establish vegetation buffers, as discussed in the Engineering Division review dated February 5, 2015. g. The Developer must design the public utilities according to City standards and specifications and submit the final construction plans for review and comment. The plans must include drawings showing plan and profile views. h. The final utility construction plans must be modified to show the location of proposed underground private utilities (using joint trench construction methods). i. The Developer, or its agent, shall obtain a sanitary sewer inflow and infiltration Certificate of Compliance for each new home prior to occupancy. The sanitary sewer service for the home that had previously existed on this property must be removed to the City's sewer main. j. Any recommendation or approval of this PUD must be contingent upon the successful completion of the Wetland Conservation Act process, including the field review. Until a formal notice of decision has been made by the City, no permits will be issued for site work on the three parcels. k. Separate City Stormwater Management permits and Tree Preservation permits are required for the initial phase of construction and for construction of each home. I. The Developer must submit final construction plans for the storm sewer and filtration basin which meet City and Bassett Creek Watershed Management requirements. m. The Developer must provide a construction phasing plan as part of the final construction plan submittal, for the review and approval of the Physical Development Department. This plan must show and describe the temporary access, parking, staging, and any other proposed activities relating to the construction of this PUD. n. The Developer must enter into a maintenance agreement with the City, before the issuance of building permits, setting forth the responsibilities of the Developer or future homeowners association for the following: i. Maintenance of the private shared driveway, including pavement preservation and replacement, routine street sweeping, and snow removal. ii. Maintenance of the storm sewer and storm water quality treatment facilities. o. The Developer shall provide the City satisfactory evidence that it is the fee owner of the Subject Property. p. Any agreements or other documentation required hereunder to be submitted by the Developer to the City or approved by the City (including without limitation any easements) shall be acceptable to the City in form and substance. q. The Developer shall obtain any other required permits from the City and other governmental authorities as required for the construction of the development. 4. Development Plans. The Subject Property shall be developed in accordance with the approved plans, original copies of which are on file with the City's Physical Development Department. 5. Installation by Developer. The Developer shall install or cause to be installed and pay for the following, hereinafter referred to as the "Site Improvements." The securities required for Site Improvements are discussed later in this Agreement. a. Setting of Lot and Block Monuments. b. Surveying and staking of work required to be performed by the Developer. c. Installation of gas, electric, communications, and cable lines prior to building occupancy. Developer must place these facilities underground and utilize joint trench construction for all private utilities and communications facilities serving the development. d. Installation of all sanitary sewer services and water services to the buildings as shown on the Final Plans or as amended in final construction plans approved by the City. e. Installation of all storm sewer and storm water quality treatment facilities as shown on the Final Plans, and as may be amended upon review of the Bassett Creek Watershed Management Commission or in final construction plans approved by the City. f. Construction of the private shared driveway. g. Installation of driveway apron that meets City standards. h. Establish native vegetation buffers in the conservation easements over the wetlands and shoreline areas adjacent to Sweeney Lake. i. The grading, erosion control and landscaping, all of which shall all be made in accordance with City approved plans. 6. Public Improvements Constructed by Developer.The Developer shall install or cause to be installed and pay for the following, hereinafter referred to as "Public Improvements Constructed by Developer." The security required for Public Improvements Constructed by Developer is discussed later in this Agreement. a. The Developer must construct the sanitary sewer main and manholes which extend from Noble Drive to the proposed cul-de-sac and generally follows the atignment of the private driveway. Upon construction and acceptance by the City, the City will own and maintain the sanitary sewer main and manholes. b. The Developer must construct the watermain which extends from Noble Drive to the proposed cul-de-sac and generally follows the alignment of the private driveway. Upon construction and acceptance by the City,the City will own and maintain the watermain, valves, hydrants, and the portion of the water services from the main to the curb stop valves, including the curb stop valves. c. Preparation and submittal of construction record drawings for all public improvements, to be reviewed and approved by the Physical Development Department. d. Other items as necessary to complete the development as described herein and the Final Plans, including without limitation, the City's written engineering comments on the Final PUD dated February 5, 2015, which comments have been delivered to the Developer. 7. Property Fees and Char�es. The Developer shall pay all applicable fees, charges, and assessments for PUD 120 and the Subject Property in effect at the time of issuance of building permits. The fees shall include the following fees: a. Park Dedication Fee The Developer is assessed a Park Dedication Fee of$13,920 per City Code. Payment in full is required prior to the City's signing and release of the Final Plat and the issuance of any building permits. b. Conservation Easement Fee The Developer is assessed a fee of$1,500 (calculated at $500 x 3 parcels = $1,500) for attorney's fees and legal processing fees associated with the drafting and recording of conservation easements granted to the City by each property owner. Payment in full is required prior to the City's signing and release of the Final Plat and the issuance of any building or site permits. 8. Assessments. The Developer understands that the Developer or the Builders will be required to pay for the Subject Property fees, charges and assessments in effect at the time of issuance of building permits. The rates for each of these items will be set according to the current rate structure at the time the building permit is received. 9. Securities for Site Improvements. a. Developer shall be responsible for establishing a buffer of native vegetation within the conservation easement areas along the wetland and shoreline areas adjacent to Sweeney Lake. Establishment includes creation and management of the buffer during the first growing season and monitoring and management of the buffer for two additional growing seasons thereafter. Developer must also install survey monuments meeting the City standards marking the boundaries of the conservation easements. A cash security in the amount of 125% of the estimated cost for improvements (calculated at $8,500 x 125% _ $10,625.00j shall be submitted as a guarantee that the work will be completed in a timely manner and according to plans approved by the City. Upon completion of the installation of the vegetative buffer and survey markers, and approval of the inspection by City staff, the City shall release 50% of the deposit to Owner. Upon the second anniversary of completion and survival of the vegetative buffer, the City shall release the remaining Deposit after completion of an inspection by City staff. Owner must request in writing that the City perform the inspections and release the deposit or portions thereof. 10. Securities for Public Improvements Constructed bv Developer. a. 150% of the estimated construction costs (calculated at$76,000 x 150% _ $114,000) for the public improvements constructed by Developer, including sanitary sewer and water systems, as described in this Agreement and the Engineering review of the Final PUD. The letter of credit or cash deposit may be reduced no more than four times annually until completion of the public improvements. Five percent (5%) of the security required herein will be retained by the City until a one-year warranty period following final acceptance of the public improvements has been completed. Within thirty days after the notice by Developer of conclusion of the warranty period, City agrees to perform a warranty inspection of the subject construction. Within ten additional days City will provide Developer with either a list of corrections or final release documentation (provided by Developer) suitable for releasing the deposit. If corrections are required and upon notice by Developer that the corrections have been made,the ten day inspection and ten day notification or release will be followed. The breakdown of the estimated costs submitted by the Developer are as follows: Sewer $35,000 Water $41,000 Subtotal $76,000 x 150% Total $114,000 b. Developer shall submit a Cash Deposit (escrow) for construction observation services in the amount of$9,120.00 (calculated at 12% of the estimated cost to construct the public improvements). The City shall treat the deposit as a separate account on its books. All interest earned on the deposit shall accrue to the City. When any amount becomes due and payable for construction observation services, the City shall deduct the amount from the deposit upon the City's receipt of invoices for the same. After the payment of all such amounts,the City shall refund to the Developer the balance of the deposit, if any, without interest. In the event the Developer provides a letter-of-credit pursuant to any of the foregoing provisions, it shall concurrently therewith deliver to the City an executed letter-of-credit deposit agreement in form and substance acceptable to the City. 11. Developer's Default. Upon an Event of Default (defined below), the City shall be entitled to all the remedies permitted by law or equity. Without limiting the foregoing, with respect to an Event of Default by the Developer as to any of the work to be performed by it hereunder, the City may, at its option, perform the work and the Developer shall promptly reimburse the City for any expense incurred by the City, provided the .Developer is first given notice of the work in default, not less than 48 hours in advance. The Developer grants the City full authority and a license to act as set forth in the previous sentence following an Event of Default, and it shall not be necessary for the City to seek a court order for permission to enter the land. When the City does any such work, the City may, in addition to its other remedies, levy the cost in whole or in part as a special assessment against the Subject Property. The Developer waives its right to notice of hearing and hearing on such assessments and waives the right to appeal such assessments pursuant to Minnesota Statutes, Section 429.081. The following shall be an "Event of Default" under this Agreement: (i) the failure by the Developer to pay when due and invoiced the amounts required to be paid by Developer under any provision of this Agreement; or (ii) failure by the Developer to observe and perform any covenant, condition or obligation on its part to be observed or performed under this Agreement. 12. Responsibilitv for Costs. a. Except as otherwise specified herein, the Developer shall pay all documented costs incurred by it or the City in conjunction with the approval of the PUD and ensuring compliance with the Final Plans, including but not limited to reasonable legal, planning, engineering and inspection fees and expenses incurred in connection with approval and acceptance of the PUD, the preparation of this Agreement and other legal documents, and all reasonable costs, expenses, legal, engineering and planning fees incurred by the City in reviewing the application and related documents, and in monitoring and inspecting the progress of the Project. b. The Developer shall indemnify and hold the City and its officers, employees and agents harmless from claims made by Developer for damages sustained or costs directly incurred resulting from development of the Project, construction and operation, except for such damages or costs resulting from the gross negligence, intentional misconduct or intentional violation of this Agreement or applicable laws and ordinance by the City, or its officers or employees. c. The Developer shall reimburse the City for reasonable costs incurred in the enforcement of Developer's obligations under this Agreement, including engineering, building official, planning and attorney's fees, and for the City's performance of Developer's obligations under this Agreement in the event that the Developer faits to commence or corhplete such obligations on a timely basis. d. The Developer shall pay in full all documented bills submitted to it by the City for obligations properly incurred under this Agreement within sixty (60) days after receipt; if the bills are not paid on time, the City may halt all development work and construction on the Property until the bills are paid in full, and may draw on any of the security deposited hereunder to discharge such obligations. Bills not paid within sixty (60) days shall accrue interest at the rate of eight percent (8%) per year. • e. In addition to any other remedies permitted by law, in the event the Developer fails to pay any amount payable to the City hereunder when due, the City may charge such amount, in whole or in part, as a special assessment against the Subject Property. 13. Miscellaneous. a. The Developer represents to the City that the development of the Subject Property as contemplated herein complies with all City, county, metropolitan, state and federal laws and regulations including, but not limited to: subdivision ordinances, zoning ordinances and environmental regulations. b. Third parties shall have no recourse against the City under this Agreement. c. In addition to any other remedies available to the City, Breach of any term of this Agreement by the Developer shall be grounds for denial of building permits, including lots sold to third parties. d. If any portion, section, subsection, sentence, clause, paragraph or phase of this Agreement is for any reason held invalid, such decision shall not affect the validity of the remaining portion of this Agreement. e. The action or inaction of the City shall not constitute a waiver or amendment to the provisions of this Agreement. To be binding, amendments or waivers shall be in writing, signed by the parties and approved by written resolution of the City Council. The City's failure to promptly take legal action to enforce this Agreement shall not be a waiver or release. f. This Agreement, any amendments hereto, and conditions of the Ordinance are building on all successors and signs of the Developer, shall run with the land and shall be recorded against the title to the property. This Agreement must be recorded in the appropriate Hennepin County land records at the expense of the Developer and a copy of the recorded executed Agreement provided by the Developer to the City. g. The Developer, its successors and assigns, agree to provide the execution of amendments to this Agreement, as are necessary to effect the recording hereof. After the Developer has completed the work required of it under this Agreement, at the Developer's request, the City will execute and deliver a release to the Developer as for the obligations related to such work. h. Each right, power or remedy herein conferred upon the City is cumulative and in addition to every other right, power or remedy, express or implied, now or hereafter arising, available to the City, at law or in equity, or under any other agreement, and each and every right, power and remedy herein set forth or otherwise so existing may be exercised from time to time as often and in such order as may be deemed expedient by the City and shall not be a waiver of the right to exercise at any time thereafter any other right, power or remedy. i. The Developer may not assign this Agreement without the written permission of the City. j. The Developer represents to the City that, with respect to itself (and with respect to third parties,to its actual knowledge) not material representations have been or will be made, nor has any materially inaccurate information been or will be provided to the City by the Developer during the City's review process. k. Notwithstanding any provision of this Agreement to the contrary, to the full extent permitted by State laws, any further development or construction of new improvements and any additions or alterations to existing improvements not expressly approved under this Agreement will require additional approvals from the City, as required by City ordinances, and in full compliance with any amendments to the City's Comprehensive Plan or Zoning Ordinance requirements enacted after the date of this Agreement. 14. Notices. Required notices to the Developer shall be in writing, and shall be either hand delivered to the Developer, its employees or agents, or mailed to the Developer by registered mail at the following addresses: The Lecy Group 2640 North Saunders Lake Drive Minnetrista, MN 55364 Notices to the City shall be in writing and shall be either hand delivered to the City Manager, or mailed to the City by registered mail in care of the City Manager at the following address: City Manager City of Golden Valley 7800 Golden Valley Road Golden Valley, MN 55427 IN WITNESS WHEREOF,the parties have hereunto set their hands the day and year first above written. CITY OF GOLDEN VALLEY By: Shepard M. Harris, Mayor By: Thomas D. Burt, City Manager DEVELOPER By: Its STATE OF MINNESOTA ) ) ss. COUNTY OF HENNEPIN ) The foregoing instrument was acknowledged before me this day of , 2015, by Shepard M. Harris, Mayor, and Thomas D. Burt, City Manager, of the City of Golden Valley, a Minnesota municipal corporation, on behalf of the corporation and pursuant to the authority granted by its City Council. Notary Public STATE OF MINNESOTA ) ) ss. COUNTY OF ) The foregoing instrument was acknowledged before me this day of , 2015, by The Lecy Group, on behalf of the said Developer. Notary Public ATTACHMENT 1 Lots 1, 2 and 3, Block 1, and Outlot A, Sweeney Lake Woods P.U.D. No. 120, Hennepin County, Minnesota Resolution 15-63 July 21, 2015 Member introduced the following resolution and moved its adoption: RESOLUTION FOR APPROVAL OF PLAT - SWEENEY LAKE WOODS P.U.D. NO. 120 WHEREAS, the City Council for the City of Golden Valley, pursuant to due notice, has heretofore conducted a public hearing on the proposed plat to be known as Sweeney Lake Woods P.U.D. No. 120 covering the following described tracts of land: Tract E, except that part of said Tract embraced in plat of Heathbrooke; Tract A, Registered Land Survey No. 1104, Hennepin County, Minnesota. WHEREAS, all persons present were given the opportunity to be heard; NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, by the City Council for the City of Golden Valley, that said proposed plat be, and the same hereby is, accepted and approved, and the proper officers of the City are hereby authorized and instructed to sign the original of said plat and to do all other things necessary and proper in the premises. Shepard M. Harris, Mayor ATTEST: Kristine A. Luedke, City Clerk The motion for the adoption of the foregoing resolution was seconded by Member and upon a vote being taken thereon, the following voted in favor thereof: and the following voted against the same: whereupon said resolution was declared duly passed and adopted, signed by the Mayor and his signature attested by the City Clerk. ��_ � � m � ���1�-��"o z 0 z U O � � � � \ I � � I ��� � ,y � A ^ � �'� ��:y�. � �O � _� a.�N i - , I � � b�.( �� � i ' M`�<e � I `���y. . `ljl.� �$ f _ ¢ � �� //�� � � '�� b � �•. � i� �' � , `oy ;3=:� � � g �� I \ „��Sbl O. Y��Y o � �`� i eQ$9 •� � �,, b��'o- '°� YE�Z-Q � •C' � i' i O ` ^-i` �'y 5� �'��' ,�� r � �'�:� � >F '� + ' �� '-" _ ,/ S�b�MS /i000M ��//� � ��I� !"'�q. �� \\`�,r. S�i6J . J '�O L 2�0 T i (' � ti�+f ��''•y'L. �S ��- i -' (Y x'' �y ma „_'_--__, ,y� /� A^ a� ti—\ ��.c'� Y`3 , ZX� e.�� i SNd�'S� :'�„ :�� ,��•,�R<- s �i \,, Ja' �% . � W �.$ /� � _ - -'. . �l/,^n y^ "� I x .- \ \ .d+P` '' �9: �/ , `? 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L. Approve Contract for Professional Services - Lower Level Remodel Prepared By Marc Nevinski, Physical Development Director Summary The recent reorganization of various City functions into the Physical Development Department has prompted the need to remodel the lower level of City Hall. Currently, the lower level is divided by a large corridor into two distinct areas, Engineering and Inspections. Additionally, Planning is located upstairs in City Hall. Because these three functions are closely related and frequently work together, the current layout results in disjointed and multiple stops for customers and staff. The layout is inefficient, does not facilitate collaboration, and is not customer oriented. The Inspections area was last remodeled in the early 1990's and the Engineering area was remodeled most recently in the early 1980's. Staff and Environmental Process, Inc. (EPI) have developed a conceptual lower level plan to address the aforementioned deficiencies. Under this remodel plan, the lower level will be opened up to better utilize space, allow for more efficient and collaborative work flow, and centralize front line staff to assist customers. Additionally, this plan will enable the cross training of staff, more effective use of staff time and talents, and create one-stop for customers needing service from public works, engineering and planning. Council is asked to approve a professional services contract in the amount of$55,000 with EPI to provide design, bidding, and project management services for this remodeling project.The project itself is projected to be $600,000 with work beginning as early as December 2015 and concluding in April 2016. Attachments • Professional Services Contract with Environmental Process, Inc. (5 pages) • Conceptual remodel plan (1 page) Recommended Action Motion to approve the professional services contract with Environmental Process Inc. ��r�t��Mtjs ���Y �"'yr ENVIRONMENTAL PROCESS, INC. � = `� 715 Florida Ave.S.,Suite 111 18382 FM 302,Suite 103 ,�.w� Golden Valley,MN 55426 Fax: 763-398-0121 Canyon Lake,TX 78133 �•�•*�'t� 763-398-3040 Phone: 888-733-3050 830-935-4909 enim�ls(c�go-e i.n com www.go-epi.com enitx[c�go-epi.com July 2, 2015 Mr. Marc Nevinski Physical Development Director City of Golden Valley 7800 Golden Valley Road Golden Valley, MN 55427 Re: City of Golden Valley— 2015 Scope of Work G2 City Hali —2015 Lower Level Remodel: EPI File No. 2015-678 Proposal for Architectural, Engineering, and Environmental Services Dear Mr. Nevinski: 1.0 INTRODUCTION Thank you for this opportunity for Environmental Process, Inc. (EPI) to submit our proposa) to provide Architectural, Engineering, and Environmental services for the Lower Level Remodeling Project at the City of Golden Valley City Hall (ocated at 7800 Golden Valley Road, Golden Valley, Minnesota 55427. We are familiar with the City Hall building as we performed previous projects at City Hall. 2.0 SCOPE OF WORK 2.1 Citv Hall—2015 Lower Level Remodeling Proiect(G2) We understand the intent of this project is to provide Architectural, Engineering, and Environmental Services for the City Hall Lower Level Remodeling Project. This proposal is based on the updated Schematic Design #4 that we received on June 16, 2015, which updates the preliminary Schematic Design #3 in the Feasibility Report dated May 8, 2015. This proposal is based on utilizing the existing Lower Level HVAC system, generally altering and reconfiguring the existing system that serves the remodeled areas only in compliance with the 2015 Minnesota State Building Code Chapter 1311 Conservation Code for Existing Buildings Section 809.2. The remodeling scope of work includes the following. (1) remodeling of the existing inspections and engineering areas as in the Schematic Design #4; (2) new window at north elevation west of existing north elevation lower level windows; (3) new vestibule at existing north elevation exterior door west of the mechanical room exterior door; (4) removal of portions of the existing east-west corridor north structural load bearing wall; (5) removal of portions of the existing east- west corridor south structural load bearing wall; and (6) removal of portions of the existing east- west structural load bearing wall located south of corridor south wall. The design of a new exit system located at the southeast section of the Lower Level is not included in this proposal, it is our understanding the design and installation of this exit system will be performed as a separate project prior to this project. City of Golden Valley City Hall—2015 Lower Level Remodel July 2, 2015 Page 2 A. Phase 1 — Preliminary Schematic Design, Feasibility, and Construction Cost Estimate was completed on May 8, 2015. B. The scope of work for Phase 2A—Asbestos Survey is as follows: l. Existing building materials limited asbestos survey (collection and analysis of samples). The limited asbestos survey will include materials that likely may be disturbed or susceptible to damage as a part of this project. We anticipate collection and analysis per Minnesota Department of Health Rules and Regulations of approximately 60-68 samples. C. The scope of work for Phase 2B—Existing As-Built Plan Preparation is as follows: l. The existing plans available are not as-built building plans, but rather original construction plans. The architectural, structural, mechanical (HVAC/plumbing) and electrical plans need to be all field verified and updated for accuracy to perform accurate demolition plans and remodeling Construction Documents. D. The scope of work for Phase 2C - Construction Documents is as follows: 1. Submit Design Development Documents to the Owner. Attend one (1) meeting with the Owner to review the Design Development Documents. Includes one (1) modification to the design after Design Development meeting. Additional design work will be performed at time and material. 2. Preparation of registered Architectural/Engineering plans and specifications (contract documents) for the purpose of obtaining public (open) bids for the City Hall Lower Level Remodeling Project as described above. a. Architectural plans including but not limited to the following: (1) Lower Level Demolition Plan; (2) Lower Level Floor Plan; (3) Lower Level Reflected Ceiling Plan; (4) Room Finish Schedule; (5) Door Schedule; and (6) Details and Sections. b. Structural plans including but not limited to the following: (1) Footing and Foundation Plan; (2) Upper Level Floor Framing (Columns and Beams) Plan; and (3) Structural Details. c. Mechanical plans including but not limited to the following: (1) Lower Level Plumbing Plan and Isometrics; (2) Lower Level HVAC Demolition Plan; and (3) Lower Level HVAC Plan. d. Electrical plans including but not limited to the following: (1) Lower Level C,ighting Demolition Plan; (2) Lower Level Lighting Plan; (3) Lower Level Power and Signal Demolition Plan; and (4) Lower Level Power and Signal Plan. e. Fire sprinkler system modifications shall be a performance specification with the final design included as a part of the fire sprinkler contractor responsibility. f. Office furniture layout and specification by others. Coordinate with City of Golden Valley City Hall—2015 Lower Level Remodel July 2, 2015 Page 3 Owner& epi. g. Voice and data system by others. h. Security system modifications by others. 3. This proposal is based on the assumption that the existing building materials are asbestos free. If asbestos containing materials are found in Phase 2A asbestos survey, additional fees for asbestos abatement design (plans and specifications) will be required. E. The scope of work for Phase 3 - Construction Project Management / Quality Control is as follows: 1. Prepare bid advertisement, submit to Owner for publication. 2. Distribution of plans and specifications to Bidders shall be done by Owner. 3. Pre-bid conference meeting with minutes. 4. Review Contractor questions, clarify wark scope, Addendums, etc. during bidding. 5. Bid review and recommendation. 6. Review Contractor Contract, Insurance, Bonds for Owner / Contractor Agreement, (Prepared by Owner). 7. Pre-construction conference meeting with minutes. 8. Shop drawing and submittal review (shop drawings, schedule, payment schedule of values, samples, etc.). 9. This proposal is based on the assumption that the existing building materials are asbestos free. If asbestos containing materials are found in Phase 2A asbestos survey, additional fees for on-site monitoring and management of the asbestos abatement will be required. 10. Site observations during construction on a regular basis (as needed) during construction. An Architects' Field Report will be prepared for each site observation. Twelve (12) site observations and Architects' Field Reports are included (based on one (1) per week for twelve (12) weeks). Additional site observations and field reports during construction will be extra @ $300.00 per visit. 1 l. Contractor payment request, State IC-134, and lien waiver verification reviews. 12. Contractor/Owner change order requests and execution review/Owner prepares City of Golden Valley City Hall—2015 Lower Level Remodel July 2, 2015 Page 4 change order. 13. Final punch list site observation with documentation, preparation of substantial completion document, and one (1) follow up punch list site observation review. Additional site punch list observations and reports will be extra @ $300.00 per visit. 14. Collect and assemble contractor closeout documents, Lien Waivers, IC-134, and contractor as-built plan submittal to Owner. 3.0 CLIENT RESPONSIBILITIES This proposal is based on the following client responsibilities. 3.1 Provide existing building as-built building plans & specifications (Architectural, Structural, Mechanical, and Electrical). 3.2 Provide any required documents to be inserted in the contract document. 3.3 Provide review of EPI's contract documents before bidding. 3.4 Provide access to the building areas as needed. 4.0 ADDITIONAL SERVICES 4.1 Prepare and verify existing as-built building architectural, structural, mechanical, and electrical plans. 4.2 Expansion of the work scope of project. 4.3 Preparation of asbestos (hazardous materials) abatement design (plans and specifications) as described in Section 2.1, D. 3 if asbestos is identified. 4.4 Asbestos on-site monitoring and management if asbestos requires abatement as described in Section 2.1, E, 10. 5.0 FEE SCHEDULE Based on the services as defined above, EPI proposes a time and material not to exceed professional service fee for the Architectural / Engineering / Environmental and Project Management/Quality Control services. This fee breakdown is as follows: City Hall—Lower Level Remodel Phase 1 Schematic Design, Feasibility, and Cost Estimate Complete Phase 2A Asbestos Survey— Performed when area is vacant (after hours) $ 4,000.00 Phase 2B Review/PrepareNerify As-Built Plans (Architectural/Structural/ Mechanical/Electrical) for Contract Design Documents $ 3,500.00 Phase 2C Construction Documents (plans and specifications) $35,000.00 Phase 3 Construction Project Mana�ement/Qualitv Control Services $10,000.00 Total Professional Fees (NTE) $52,500.00 Estimated Reimbursable Expenses at actual costs - Estimated 2 500.00 Total Project Estimate $55,000.00 City of Golden Valley City Hall —2015 Lower Level Remodel July 2, 2015 Page 5 6.0 PRELIMINARY PROJECT SCHEDULE Asbestos Survey and Structural Evaluation/As-built plan verify/development July 15-31,2015 Preparation of Construction Documents(Plans and Specifications) August&Sept. 2015 Install Exit Required from Lower Level—Separate Contract August-Octotober 2015 Bidding(Pre-Bid Mtg., Bid Opening, Bid Review and Recommendation) October 2015 Bid Award/Contracts(Council Meeting, Contracts, Insurance, Bonds) November 2015 Shop Drawing Preparation,Review, and Approval December 1-15, 2015 Contractor Mobilization/Project Work/Asbestos Abatement(if needed) January-March 20]6 Punch List/Finalize All Work March 2016 Project Close Out Documents(IC-134, Lien Waivers, Final Payment) April 2016 Please feel free to call me at (763) 398-3040 with any questions or comments. We feel confident that we can assist you and look forward to working with you on this project. If you have any questions or find this proposal acceptable, please sign, date and return and we will schedule date to begin. Sincerely, ENVIRONMENTAL PROCESS, INC. , ��,-,�.....� �?',,�.�,,..� Denny Langer, PE Architecture/Engineering Manager Copy: Michael Berreau, EPI EPI File 2015-678 Attachment: Attachment#1 - Schematic Design #4 dated June 16, 2015 Please sign below indicating your acceptance of this proposal to follow our City yearly 2015 Professional Service Agreement. This needs to be submitted to insure EPPs insurance requirements. Again, thank you for the opportunity to provide this proposal. Signature of Acceptance Date ° ��� ' ' � � F's fi 3� 1 a�i�8 o a���g� � �N' o�,� ��'" � � a y'�N � b�'n��Y LE455 C'10$3MUW�A3lTdn N3410� ��` �. ������ �����a� ��� QVGY!.l3�TYn N34109 OmBL � �<�,;�,a ���'6�`- ��-�m �340W3J 13�31?�3f110� - ��'dN ,lll� �� �°� �� �$����� ���m�� �13���'J� N�C1�0�7 �O ,lll� � �� � w��aLLm S��Rcns so52�l��1 I at �� � J � � � � � � � � � v � - � - - � n > -- o � � � � ', � � � i�-� �i,�a�� � g � Q �m x � � � - � � � m �N � - � � a 3 Z J 3� 9 � � � � � � �U' 3 l�7�a � � w w z w� ��a \� �� W '� -1- - - - - - - �° �� '� � 4 ----- - - - -- - - --------------- i i � - �� ��� � �_ � � � � � ��-- �; � � � � �, �� � -�- � L�i-� �- - �� � � � �m =� , � ____ - ; a � �� �� ��---� � - =m � s , � �o � . �. 3 ,, _. I-� .-��! , � � �----- � '� � _ � �-�.,� a�—� --� �Q �� � � __ $ �% ��m � $ +___� � �m �m r � �m �m ' � � ��� z = W �� s Q 'i o �m �m i u e.a�o�s � n_ a M, a � � � _ ��' �� i �� �g '� N � �� � �� � ��� ' o � � � � � W 1- n ' � �y �� J � � � -T' & W � �� I . "`d ' �0 N ',' �� w J:- !C� - � „ -E- J � Q� +� �LLi __ �9 �S �. H Q �j � U� - l�_ � a �, � � � - � _ � c�t�y t�f r���$ ,,,,,, �' Ph sical T�►evela rnent De artment �� Y �' r 763-593-8030/763-593-33$8(fax) .._. , .._��.����a��,a���'we,�R�:��.. � .��.���im�����;� N��a��..�: .�; , �;-..�,�da������:,'������. ,�a�� r����i��� ..,. Executive Summary For Action Golden Valley City Council Meeting July 21, 2015 Agenda Item 3. M. Liberty Crossing Redevelopment Project Update Prepared By Marc Nevinski, Physical Development Director Summary Staff has been working on the Liberty Crossing redevelopment project and wishes to apprise the Council of its status and upcoming steps. Liberty Crossing and is located at the southeast quadrant of Winnetka Avenue North and Medicine Lake Road. Intuitive Investment proposes to redevelop industrial and commercial properties into multi-family housing in the form of an apartment building and townhomes. A redevelopment plan and a tax increment financing district (Redevelopment) are proposed for the area. Tax increment will help to fund infrastructure improvements in the area to reduce flooding on Medicine Lake Road and in the DeCola Ponds sub-watershed district. LHB, Inc. has inspected the properties proposed for inclusion in the district, documented their condition, and found them to meet the "structurally substandard" and coverage ratio tests required for the establishment of a redevelopment TIF district, which can run for up to 25 years. HRA staff and the developer are currently discussing the design and configuration of the infrastructure, and the final plan and agreement will determine how the increment is allocated. Assuming no objection by the Council, staff will begin the process of establishing a TIF district. Public hearings on the TIF plan are expected to be scheduled in September for both the HRA and City Council. Special HRA meetings will most likely be required and will be noticed as appropriate and necessary. Recommended Action Motion to receive and file the Liberty Crossing redevelopment update. t'I��� C�� � �.�y r � ��4 � � � � �`-� � :��� � °�� �, a, �� . .� �� , � � ,.,� � �; ��� � �� � ��. �..'� Physical Development Department 763-593-8030/763-593-3988(fax) � � � � ��-2.� � _ _ ���� ��_.. � � ��� _ _ �.. � Executive Summary For Action Golden Valley City Council Meeting July 21, 2015 Agenda Item 3. N. Cornerstone Creek Redevelopment Project Update Prepared By Marc Nevinski, Physical Development Director Summary Staff has been working on the Cornerstone Creek Redevelopment project and wishes to apprise the HRA of their status and upcoming steps. Cornerstone Creek is located along Golden Valley Road in the existing Highway 55 West Redevelopment Area. CDHC Cornerstone Creek LLC is proposing to construct a 45 unit affordable, permanent, and supportive housing project to serve developmentally disabled adults. The project will be located in the Highway 55 West Redevelopment Area on parcels currently addressed as 9300 and 9310 Golden Valley Road. Assistance with the project in the form of a tax increment financing district (housingj has been requested to help develop the project and maintain rents at an affordable rate for the tenants. Such districts typically run for 25 years and help provide housing for people making no more than 60% area median income. The Council approved Resolution 14-46 on May 20, 2014, expressing its intent to create and administer a tax increment financing district for the project. Assuming no objection by the Council, staff will begin the process of establishing a TIF district. Public hearings on the TIF plan are expected to be scheduled in September for both the HRA and City Council. Special HRA meetings will most likely be required and will be noticed as appropriate and necessary. Recommended Action Motion to receive and file the Cornerstone Creek Redevelopment update. L1��1 ()� � .: �� . . , � � � Cit Administration Council ��. �� -y - - - / 763 593 3989/763 593 8189(fax) Executive Summary For Action Golden Valley City Council Meeting July 21, 2015 Agenda Item 3. 0. Withdrawal from Northwest Hennepin Human Services Council (NWHHSC) Prepared By Chantell Knauss, Assistant City Manager Summary At the May 12, 2015 Council/Manager meeting, the City Council received an update on Northwest Hennepin Human Services Council's (NWHHSC) financials. The City Council directed staff to discuss with the City Attorney any options the City may have to be refunded Golden Valley's portion of unspent reserves; meet with the City's Advisory Committee members to inform them of the direction the City planned on going; and bring forth a resolution to withdraw from NWHHSC in accordance with the bylaws. The City Attorney has reviewed the Bylaws and determined that when any member withdraws, the member forfeits their prorated share of unspent reserves, unless the NWHHSC Board votes to expend the reserves to refund the withdrawing member some or all their prorated share of the reserves. This type of option has been voted on by the NWHHSC Board several times and has not received enough votes to pass. Staff inet with Advisory Committee member Kim Rottmann. Advisory Committee member Melanie Christianson was not able to attend the meeting and was provided an update from Ms. Rottmann. At their July 14, 2015 City Council meeting, the City of Crystal passed a resolution withdrawing from membership in NWHHSC effective immediately. At their June 15, 2015 City Council meeting, the City of Maple Grove passed a resolution withdrawing from membership in NWHHSC effective for the 2016 budget year. Other cities that have withdrawn membership are: Plymouth, Champlin, Robbinsdale, Rogers, Dayton and Hassan Township. Attachments • Executive Summary Golden Valley Council/Manager Meeting May 12, 2015 (16 pages) • Resolution Withdrawing from Northwest Hennepin Human Services Council (1 page) Recommended Action Motion to adopt Resolution Withdrawing from Northwest Hennepin Human Services Council. L:d�`� t?� ,� , �.. C�'� �� �� � ��. ���� �, �� .� ��b. -� :� � �� �� �� �� �j �.,1 Cit Administration Council �� � y � 763-593-8003/763-593-8109(fax) Executive Summary Golden Valley Council/Manager Meeting May 12, 2015 Agenda Item 4. Northwest Hennepin Human Services Council Financial Update Prepared By Chantell Knauss, Assistant City Manager Summary The Northwest Hennepin Human Services Council (NWHHSC) is a joint powers agreement (JPA) made up of nine northwest municipalities within Hennepin County: Brooklyn Center, Brooklyn Park, Corcoran, Crystal, Golden Valley, Hanover, Maple Grove, New Hope, and Osseo. The NWHHSC is governed by an Executive Board comprised of one representative appointed by each member city. The NWHHSC is responsible for the overall research, planning and coordination of human services for the northwest Hennepin area: • Research - demographic make-up of communities, community needs • Planning- how to meet the identified and changing needs • Coordination - a convener of people and organizations to create partnerships that address human service issues. The NWHHSC has been notified that Hennepin County will not renew their contracts with the NWHHSC as of June 30, 2015. Instead, Hennepin County will be using the funds to directly provide and further enhance the services through Hennepin County. In 2014, 81% of the NWHHSC's funding was from contracts with Hennepin County, 16% from member city contributions and 3%from other sources. The reduction in contracts with Hennepin County after June 30, 2015 equal $394,670. Member city contributions for 2014 equal $100,393. For 2015, Golden Valley's member contribution is $8,556. The NWHHSC's 2014 Budget was $830,363. In order to balance the 2015 budget, the NWHHSC has had to substantially reduce its budget from $830,363 in 2014 down to $491,693, a reduction of 68.88%. In addition, the NWHHSC will use $136,000 of its $425,170 (31.99%) in reserves. In recent months, the Executive Board has been in discussions as to the future viability of the NWHHSC due to its lack of financia) resources. According to the JPA, each member city has a proportionate vote based on the member city's population when it comes to voting on organizational matters and distribution of assets, should the organization dissolve. Given this, Golden Valley has 21 votes which represent 9.09%. The majority votes of inember cities (Brooklyn Center, Brooklyn Park, New Hope) representing 51.95% of the vote want to form a new organization without first dissolving the current JPA and use the $425,170 in reserve funds for the new organization. Forming a new organization without dissolving the current JPA is outside the scope of the current JPA. Member cities that voted to disso►ve NWHHSC and distribute the remaining assets in accordance with Article IX, Section 1 of the JPA (proportionately) are: Maple Grove, Crystal, Corcoran, Osseo and Golden Valley, representing 48.05% of the vote. Given the NWHHSC financial situation and that majority votes will not result in a dissolution of the current JPA, Golden Valley has these options moving forward: • Continue its active membership in NWHHSC, resulting in a contribution of$8,556 or more annually. Contributions to member cities may be increased due to the guaranteed future funding shortfalls and the organization will likely dissolve in 2016 with the lack of funding and use of all remaining reserves to fund 2016 operations. • Discontinue membership in NWHHSC, effective January 1, 2016, resulting in a savings of $8,556 or more annually and forfeiting Golden Valley's future distribution of reserves ($26,286 as of January 1, 2016), should the majority of the Executive Board vote to dissolve after January 1, 2016. • Assist the majority member cities to create a new organization using the current JPA reserve funds. It is requested that Council provide direction as to the status of the City's future involvement in the NWHHSC. Attachments • Amended Joint and Cooperative Agreement (8 pages) • Program Activities that include Golden Valley (2 pages) • NWHHSC 2015 Annual Operating Budget (1 page) • Redpath and Company 2014 Independent Auditor's Report Summary and Note 11 (3 pages) AMENDED JOINT AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NORTHWEST HENNEPIN HUMAN SERVICES COUNCIL The Parties to this Agreement are govemmental units of the State of Minnesota This agreement is made pursuaat to Minnesota Statutes Section 471.59. ARTICLE I. GENERAL PURPOSE Section 1. 'The general purpose of tlus Agreement is to define the scope of operations and governance of an organization through which the Parties may joindy and cooperatively coordinate the pr.oviding of human services, both publicly and privately, in the tezritory of the Parties, thereby accomplisbing charitable ends as such term is defined in Se�tion 501(c)(3)of the Intemal Revenue Code of 1986. Section 2. This Arnended Agreement supersedes the Joint and Cooperative Agreement made by the Parties as of December 1975, which created the Northwest Hennepin Human Scrvices Council. � ARTICT,E II. DEFINITION OF TERMS For the put�wse of the Agreement,the terms defined in this Article shail have the meanings givcn the�m as follows: ._ Section 1. "Northwest Hennepin Hurnan Services Council" shall be the organization described and governed pursuant to tlris Agrcement. Section 2. "Board"shali mean the Board of Directors of t�e Northwest Hennepin Human Servic�s Council. Section 3. "Govemmental Unit"shall mean a city or township. Section 4. "Party"shall mean a govemmentaE unit which enters into this agresment � Section 5. "Human Services"shall include but not be limited to services and facilities to deal with and serve human needs relating to mental health,drug and alcohol abuse, famiiy counselittg, sh�lter,nvrsing and home health assistance,health education,primary health care,daycaze,aad other related matters. � Section 6. "Active Membe�''shali mean a Party that is obligated to provide funding for the Northwest Hennepin Human Services Council during a specified budget year. ARITCLE III. PA�t'I'�S Section I. The Governmental units,hereinaf�er refened to as"municipalities," eligible to become Parties to this Agreement are: Brooictyn Cen.ter Dayton New Hope Brookiyn Park Golden Valley p� Champlin Hanover Plymouth(north of 55) Corcoran Hassan Township Robbinsdale CrYstal Maple Grove Rogers Section 2. Any governmental urut desiring to enter into this Agreement may do so by the duty authorized execution of a copy of this Agreement by its proper officers. Thereupon,the clerk or other conesponding officer of the governmental unit shall file a duly executed copy of the Agresment,together with a certified capy of the authorizing resolution or other action,with the Executive Director of the Northwest Hennepin Human Services Council. The resolution authorizing the execution of the Agreement shall also designate the first director and attemate director for the member. ARTICLE N. BOARD OF DIRECTORS Section 1. The goveming and policymaking responsibilities of the Northwest Hennepin Human Services Council shall be vcsted in its Board of Directors,which shall controt its properry,be responsible for its finances,and direct its affairs. Each Active Member shall be entitled to one director who shall have one vote for each 1,000 or fraction thereof of the municipaiity's cucrent populanon as eterrrun by e Metrapoiitan Counci! or by special � census._ Section 2. Each Active Member shall also be entitled to one alternate director who shall be entitled to attend meetings of the Board and who may vote in the absence of the Member's director. Section 3. Directors and alternate directors shal!be appointed by the governing body of each Party. Active members should appoint as direotors and alternates persons who are interested in human services,and who can act in behalf af the cities they represent. Directors aad altemates shall serve without compensation from thc Northwest Hennepin Human S'ervices Council,but this shall not prevent an Active Member from providing compensation for its director or alternate director if such compensation is authorized by such municipality in accord with state and local taw. Section 4. There shall be no voting by proxy, but ail votes must be cast in person at ' Board meetings by the director or altemate. . Section 5. Directors and alternate directors shall be appointed to serve until their successors are appointed and qualified. 2 Section 6. When the goveming body of an Active Member appoints a director or alternate director it shal! give notice of such appoinhnent to the Northwest Hennepin Human Services Council in writing. . Section 7. Any director ar alternate director shall serve at the pleasure of the goveming body of the appointing Active Member. Section 8. A majority of the number of votes aitributable to then-Active Members shall constitute a quonun for meetings of the Board. ARTICLE V. POWERS AND DUTIES OF THE BOARD Section i. Ttie powers and duties of the Board shaIl include the powers set forth in � this Article and as otherwise provided by statute. Section 2. It may employ a person to act as Executive Director of the Board and may employ such other persons as it deems necessary to accomptish its powers and responsibilities. Anq such persons may be employed on a full-time,part-time,or consutting basis, as the Board may determine. Section 3. It may make such contracts as the Boazd d�ms necessary and advisable to make effectivc any power to be exercised by the Board pursuant to the provisions of this Agreement. �ection 4. �t may provide for any of its employees to be members of the Public Employees Retirement Association and may make any required employer contrihutioas to that organization and any other employer contributions whi�ch municipalities are authorized or required by law to make. Section 5. It shall establish an annuai budget for the Northwest Henaepin Human . Services Council. Section 6. It may invest or reinvest fitnds not needed for current operating expenses, if any, in the manner applicable by law to cities. It shall not at any time incur obligations in excess of funds then available to i� Section 7. It shall make a financial accounting and report to the Parties at least once each yeaz and its books and records shall be audited annually and be available for and open to examination by the Parties at all reasonable times. 3 Sec6on 8. It may accept gifts, apply for and use grants or Ioans of maney or other pmperty from the State,Hen�nepin County,or any other governmental units or organizations and may enter into agreements required in connection thierewith and may.hoid,use, and dispose of such monies or property in accordance with the terms of the gift, grant, Ioan or agreement relating thereto. Section 9. It may contract for space,materials,services,and supplies with a member Party ar elsewhere. Section i0. It may appoint one of its members to serve as liaison to the Advisory Commission. Secrion 11. It shall have the power to enter contracts with other agencies, companaes, or individuals to provide services according to the recommendations found in its human services pIan as comprehended herein. Section 12. It may provide,within its resources, for the indemnification of directors, officers, and employees against reasonable costs and expenses incurred by any of such persons in connection with auy action,suit, or proceeding in which he may be involved by reason of his having been a director, officer, or employee,except amounts paid or payable to the Board itself, and except in relation to matters as to which he shall be finally adjudged in any action,suit,or proceeding to have been derelict in the performance of his duties as such director,offcer,or employee. Such indemnification need not be exclusive of other rights to which any such person would be entitled as a mattcr of law. � Section 13. It may conduct research and investigation regarding existing and possible fuhue human services facilitics and programs and may develop a proposed plan for the rendering of humau services. Section 14. It may prepare an inventory of human sezvices facilities, services,and agencies, both public and private,available to persons being or residing in the territory of the Parties. It may make an evaluation of any existing or proposed hwman service progz�ams,may call attentioa to human services needs and to redundant human services programs,and may undertake to stimulate, encourage, and coordinate human services programs, public and private, within the territory of the Parties. Section 1 S. It may exercise any other power necessary and incidental to the impiementation of its powers and duties undei the provisions of this Agreement. 4 ARTICLE VI. MEETINGS—ELECTiON AND DUTiES OF OFFiCERS Section 1. At the annuai meeting of the Board each even-numbered year thereafter, the Boazd shall elect from its members a chairman,a vice-chairman,and a secretary-treasurer. New officers shall take offce at the adjournment of the annua!meeting of the Board at which they are elected. Section 2. A vacaacy shaIl immediately occur in the office o€any officer upon his resignation, death,or otherwise upon his ceasing to be a representative of his governmental unit. Upon vacancy occurring in any office,the Executive Committee shall fill such position untii the next meeting of the Board. Section 3. The three officers shall all be members of the Executive Committee. Section 4. The chairman shall preside at all meetings of the Board and the Executive Committee. The vice-chairman shall act as chairman in the absence of the chairman. Section S. The secretary-treasurer shall be responsible for keeping a record of all the proceedings of the Board and the Executive Committee, for custody of all funds, for the keeping of ai1 financial records of the organization and for such other matters as shall be delegated to him by the board. At�y persons may be engaged to perform such services under his supervision and direction when authorized by the Board. He shall post a fidelity bond or other insurance against loss of organization funds in an amount approved by the$oazd at the expense of the organization Section 6. At all times the Board shall have bylaws governing its proceduces, including the time,place, frequency and notice of its regular meetings and the manner of calling special meetings. Such bylaws shall provide for no less than two Board meeti.ngs each year, including an annual meeting of the Board in Januazy. The byiaws may be amended from time to titne by a majority of the votes attributable to all then-Active Members. ARTICLE VII. FINANCIAL MATTERS Section l. The fiscal year of the Northwest Hennepin Human Services Councii shail be the calendar year. Section 2. An annual budget shall be adopted by tt�e$oazd at a meeting no later than July. Copies shail be mailed,promptly thereafter,to the chief administrarive offcer of each member Party. An Aetive Member may elect to become inactive by giving written notice to the Executive Director by September 30 of the year preceding the budget year for which t�e municipality will be on inactive status, Any Active Member that does not give timeIy written notice shall remain an Active Member and accordingly be obligated to provide financial support in the amount specified by the annual budget. 5 Section 3. Organization funds shall be expended by the Board consistent witii the requirements of applicabie iaw and the Bylaws. The Board of Directors shall adopt appropriate financial policies that enable it to exercise appropriate fiduciary oversight of the organiza.tion's affairs. Se�tion 4. Contracts shail be let and purchases made in couformance with the legal requirements applicable to contracts and purchases of statutory cities. ARTICLE VIII. WITHDRAWAL Section 1. Any Active Member Party may withdraw from the Northwest Hennepin Human Services Counci] by giving written notice of withdrawa�. A Party withdrawin,g from membership at a time when such withdrawal does not result in dissoiution of the organization shall forfeit its claim to any assets of the orgauiaation. Withdrawal from rhe organization does not relieve the withdrawing member of its financial obligation for the budget year ia which the notice is given or, uniess the notice complies with Article VII,Section 2, for the following budget year. ARTICLE IX. DISSOLUTTON � Section 1. The organization shall be dissolved by a two-thirds vote of the Board. Section 2. Upon diss�lution ihe remaining�assets of the vrganization, after payrnent of all obligations, shall be distributed among the the existing Active Members in pro ortion to ;K their contributions as determined y the Boaz . ere ve een no such contributions,the assets o . e orgaaization shall be returned to Hennepin County, ARTICLE X. DURA,TION Section 1. This Agreement shall continue in effect indefinitely,until terminated in accordauce with its terms. ARTICLE XI. EFFECTIVE DATE Section i. This agreement shail become effective upon its exccution by governmental units eligible to become Parties to this Agreement pwrsuant to Article III, Section I whose residents in totai number equal or exceed 67%of the�cutrent total population of all eligibte governmentai units. 6 ARTICLE XIi. ADVISORY COMMISSION Section 1. The scope of activity of the Northwest Hennepin Human Services Council Advisory Commission shall consist of advising the Northwest Hent�epin Human Services Council regarding human services matters aud performing various duties and assuming responsibilities delegated by the Board of Directors. Section 2. In fu[filiment of its puipose and as authorized by the Board of Directors, . the general duties and responsibilities of the Commission shall be to: (1) recommend service goals, poiicies,program priorities, objectives and standards for the service area. (2) promote azea agency coordination,communication and role clarification. (3} review program alternatives and recommend to the Board of Directors. (4) monitor and guide task forces appointed to provide in-depth study of specific programs or sociat problems. (5) advise the Board of Directors on the annual work plan and budget requirements. (6) publicize availability of services. Section 3. 1"he Commission shall consist of two members appointed by the governing � body of each Party having a current populatian of at least 7500 and one member&om each of those Parties having less than 7500 poputation. Section 4. The Commission shatl elect from its members a chairman, a vice- chairman, and a recording secretary at the January meeting of the Commission each odd- numbered yeaz. The chairman shall preside over meetings of t,he Commission, represent the Commission before the Council and provide Iiaison with other governmental and volunteer organizations engaged in human services activities. The chairmen may be removed from office by the Board. The vice-chairman shall perform such duties as may be assigned by the chairman and shali assume the chair in the absence of the cha.irman. The recording secretary shall record the minutes and maintain other records of the Commission. Section 5. Commissioners shall be appointed for terms of two years excegt that any person appointed to fill a vacancy occuiting prior to the expiration of the term for which his predecessor was appointed shall be appointed otily for the remainder of such term. Upon exp�iration of his tern�of office a member shall continue to serve unti[ his successor is appointed and shall have qualified. Commissioners shall serve without compensation. 7 � Section 6. Commissioners may resign voluntarily and other than the chairman may . be removed from o�ce by a majority vote of the governiag body of the appointing Party. Vacancies shall be fiIled in the manner that original appointments were made. Section 7. In appointing persons to the Commission, the Parties should give consideration to a broad spectrvm of individuals exhibiting an interest in human services, including health of&cers, l�ealth professionals, seaior citizens, young adults, law enforcement members,members of the clergy,representatives of business and labor,etc. Section 8. Subject to appzoval by the Northwest Hetu►epin Human Services CounciI . the commission shall adopt such rules and procedures not inconsistent with these provisions as may be necessary for the proper execution and conduct of its business. ARTICLE XIII. AMENDMENT This Agreement may be amended by mutual agreement of all member Parties that are Active Members for the year in which the amendment is made. Notice of a11 proposed amendments musi be provided to all Active Members prior to the adoption of the amendment, and adopted amendments must l�mailed to all member Parties. Anq governmental unit eligible to become Party to this Agreement that elects to become an Active Member after the adoption of an amendment is deemed to consent to the amendment. In WITNESS WHEREOF, the undersigned Parties have caused this Agreement to be executed on their behalf. DATE CITY OF BY Its Mayor BY Its City Manager or City Administratar 8 Program Activities that include your city • Emergenc Service Providers met at STEP in St Louis Park. We ta d about spending out our FHPA�rant before June 30`". Agencies gave updates on thei Programs. • Senior Leaders ' Committee met here at NWHHSC. We �Iked about all the details and tasks for the Senior orum which is coming up fast! Me ers gave city updates. We still need 2 residents for the ommittee. • Advisory Commission le ed about new transp ation option for seniors from Debra Burton, Executive Director o TN Twin Citie and gave updates. • Northwest Hennepin Early Ch hood twork had update on proposed early childhood funding and initiatives in the Legisla r from Kat Kempe, Think Small. Distributed Working Toward Success for Children and P en April newsletter. Members serving Crystal participated. • Suburban Hennepin Emerg cy Services Ex tive Directors Alliance discussed new opportunities for collaborat' n, followed up on the urbanization of Poverty information from the Brookings Inst' tion, and shared agency updat and program ideas with one another. Member se ing Crystal attended. • Healthy Togethe orthwest Larry Hiscock from Nexus Comm ity Partners presented information o quity and community engagement initiatives in this ea; the history of inequality d redlining in the metropolitan area; and ways to be engag in creating new opportu ties for diverse businesses, housing and services regionally. Mem s gave upd s. Members serving Crystal attended. Cit Connections � Met with Council Member Jeff Kolb. / Re ' al Committees and M ings Attended • Part ship for Chan teering Committee • Crystal siness ssociation (CBA) • Hennepin C nty Coordinated Assessment Seminar • FHPAP Leaders ' Committee • F AP Advisory C mittee • The Family Partnership �/ Golden Vallev: ��� Program Activities that include your city • Emergency Service Providers met at STEP in St Louis Park. We talked about spending out our FHPAP Grant before June 30th. Agencies gave updates on their Programs. • Senior Leadership.Committee met here at NWHHSC. We talked about all the details and tasks for the Senior Forum which is coming up fast! Members gave city updates. Golden Valley resident attended. • Advisory Commission learned about new transportation option for seniors from Debra Burton, Executive Director of ITN Twin Cities and gave updates. Members from Golden Valley participated. • Northwest Hennepin Early Childhood Network had update on proposed early childhood funding and initiatives in the Legislature from Kat Kempe, Think Small. Distributed Working Toward Success for Children and Parents April newsletter. Members serving Golden Valley participated. • Suburban Hennepin Emergency Services Executive Directors Alliance discussed new opportunities for collaboration, followed up on the Suburbanization of Poverty information from the Brookings Institution, and shared agency updates and program ideas with one another. Members serving Golden Valley participated. • Healthy Together Northwest Larry Hiscock from Nexus Community Partners presented information on equity and community engagement initiatives in this area; the history of inequality and redlining in the metropolitan area; and ways to be engaged in creating new opportunities for diverse businesses, housing and services regionally. Members gave updates. Members serving Golden Valley participated. Regional Com`nittees and Meetings Attended • Partnership for Change Steering Committee • Hennepin County Coordinated Assessment Seminar • FHPAP Leadership Committee • FHPAP Advisory Committee • The Family Partnership YI nover• Pro m Activities that include your city • Emer �ncy Service Providers met at STEP in St Louis Park. We talked about spending out our FHP�' rant before June 30th. Agencies gave updates o �ir Programs. • Senior Leaders ' Committee met here at NWHHS . e talked about all the details and tasks for the Senior For which is coming up fa . Members gave city updates. We need a resident for the committee. • Advisory Commission learned abou transportation option for seniors from Debra Burton, Executive Director of ITN T m ' s and gave updates. We still need a member from Hanover. • Northwest Hennepin Earl hildhood Network ha update on proposed early childhood funding and initiatives i e Legislature from Kat Kemp , hink Small. Distributed Working Toward Su ess for Children and Parents April new tter. • Suburban Hen pin Emergency Services Executive Directors A ' e discussed new opportunitie or collaboration, followed up on the Suburbanization of Poverty information Northwest Hennepin Human Services Council Annual Operating Budget-2015 1 2 3 4 Total-2015 14 Bud t Inc. decr. Comments Revenue 1 Cities memberships 100,393 100,393 0 City Memberships same 2 County contracts 66,500 233,491 (16(i,991) Change in county grant , 3 County Dir.Srvc. 185,700 413,379 (227,679) Change in county grant 4 Progam reimb. 0 8,000 (8,000) Loan repayments 5 Misc.Prog.Revenue 2,500 2,500 0 SeniorForum 6 Interest revenue 600 600 0 Ok 7 Total Revenue 355,693 758,363 (402,670) Change in county grant 8 nses 9 Salaries 149,383 216,605 (67.222) Wages 10 Frin�e 43,963 38,806 5,158 Benefits-slight increase/Staffeligible 11 Subtotal Labor Exp. 193,346 255,410 (�64) Total Labor 12 Contract Services 57,204 80,028 (22,R24) Reduced 13 Office supplies&Exp. 14,606 19,321 (4,715) 14 Occupancy Exp. 37,160 45,025 (7,865) Reduction in rent 15 Travel&Mtg Exp. 3,677 17,199 (13,522) 16 Direct Srv.Payments 185,700 413,379 (227,679) Change in grant amount 17 Total Expense 491,693 830,363 (338,670 18 Net Ina(Loss)b4 reserves (13C.00U) (72,000) (64,000) Net before use of reserves-TR net assets 19 Use of Reserve 136,000 72,000 64,000 Use of reserves 21 Net Surplus after use of above 0 0 (0) � Page � 3 , � F��t :, , � . . � � . .�� � ._, ��: • � k t� ,q � �:.� �.� � A N D �. C O M P A N V INDEPENDENT AUDITOR'S REPORT To the Boazd of Directors Northwest Hennepin Human Services Council Brooklyn Center, Minnesota We have audited the accompanying fmancial statements of Northwest Hennepin Human Services Council as of December 31, 2014, which collectively comprise Northwest Hennepin Human Services Council's basic financial statements as listed in the table of contents, and the related notes to the fmancial statements. Management's Responsibiliry for the Financial Statements Management is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of these financial statements in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America; this includes the design, implementation,and maintenance of intemal control relevant to the preparation and fair presentation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement,whether due to fraud or error. Auditor's Responsibility Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obta.in reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the fmancial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditor's judgment, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error.In making those risk assessments,the auditor considers internal control relevant to the entity's preparation and fair presentation of the fmancial statements in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity's internal control. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of significant accounting estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the fmancial sta.tements. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion. Opinion In our opinion,the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the respective financial position of Northwest Hennepin Human Services Council, as of December 31,2014, and the respective changes in financial position and cash flows thereof for the year then ended in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. 4810 White Bear Parkway, St. Paul, MN, 5511�1 651.426.7000 www.redpathcpas.com �Emphasis of Matter- Uncertainty As more fully described in Note 11 to the financial statements,the contract with Hennepin County will not be renewed beyond June 30, 2015. As a result,Northwest Hennepin Human Services Council is considering options,including the possibility of dissolution. Report on Summarized Comparative Information We have previously audited Northwest Hennepin Human Services Council's financial statements, and we expressed an unmodified audit opinion on those audited financial statements in our report dated February 28,2014. In our opinion,the summarized comparative information presented herein as of and for the year ended December 31, 2013, is consistent, in all material respects,with the audited financial statements from which it has been derived. Other Matters Required Supplementary Information Accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America require that the management's discussion and analysis and Funding Progress Other Postemployment Benefit Plan, as listed in the table of contents,be presented to supplement the basic financial statements. Such information,although not a part of the basic fmancial statements, is required by the Govemmental Accounting Standards Board,who considers it to be an essential part of financial reporting for placing the basic financial statements in an appropriate operational, economic, or historical context. We have applied certain limited procedures to the required supplemental information in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America,which consisted of inquiries of management about the methods of preparing the information and comparing the information for consistency with management's responses to our inquiries, the basic financial statements,and other knowledge we obtained during our audit of the basic financial statements. We do not express an opinion or provide any assurance on the information because the limited procedures do not provide us with sufficient evidence to express an opinion or provide any assurance. Other Information Our audit was conducted for the purpose of forming an opinion on the financial statements that collectively comprise Northwest Hennepin Human Services Council's basic financial statements. The supplemental information listed in the table of contents is presented for purposes of additional analysis and is not a required part of the basic fmancial statements. This information is the responsibility of management and was derived from and relates directly to the underlying accounting and other records used to prepare the basic financial statements. Such information has been subjected to the audiring procedures applied in the audit of the basic financial statements and certain additional procedures, including comparing and reconciling such information directly to the underlying accounting and other records used to prepare the basic financial statements or to the basic financial statements themselves, and other additional procedures in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America. In our opinion,the information is fairly stated in all material respects in relation to the basic financial statements as a whole. /�j����� �,.�1 ?�d. REDPATH AND COMPANY, LTD. St.Paul, Minnesota . February 26, 2015 a NORTHWEST HENNEPIN HUMAN SERVICES COUNCIL NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS December 31,20]4 Total lease expense for 2014,was$43,297. Future minimum annual rental payments are as follows: Office Copier Totals 20]5 $ 8,317 $ 5,071 $ 13,388 Note 9 NET POSITION Net position at December 31,2014,consists of the following: Unrestricted: Board designated reserves: Emergencies $50,000 Cash flow 250,000 Program cutbacks 24,000 Total board designated reserves 324,000 Undesignated 101,170 Total unrestricted 425,170 Total net position $425,170 Note 10 EMERGENCY SERVICES LOANS The Council receives grants for funding voluntary emergency service"loans"to individuals. Certain emergency services grants stipulate that these"loans"be repaid,if possible,to the Council. Due to the financial circumstances of most recipients,the repayment rate is approximately 5%. The grant contractor ended the loan repayments option as of June 23,2014. Therefore,the Council records these amounts on a cash basis-as expenses when"loans"are disbursed to individuals and as program reimbursement revenue when repayment is received by the Council. �Note 11 CONCENTRATIONS AND UNCERTAINTY The Council receives revenue from Hennepin County which amounted to$520,350 for 2014. This is 8]% of total revenue. The loss of this revenue could have a material effect on the Council. The cunent contract with Hennepin County runs through June 30,2015. Hennepin County has decided to not renew their contract with the Council for 2015 after June 30.As a result,the Council is considering options,including the possibility of dissolution. Resolution 15-64 July 21, 2015 Member introduced the following resolution and moved its adoption: RESOLUTION WITHDRAWING FROM NORTHWEST HENNEPIN HUMAN SERVICES COUNCI� WHEREAS, in 1975, the City of Golden Valley along with 13 other communities in northwest Hennepin County entered into a Joint and Cooperative Agreement to participate in the Northwest Hennepin Human Services Council (NWHHSC); and WHEREAS, there are currently eight active member cities; and WHEREAS, the primary funding source from Hennepin County is no longer available to NWHHSC and future, stable funding sources have not been identified; and WHEREAS, Article VIII of the Joint and Cooperative Agreement states any active member party may withdraw by giving written notice and said notice shall be provided no later than September 30 of the year preceding the budget year the member city will no longer be a member. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, by the City Council of the City of Golden Valley that the City is hereby withdrawing from the NWHHSC effective December 31, 2015 and written notice shall be sent in writing to NWHHSC prior to September 30, 2015. Shepard M. Harris, Mayor ATTEST: Kristine A. Luedke, City Clerk The motion for the adoption of the foregoing resolution was seconded by Member and upon a vote being taken thereon, the following voted in favor thereof: and the following voted against the same: whereupon said resolution was declared duly passed and adopted, signed by the Mayor and his signature attested by the City Clerk. �ity o�f -�§;.. ; �lden � Administrative Services De artment V�. �� p 763 593-8013/763-593-3969(fax) Executive Summary For Action Golden Valley City Council Meeting July 21, 2015 Agenda Item 3. P. Receipt of June 2015 Financial Reports Prepared By Sue Virnig, Finance Director Summary The monthly financial report provides a progress report of the following funds: � General Fund Operations � Conservation/Recycling Fund (Enterprise Fund) � Water and Sewer Utility Fund (Enterprise Fund) � Brookview Golf Course (Enterprise Fund) � Motor Vehicle Licensing (Enterprise Fund) � Storm Utility Fund (Enterprise Fund) � Equipment Replacement Fund (Capital Projects Fund) General Fund Operations: As of June 2015, the City is using$5,614,058 of fund balance to balance the General Fund Budget. Attachments • June 2015 Genera� Fund Financial Reports (2 pages) • June 2015 Conservation/Recycling Fund (1 page) • June 2015 Water and Sewer Utility Fund (1 page) • June 2015 Brookview Golf Course (1 page) • June 2015 Motor Vehicle Licensing (1 page) • June 2015 Storm Utility Fund (1 page) • June 2015 Equipment Replacement Fund (1 page) Recommended Action Motion to receive and file the June 2015 Financial Reports. City of Golden Valley Monthly Budget Report-General Fund Expenditures June, 2015 (unaudited) Over % 2015 June YTD (Under) Of Budget Division Budget Actual Actual Budget Expend. 001 Council $330,450 25,077 178,755 ($151,695) 54.09% 003 City Manager 774,940 55,222 336,907 (438,033) 43.48% ooa Transfers Out 475,000 475,000 475,000 0 100.00% (1) 005 Admin. Services 1,726,920 71,091 675,269 (1,051,651) 39.10% oos Legal 139,050 10,375 48,890 (90,160) 35.16% (2) oo� Risk Management 300,000 3,204 125,981 (174,019) 41.99% 0�1 General Gov't. Bldgs. 560,590 44,936 230,815 (329,775) 41.17% 016 Planning 303,780 21,488 129,742 (174,038) 42.71% o�s Inspections 704,575 44,665 303,979 (400,596) 43.14% 022 Police 5,568,860 396,596 2,371,365 (3,197,495) 42.58% 023 Fire 1,255,045 89,229 568,959 (686,086) 45.33% 035 Physical DevAdmin 285,180 13,606 122,697 (162,483) 43.02% 036 Engineering 759,890 32,874 273,499 (486,391) 35.99% 03� Streets 1,473,370 95,501 562,780 (910,590) 38.20% os5 Community Center 75,615 4,770 30,280 (45,335) 40.04% oss Park & Rec. Admin. 698,640 53,797 330,800 (367,840) 47.35% os� Park Maintenance 1,095,740 101,147 512,295 (583,445) 46.75% oss Recreation Programs 374,490 49,617 132,560 (241,930) 35.40% TOTAL Expenditures $16,902,135 $1,588,195 $7,410,573 ($9,491,562) 43.84% (1)This transfer was made in June, 2015. (2) Legal services are through May. City of Golden Valley Monthly Budget Report-General Fund Revenues June 2015 (unaudited) Percentage Of Year Completed 50.00% Over % 2015 June YTD (Under) of Budget Type Budget Actual Actual Budget Received Ad Valorem Taxes $13,266,155 0 8,676 ($13,257,479) 0.07% (1) Licenses 221,565 17,890 197,783 ($23,782) 89.27% Permits 800,000 108,020 571,992 ($228,008) 71.50% Federal Grants 0 0 2,103 $2,103 State Aid 261,600 5,141 15,060 ($246,540) 5.76% (2) Hennepin County Aid 31,205 0 25,000 ($6,205) (3) Charges For Services: General Government 19,065 450 10,114 ($8,951) 53.05% Public Safety 176,120 10,471 95,271 ($80,849) 54.09% Public Works 141,000 16,540 75,875 ($65,125) 53.81% Park & Rec 396,300 15,520 160,273 ($236,027) 40.44% Other Funds 841,500 55,155 345,947 ($495,553) 41.11% Fines & Forfeitures 320,425 26,490 136,405 ($184,020) 42.57% (4) , Interest On Investments 100,000 0 0 ($100,000) 0.00% (5) Miscellaneous Revenue 227,200 19,763 102,016 ($125,184) 44.90% Transfers In 100,000 8,333 50,000 ($50,000) 50.00% (6) TOTAL Revenue $16,902,135 $283,773 $1,796,515 ($15,105,620) 10.63% Notes: (1) Payments are received in July, December, and January (delinquencies). (2) Police Training will be paid in August. Safe and Sober is billed on time spent. (3)Violent Offenders Task Force is run by Hennepin County. (4) Fines/Forfeitures are through May 2015. (5) Investment income is allocated at year end. (6)Transfers are monthly. City of Golden Valley Monthly Budget Report-Conservation/Recycling Enterprise Fund June 2015 (unaudited) Over 2015 June YTD (Under) % Budget Actual Actual Budget Current Revenue Hennepin County Recycling Grant 56,770 32,369 32,369 (24,401) 57.02% Recycling Charges 332,875 25,258 136,770 (196,105) 41.09% Miscellaneous Revenues 3,000 0 0 (3,000) Interest on Investments 9,000 0 0 (9,000) 0.00% (1) Total Revenue 401,645 57,627 169,139 (232,506) 42.11% Expenses: Recycling 451,460 62,355 179,095 (272,365) 39.67% (2) Total Expenses 451,460 62,355 179,095 (272,365) 39.67% (1) Interest Earnings are allocated at year-end. (2) Republic Services are billed through May. Rebate YTD-$578.28 City of Golden Valley Monthly Budget Report-Water and Sewer Utility Enterprise Fund 1une, 2015(unaudited) Over 2015 lune YTD (Under) % Budget Actual Actual Budget Current Revenue Water Charges 4,360,500 338,594 1,536,551 (2,823,949) 35.24% Emergency Water Supply 183,600 12,967 65,239 (118,361) 35.53% Sewer Charges 3,276,450 283,192 1,517,471 (1,758,979) 46.31% Meter Sales 8,000 2,446 7,557 (443) 94.46% MCES Grant Program 0 0 20,615 20,615 Penalties 110,000 15,947 71,208 (38,792) 64.73% Charges for Other Services 90,000 3,866 59,722 (30,278) 66.36% State Water Testing Fee Pass Through 45,500 3,424 19,134 (26,366) 42.05% Sale of Assets/Misc Receipts 10,000 0 0 (10,000) 0.00% Certificate of Compliance 75,000 8,625 44,750 (30,250) 59.67% Interest Earnings 15,000 0 0 (15,000) 0.00% Total Revenue 8,174,050 669,061 3,342,247 (4,831,803) 40.89% Expenses: Utility Administration 2,436,590 56,716 748,717 (1,687,873) 30.73% Sewer Maintenance 2,752,485 218,690 1,455,445 (1,297,040) 52.88% Water Maintenance 4,571,485 251,567 1,928,855 (2,642,630) 42.19% Total Expenses 9,760,560 526,973 4,133,017 (5,627,543) 42.34% City of Golden Valley Monthly Budget Report-Brookview Golf Course Enterprise Fund June, 2015(unaudited)Course Opened March 13, 2015 Over 2015 June YTD (Under) % Budget Actual Actual Budget Current Revenue Green Fees 838,265 155,077 375,644 (462,621) 44.81% Driving Range Fees 105,000 27,743 68,484 (36,516) 65.22% Par 3 Fees 137,370 30,355 71,886 (65,484) 52.33% Lawn Bowling 38,000 9,931 10,593 (27,407) 27.88% Pro Shop Sales 80,000 13,879 39,287 (40,713) 49.11% Pro Shop Rentals 244,000 44,933 102,746 (141,254) 42.11% Concession Sales 281,000 76,529 148,381 (132,619) 52.80% Other Revenue 72,280 5,948 65,455 (6,825) 90.56% Interest Earnings 2,000 0 0 (2,000) 0.00% (1) Less:Credit Card Charges/Sales Tax (35,000) (4,484) (6,182) 28,818 17.66% Total Revenue 1,762,915 359,911 876,294 (886,621) 49.71% Expenses: Golf Operations 682,945 72,235 335,199 (347,746) 49.08% (2) Course Maintenance 695,665 51,882 305,449 (390,216) 43.91% Pro Shop 106,300 14,820 87,037 (19,263) 81.88% Grill 244,355 44,193 102,836 (141,519) 42.08% Driving Range 49,715 8,135 22,250 (27,465) 44.76% Par 3 Course 25,770 3,962 10,043 (15,727) 38.97% Lawn Bowling 20,175 2,437 6,050 (14,125) 29.99% Total Expenses 1,824,925 197,664 868,864 (956,061) 47.61% (1) Interest Earnings are allocated at year-end. (2) Depreciation is allocated at year-end. City of Golden Valley Monthly Budget Report- Motor Vehicle Licensing Enterprise Fund June 2015 (unaudited) Over 2015 June YTD (Under) % Budget Actual Actual Budget Current Revenue Interest Earnings 2,000 0 0 (2,000) 0.00% (1) Charges for Services 406,330 37,318 204,059 (202,271) 50.22% Total Revenue 408,330 37,318 204,059 (204,271) 49.97% Expenses: Motor Vehicle Licensing 408,330 32,288 191,438 (216,892) 46.88% Total Expenses 408,330 32,288 191,438 (216,892) 46.88% (1) Interest Earnings are allocated at year-end. City of Golden Valley Monthly Budget Report-Storm Utility Enterprise Fund June, 2015 (unaudited) Over 2015 June YTD (Under) % Budget Actual Actual Budget Current Revenue Interest Earnings 45,000 0 0 (45,000) 0.00% (1) Storm Sewer Charges 2,228,920 179,903 1,069,975 (1,158,945) 48.00% Bassett Creek Watershed 1,453,000 35,147 (1,417,853) 2.42% Miscellaneous Receipts 0 0 0 0 State Grant-Other 0 0 0 0 Total Revenue 3,726,920 179,903 1,105,122 (2,621,798) 29.65% Expenses: Storm Utility 2,510,590 27,709 693,287 (1,817,303) 27.61% (2) Street Cleaning 125,535 4,098 60,112 (65,423) 47.88% Environmental Control 294,465 13,583 122,852 (171,613) 41.72% Debt Service Payments 171,220 0 151,941 (19,279) 88.74% Total Expenses 3,101,810 45,390 1,028,192 (2,073,618) 33.15% (1) Interest Earnings are allocated at year-end. (2) Depreciation is allocated at year-end and. 2015 Equipment Replacement Fund(CIP)-Fund 5700 2015 lune YTD Budget Total Actual Remaining Revenues: Proceeds-Certificate of Indebtedness 800,000 0 0 (800,000) Sale of Assets 35,000 0 20,000 (15,000) Miscellaneous 0 0 761 761 Interest Earnings(allocated at year end) 20,365 0 0 (20,365) Total Revenues 855,365 0 20,761 (834,604� Expenditures: Program# Project Number Project Name 5700 Bond Expenditures 0 0 0 0 5701 V&E-001 Marked Squad Cars(Police) 75,000 29,762 63,888 11,112 (1) 5702 V&E-002 Computers and Printers(Finance) 80,000 0 31,363 48,637 5703 V&E-004 Phone System(Finance) 69,500 0 0 69,500 5712 V&E-024 Unmarked Police Vehicle 34,000 0 35,623 (1,623) 5737 V&E-027 Rotary Mower(Park) 98,000 0 95,641 2,359 5793 V&E-050 Bobcat Toolcat 50,000 0 46,000 4,000 (2) 5742 V&E-082 Fire Pumper 575,000 284,463 290,537 5762 V&E-091 Pickup Truck(Park) 50,000 0 27,443 22,557 5800 V&E-087 Pickup Truck(Fire) 40,000 4,612 30,314 9,686 5786 V&E-083 Passenger Vehicle(Fire) 40,000 0 30,222 9,778 5722 V&E-127 800 Mhz Radios(Fire) 165,500 0 151,556 13,944 5721 V&E-129 800 Mhz Radios(Police) 162,180 14,390 155,526 6,654 Total Expenditures 1,439,180 48,764 952,039 487,141 (1)Computers are replaced every 4-S years and purchased throughout the year based on available time. (2)First half payment due 90 days prior to delivery. ���y �� �� Police De artment V�. �r p 763-593-8079/763-593-8098(fax) .�b�. ��.°��� _ � , . Executive Summary For Action Golden Valley City Council Meeting July 21, 2015 Agenda Item 3. Q. Authorization to Sign Agreement with Sojourner Project Inc. for pomestic Assault Intervention Services Prepared By Stacy Carlson, Chief of Police Summary The Golden Valley Police Department partners with Sojourner Project to provide advocacy services to domestic assault victims. In return for services, the City of Golden Valley pays Sojourner Project $15,000 annually. This contract is the same as in the past,just the dates have been changed to reflect services provided in the year 2015. Attachments • Intervention Services Agreement with Sojourner Project Inc. (3 pages) Recommended Action Motion to authorize the Mayor and City Manager to sign the Intervention Services Agreement with Sojourner Project, Inc. for domestic assault intervention services. INTERVENTION SERVICES AGREEMENT WITH SOJOURNER PROJECT, INC. THIS AGREEMENT is made between the CITY OF GOLDEN VALLEY (the "City") and SOJOURNER PROJECT, INC., a Minnesota non-profit corporation (the "Provider"). The Provider is a non-profit organization that offers community-based intervention programs for domestic abuse incidents arising in the west suburban area, including the City of Golden Valley. The Provider has requested that the City contribute funds to help pay its expenses. The City has agreed to pay funds to the Provider on a fee-for-service basis. The parties wish to set forth in writing the terms and conditions of their agreement. Therefore, in return for the mutual agreements set forth below, the parties agree as follows: 1. TERM. The term of this Agreement shall be from January 1, 2015 through December 31, 2015 regardless of the dates of execution, unless terminated earlier as provided herein. 2. SERVICES. The Provider shall provide the required personnel and related support services and supplies it deems necessary to intervene in domestic abuse incidents that arise in the City, consistent with its past practices and procedures, working with the City in providing services (defined below). Services shall include Provider's advocacy for and meeting with victims of domestic abuse, and follow-up services provided by the Provider during the term of the Agreement (the "Services"). The Provider shall not provide Services for defendants charged with domestic assault, fifth degree assault, disorderly conduct, or order for protection violations. The City agrees to cooperate with the Provider as deemed appropriate by the City's Chief of Police to ensure the timely provision of the Services. Recipients of Services shall not be financially charged for or required to pay for Services. Individuals eligible for Services may decline Services. 3. TRAINING. As deemed appropriate by the City's Chief of Police, the City will make its Police Department personnel available for training with respect to the aims and procedures of the intervention program described in this Agreement. The Provider agrees to provide this training without charge during the term of this Agreement. -1- 4. PAYMENT. The Provider shall record the number of cases referred to it by the City. On a quarterly basis, Provider shall submit a statement to the City which contains the following information: a. A list of cases for which Services have been provided, designated by the name of the alleged abuser. b. A description of the Services provided including a description of the hourly service provided, using blind numbers assigned to each case so that confidentiality of the Service recipients can be maintained. The City agrees to pay a total amount of$15,000 for all of the Services provided during the term of the Agreement. 5. RECORDS. The Provider shall maintain such records as are deemed necessary by the City to insure that the Services are provided as represented by the Provider. Upon execution of the Agreement, Provider shall have each employee and volunteer keep separate time records of their time spent each day, specifying the amount of time spent on each case. These records shall remain the property of the Provider. The Provider may maintain the records in a manner that insures confidentiality to Service recipients; however, it shall provide full disclosure of identities to the City's auditor if so requested. 6. DISCRIMINATION. The Provider agrees not to discriminate in providing Services under this Agreement on the basis of race, sex, creed, national origin, age or religion. 7. CANCELLATION. This Agreement may be cancelled by either party at any time, with or without cause, upon thirty (30) days' written notice, delivered by mail or in person, to the other party. In that case, the City shall pay only for those Services rendered in accordance with this Agreement before the termination date. 8. INSURANCE. The Provider agrees that it will, at all times during the term of this Agreement, have and keep in force a general liability insurance policy with coverage in the amount of at least $1,000,000 per occurrence for bodily injury, and $1,000,000 per occurrence for property damage. The policy shall name the City as an additional insured and provide that it shall be primary and non- contributory coverage for a loss arising from services provided pursuant to -2- this agreement. A certificate of insurance will be provided to the City before Services are rendered under this Agreement. 9. UNSPECIFIED SERVICES. The City will honor no claim for Services not specified in this Agreement. 10.ENTIRE AGREEMENT. The entire agreement of the parties is contained in this document. This Agreement supersedes all oral agreements and negotiations between the parties relating to the subject matter of this Agreement. Any alterations, amendments, deletions or waivers of any provisions of this Agreement shall be valid only when placed in writing and signed by both parties. 11.INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR. Nothing in this Agreement is intended, nor shall be construed, to create the relationship of partners, or employer/employee befinreen the Parties. The Provider, its officers, agents, employees, and volunteers are, and shall remain for all purposes and services under this Agreement, independent contractors. Dated: CITY OF GOLDEN VALLEY By: Mayor And: City Manager Dated: �O/ � SOJOURNER PROJECT, INC. By: Executive tor And: _ � - Fin nce Manager -3- Cl��1 t?� ,..� �.� �t� � �� �,�,. �',� City Administration/Council 763 593 8003/763 593 8109(fax) Executive Summary For Action Golden Valley City Council Meeting July 21, 2015 Agenda Item 3. R. Adopt 2016-2018 Strategic Plan Summary Report Prepared By Thomas D. Burt, City Manager Summary At the July 14, 2015 Council/Manager meeting, the City Council reviewed the 2016 - 2018 Strategic Plan Summary Report and directed staff to update the "Target Date" on the Strategic Priority Initiatives in Appendix VI and move forward with adoption. Staff has updated those dates as well as further refined some of the steps. Attachments • 2016-2018 Strategic Plan Summary Report (41 pages) Recommendation Motion to adopt the 2016-2018 Strategic Plan Summary Report dated May 2015. • � • i . ' • � . • . � � i • May zo�5 ��ty of o en va e C I?AIGRAPP, ��c tMPROVING ORGANIZATIONS AND THE PEOPLE WHO LEAD THEM C f�AI G R!APP, LLC 1MPRCJVINr-�; c�! �:�f�1Vd2/�:`: ;? Lf=AL.� 1NEM May 11, 2015 RE: FY zoi6-zo�8 Strategic Plan-City of Golden Valley Dear Mayor Harris, I am pleased to present this FY zo�6-zo�8 Strategic Plan and Summary Report to the City of Golden Valley.The plan reflects the organization's commitment to strategic thinking, measurable results and the delivery of quality services. Thank you for the opportunity to assist the�ity with this project.You,the City Council and senior staff are to be commended for your dedication and effort. I also want to thank Tom Burt and Chantell Knauss for the help and support provided during the process. Yours truly, � Craig R. Rapp President CI?AIGRAPP,��c i:�iicnc;<�:40 East Chicago Avenue�340.Chicago,IL 60611 • nnuara�n��<;;�s 3208 West Lake Street#142,Minneapolis,MN 55416 rnmFrz CraigRappLLC • FncE[�cx>K:CraigRappLLC • 1ou rat r,.806550-0692 • CraigRapp.com,CompassPeerGroup.com Table of Contents ExecutiveSummary .............................................................................................................. z Strategic Plan Summary zoi6-zoi8............................................................................................... 3 City of Golden Valley Strategic Planning Process......................................................................... 4 Effective Governance, Culture and Value Proposition.................................................. 4 Reviewing the Environment, Setting Strategic Priorities............................................................ 5 Defining Strategic Priorities.......................................................................................................... 7 Key Outcome Indicators By Priority.............................................................................................. 7 Implementing the Vision: Developing Strategic Initiatives and Action Plans ............................ 8 Strategic Planning Participants..................................................................................................... �o Appendices: SWOT Analysis Data................................................................................................. i Appendix i: SWOT Results — Strengths....................................................................................... ii Appendix z: SWOT Results —Weaknesses.................................................................................. v Appendix 3: SWOT Results —Opportunities................................................................................ viii Appendix 4: SWOT Results —Threats.......................................................................................... xiv Appendix 5:SWOT Results — Highest Priorities.......................................................................... xviii Appendix 6: Strategic Initiatives-Action Plans............................................................ xix City of Golden Valley Strategic Plan Report zoi6-zo�8 � March zoi5 , . . , a �� e : -�. . ! , , � . , �, . � b� i . On March iz and �4, and April i3, zoi5,the City of Golden Valley's leadership team engaged in a teambuilding and strategic planning process. The three meetings yielded a draft strategic plan for the three-year period zo�6-zo�8. The strategic plan consists of a set of four strategic priorities,which are the highest priority issues for the next three years; a series of key outcome indicators,which describe desired outcomes and success measures;and a list of strategic initiatives,which define the actions that will be taken to ensure successful effort. At the initial planning meeting on March iz,the group discussed their operating philosophy, culture, and value proposition. In addition,they reviewed their operating environment and identified a list of challenges facing the community. Based upon those challenges, on March �4, the group identified a set of strategic priorities for the performance period.This was followed by the development of a set of key outcome indicators(KOI's)for each priority,which defined desired outcomes and measurable targets. On April i3,the senior staff created a set of strategic initiatives and action plans to address the priorities and achieve the key outcomes. The strategic priorities, key outcome indicators, and strategic initiatives are summarized on the following page: 2 City of Golden Valley Strategic Plan Report zoi6-zo�8 � March zo�5 ��ty u� �u�ae� � vaiiey- �tr-ate�ic ��a� � �u����i� �d�-y zuit�-7b Strategic Priority Key Outcome Target Strategic Initiatives Indicator(KOI) Number of Households i8o new occupied units a)Develop small area land use plans for Key redevelopment sites –Hsg component targeted redev areas rgeted completed,flood mitigation plan at site b)Review entitlement ti�velopment ar��° completed–Medicine Lake process � � ' '� '�" `"�`�"�� � Rd.�Winnetka Ave --One project occupied-55 c)Flood mitigation at west area Library crossing area –First project underway— 55 winnetka(N&S) d)Develop small –Douglas Drive redev area- business attraction& Douglas Dr.apts.revitalized expansion strategy Locally grown businesses new small businesses started reflecting community needs Respectful discourse %adherence to adopted a)Adopt code of values and standards conduct Timely decision-making %or>agenda items b)Continue quarterly �_p��, ��;�,f handled at initial meeting formal dinners Council process Rules and procedures are c)Publish qtrly summary +,t;:r�rr��;;?�;c adherence followed %of the time of Council actions-recap d)Engage facilitator on Carver Governance e)Council to attend LMC trng&orientation Community Center Completed a)Determine decision process-Comm.Ctr. lnfrastruCture Fire Stations Plan adopted with funding b)Dev cost�benefit and i�.':aintenance <+r;d strategy LOS analysis-Fire stations e r�,t���:,r,c,_;����n° c)Comp analysis- LRT municipal consent Infrastructure plan adopted �nfrastructure impacts- LRT Infrastructure plans Adopted plans with funding d)Dev all asset analysis- strategy-all assets and wJcosts infrastructure Reserve levels Reserve policy met-all a)Establish comp plan funds for reserve levels c i'�:=±i;;r� �+<;j;,iCii:,,, Bond rating Maintain Aai b)Eval level of service across org Operating expenditures Maintain current LOS–all c)Eval bond rating departments scorecard d)Dev possible new rev Alternative revenues z new sources sources 3 City of Golden Valley Strategic Plan Report zoi6-zoi8 � March zo�5 . , „� „ : . . .._ - -; ,- • , �. � , ._. . , ; . �, Strategic planning is a process that helps leaders examine the current state of the organization, determine a desired future state, establish priorities, and define a set of actions to achieve specific outcomes.The process followed by the City was designed to answer four key questions: (i)Where are we now?(z)Where are we going?(3) How will we get there?(4)What will we do? Setting Direction,Value Proposition and Organizational Culture On Thursday March iz,the group reviewed and discussed the separate leadership roles of the Council and the staff in strategic planning, as well as the collaborative approach they must take for a successful outcome.They discussed the need for a compelling vision, or"Why?"The group discussed their current community vision statements developed for Envision Golden Valley, and concluded that they fairly represented their"Why". The group then turned to a discussion of the organization's culture and the value proposition. The culture and value proposition provide the foundation for the way in which services are delivered and strategic direction is set. Four core cultures and three value propositions(including strengths and weaknesses)were presented and summarized: Three Value Propositions Operational Excellence(Wal-Mart, Southwest Airlines) ❑ They adjust to us(command and control) Product/Service Leadership(Apple,Google) ❑ They`ooh and `ah'over our products/services(competence) Customer Intimacy(Nordstrom, Ritz-Carlton) ❑ We get to know them and solve their problems/satisfy their needs(collaborative) Four Core Cultures Control Culture(Military-command and control) Strengths:Systematic,clear, conservative Weaknesses: Inflexible, compliance more important than innovation Competence Culture(Research Lab-best and brightest) Strengths: Results oriented, efficient, systematic Weaknesses:Values can be ignored, human element missing, over planning Collaboration Culture(Family-teams) Strengths: Manages diversity well, versatile,talented Weaknesses: Decisions take longer,group think, short-term oriented 4 City of Golden Valley Strategic Plan Report zo�6-zoi8 � March zo�5 Cultivation Culture(Non-profit/religious group-mission/values) Strengths:Creative, socially responsible, consensus oriented Weaknesses: Lacks focus,judgmental, lack of control The Council and staff engaged in a discussion regarding the organization's value proposition- coming to a general consensus that operational excellence is the primary value proposition- with the secondary emphasis on customer intimacy.The group agreed to continue this discussion in order to determine the changes necessary to achieve the desired state. Reviewing the Environment, Setting Strategic Priorities Following the culture and value proposition discussion,the leadership team began the process of developing the strategic plan.The first step taken in the process was an assessment of the environment within which the City operates.This was done via a SWOT(Strengths,Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats)analysis: a process that examines the organization's internal strengths and weaknesses, as well as the opportunities and threats in the external environment. To facilitate this, a SWOT questionnaire was distributed to the City Council and senior staff in advance of the planning session.The SWOT process revealed the most frequently mentioned characteristics in each area: � • Staff • Communication • Service levels • Reputation • Collaboration • Infrastructure �;1IE�,�F;PJ'�� �� � �� • Lack of Council leadership&respect for staff • Condition of assets& infrastructure • Lack of public's respect for process • Lack of financial resources i,�r, : r. � • Development and redevelopment • City staff leadership-to grow • Vibrant local economy • Infrastructure needs identified-solid base • Resident community commitment ���:�. ��� • Taxes/debt • Aging infrastructure • Economic development • City Council 5 City of Golden Valley Strategic Plan Report zo�6-zoi8 � March zoi5 The group then engaged in an exercise using the summarized SWOT data. They compared strengths with opportunities and weaknesses with threats,to determine which opportunities would maximize strengths, and which weaknesses would be exacerbated by the threats.This effort helped to crystalize the current challenges and opportunities facing the community.The results of this analysis are listed below: ��,, � ,;�, r ;�; : ,�; � i ���i! � :i �. ,�, r:. t� , , ��� �� �i � • Targeted development and redevelopment • Effective Governance • Infrastructure maintenance and enhancement . ��,f<.���� � ` �.� . �,t-,f_ �i��. �F��.t2E� f���i �t�,� . irc��ri iiaF��>r_�nin�;1 • Effective Governance • Maintaining assets &infrastructure • Financial stability This led to the identification of a broad set of issues and/or challenges facing the community: ;r � ,:��I �. � • Succession planning • Development and redevelopment • Effective governance • Maintaining infrastructure • Maintain/maximize resident connection/commitment • Financial stability • Council-staff relations Once the current challenges were identified,the group discussed the issues that were most important over the next three years. From that discussion, a set of five Strategic Priorities emerged.They are: i. Targeted development and redevelopment z. Effective governance 3. Infrastructure maintenance and enhancement 4. Financial Stability 6 City of Golden Valley Strategic Plan Report zoi6-zoi8 � March zoi5 Defining the Strategic Priorities In order to clarify the meaning of each priority in the context of Golden Valley,the group identified key concepts for each.The concepts are listed below, and will be used by the group to establish the final definitions. � � � ���i<���ldnd I<<��lE_�,���I<�E��rnent • Corridors, strategic redevelopment plan, 394 corridor, 55 corridor, GV downtown, Hennepin County roadways, strategic subsidy, higher density residential, selective public investment-commercial and housing, LRT station area development �.i�, • Functional plan that Council and staff agree upon, good communication and teamwork, attention to/follow process, respected values, meeting decorum,timely decision-making ��i�. �. =int���r,� ,. i�. ��������1 � Areas of need,top priorities, identifying costs, plan for the future, citizen engagement and understanding,addressing growth and needs, core services, maintain standards and reliability,value engineering-good quality for the investment � c . • Spending is balanced-grow reserves,expand tax base,financial plans in place,maintain bond rating, maintain current level of services�accommodating future needs,wise use of resources and approaches, improved efficiencies and effectiveness Determining Success: Defining the Key Outcome Indicators After identifying strategic priorities, the group focused on developing a set of Key Outcome Indicators(KOI's). KOI's define what success looks like and includes a description of successful outcomes, expressed with measures and targets. The KOI's provide organizational focus by establishing a limited set of desired outcomes and performance targets for achievement for each strategic priority.The alignment created between KOI's and Strategic Priorities is important, not only for clarity, but for maintaining a disciplined focus on the desired results. Key Outcome Indicators, by priority are: a. KOI: Number of Households;Target: i8o new occupied units b. KOI: Key redevelopment sites;Target:--Hsg component completed,flood mitigation plan at site completed--Medicine Lake Rd./Winnetka Ave; First project underway-55 7 City of Golden Valley Strategic Plan Report zoi6-zoi8 � March zo�5 Winnetka (N&S);One project occupied-55 west area; Douglas Drive redev area-Douglas Dr. apts. revitalized c. KOI: Locally grown businesses;Target:_new small businesses started reflecting community needs a. KOI: Respectful discourse;Target:_%adherence to adopted values and standards b. KOI:Timely decision-making;Target:_%or more of agenda items handled at initial meetings c. KOI:Council process adherence;Target: Rules of procedure are followed_%of the time '� � � nl,� _ .�����;� a. KOI:Community Center;Target:Completed b. KOI: Fire stations;Target: Plan adopted with funding strategy c. KOI: LRT municipal consent;Target: Infrastructure plan adopted d. KOI: Infrastructure plans;Target:Adopted plans with funding strategy-all assets and infrastructure :�. i1r,<�,�. �t:ii�i, a. KOI: Reserve levels;Target: Reserve policy met-all funds b. KOI: Bond rating;Target: Maintain Aai c. KOI: Operating expenditures;Target: Maintain current levels of service-all departments d. KOI:Alternative revenues;Target: z new sources Implementing the Vision: Developing Strategic Initiatives and Action Plans To successfully address the strategic priorities and achieve the intended outcomes expressed in the KOI's, it is necessary to have a focused set of actions, including detailed implementation steps to guide organizational effort.The�ity of Golden Valley will accomplish this through development of strategic initiatives for each priority.Strategic initiatives are broadly described, but narrowly focused activities that are aligned with the priorities, and targeted to the achievement of outcomes expressed in the KOI's. The senior staff, during a strategic planning session on April�3,developed a set of strategic initiatives, along with detailed action steps: � '. � , . . � u�_� �, a. Develop small area land use plans for targeted redevelopment areas b. Review entitlement process c. Flood mitigation at Library crossing area d. Develop small business attraction and expansion strategy 8 City of Golden Valley Strategic Plan Report zoi6-zoi8 � March zoi5 a. Adopt code of conduct b. Continue quarterly formal dinners c. Publish quarterly summary of Council actions-recap motions and actions d. Engage facilitator on Carver Governance e. Council members to attend LMC training and orientation sessions � � � �� , � � �r .�I� ,! a. Determine decision-making process for Community Center project b. Develop a cost/benefit and level of service analysis for proposed fire stations c. Conduct comprehensive analysis of infrastructure impacts of LRT d. Develop an all asset analysis with costs <=}. rinanciGl �-� � � a. Establish a comprehensive plan for reserve levels b. Evaluate the levels of service across the organization c. Evaluate a bond rating scorecard d. Develop possible new revenue sources 9 City of Goiden Valley Strategic Plan Report zo�6-zo�8 ( March zoi5 Strategic Planning Participants The strategic plan was developed with the hard work and dedication of many individuals.The City Council,with its foresight and dedication led the way,taking time out their schedules to commit to long-term thinking.They defined a direction and a set of outcomes that are important to the community. The senior staff supported the City Council and offered challenges to conventional thinking. �:dF�d n C: e� , , .�.. Shep Harris, Mayor Joanie Clausen,Councilmember Larry Fonnest,Councilmember Steve Schmidgall,Councilmember Andy Snope,Councilmember Cit�� F�r;n,iris±raiia���C�c�:¢;�trtment Staff Tom Burt,City Manager Rick Birno, Parks&Recreation Director Stacy Carlson, Police Chie f John Crelly, Fire Chief �hantell Knauss,Assistant City Manager Mark Nevinski, Physical Development Director Sue Virnig, Finance Director Cheryl Weiler,Communications Manager 10 h r i=t�i'�I U i L't� SWOT Analysis Data In order to clarify the strategic challenges confronting the community,the City Council and senior staff conducted a review of the current operating environment using a SWOT analysis methodology. SWOT stands for Strengths,Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats.The internal strengths and weaknesses and the external opportunities and threats were assessed.This was done in two parts:(�)in advance of the retreat, all participants completed a SWOT questionnaire;and (z)the group participated in a facilitated process that used the questionnaire results as the basis for analysis and decision-making. The following Appendices contain the complete information contained in the questionnaire responses. i SWOT Results — Strengths • Services • Staff • Reputation • Good service delivery-low crime, good fire response;solid,traditional programs; handles day-to-day operations well. • Good infrastructure—roads, homes, businesses, etc. • Decent communications for daily operations and current demographics. • Excellent staff with great skill,training, and experience. � Great amenities: location,green space,transportation connections,water bodies. • Sophisticated, enlightened, educated residents. • Sound, relatively new street system. • Appropriate array of facilities and equipment to serve the residents. • A top notch professional staff and crew that delivers high quality services. • A staff that is responsive and always considerate of our resident's perceptions and needs. • Employees who take pride in their jobs and in the functioning of our city. • A working knowledge by staff of the inner workings of the city; utility systems, building maintenance, codes, ordnances,zoning. • Rigid enforcement of city and state code during inspections for remodel or new building. • A comprehensive, easy to navigate, information filled website. • A City Council,Commissioners, and Board Members who are passionate about the well being of this city. • A city manager that is knowledgeable and respected by the staff that works for him. • Well educated and experienced staff • Communication to residents • Responsiveness to resident requests • An experienced staff across organizational levels • Fiscally sound • High levels of service to public ii • The City's greatest strength is its dedicated and experienced staff that is in the trenches getting the job done each and every day.These individuals are well trained and bring a wealth of experience to the job every day. • The great working relationships between each of the departments.The relationships are strong and each group works well with other groups at times when cooperation is critical. • Historically, staff has had a reasonable working environment,good equipment,good support from management and the ability to get critical training to help the employee function at high levels within their position. • The City has talented staff that is creative in finding solutions to tough problems. • Staff, Management Team, current City Manager—across the board, GV staff goes out of their way to provide exceptional service to its residents and community. Staff is innovative, adaptable, highly skilled and knowledgeable.The Management Team alone has over ioo years of service to the City of Golden Valley;this does not include the experience they bring from having worked at other organizations prior to being hired in GV. • GV's reputation in the public sector is stellar. Comparable cities want to be us and people want to work here. • Talented,experienced, and committed staff; Organization is committed to employees (training, benefits,flexibility). • High level of service to residents. • Communications(newsletter,website, information)is very strong. • Ability/willingness to partner with neighboring communities. • Concentration of high quality, well-known companies; diverse economy. • Location • Road system,trails, parks • Variety of housing options • Positive reputation/perception of the City in general. • Upper Management has a great working environment that involves collaborative discussions. Brainstorming ideas have been welcomed with today's climate. Problems can be resolved with discussions. • We have great employees who care about what they do and want to make Golden Valley a better place. • We have good leaders from the top(city manager)down who expect high standards from our work but also recognize the importance of family and a personal life. • Innovation is welcomed and encouraged. • Stability, good benefits, and fair treatment draw good employees 111 Hf�i��ivUi�'� i1 SWOT Results —Weaknesses • Keeping up with taking care of our roads, infrastructure, etc. (Everything is so expensive and getting worse) • Lack of cohesive leadership from elected officials. • Lack of respect for staff from some elected officials. If we're here to provide professional input/advice,why don't they believe us or listen? • Deteriorated infrastructure. • Cowardly, ignorant,self-absorbed leadership(the Council). • Significant burden of debt from previous infrastructure improvements limits resources available for current needs and wants. • This may be true of all local government, but there seems to be a disdain for the public process and legalities from some special interest groups who are supported by some council members.When staff is asked to overlook policies or make exceptions for those who don't want to follow the same rules as the rest of our residents, it creates a huge credibility gap followed by lack of trust. • Upper Management can be challenged with political needs and fast decision-making. Communication needs are challenged when decisions are made quickly without setting the stage first. • Council should set policy and so the City Manager can carry out them. • Need for investment in buildings. • Use of and Investment in technology to create greater efficiencies. • Financial situation is concerning. Need to diversify revenue, manage debt. • Keeping pace with infrastructure investment. • Lack of leadership and disfunctionality by the City Council, specifically the Mayor.The City Council's role in the organization is to set the policies and goals.This Council is mucking around in the minutia of day-to-day operations,getting in the way of the City Manager and staff doing their jobs effectively. • At times, I believe that the work environment gets to political and critical decisions are being made not based on good practices, science or code requirements, rather decisions have been based on small citizen groups'complaints.This can be seen during City Council meetings. • The City's inability to attract and retain good viable businesses for redevelopment opportunities in the City iv • Right now,the City Council is the city's greatest weakness and frankly, a liability. Several hate to deal with conflict,do not understand city government and its many processes,seem to violate open meeting laws on a regular basis, readily disregard the City Attorney's advice, and try to make rules and changes based on the wishes of a single resident when they voice displeasure with a given issue. The Mayor is openly critical of city staff-leading to a high level of distrust of him among city employees, he has sent several emails asking for favors for his friends, and he unmistakably has a bias against female employees. • Funding for capital projects • Tendency to be reactive rather than proactive • Communication and opportunities for education delivery to our residents. • Timely execution by staff of requirements or expectations. Examples: o Appointment of CMC members(last minute) o Appointment of CAC and BAC members(last minute) o Expediting development plans through the process(Pennsylvania development) o E-cig ordinance(several months, easy language fix) o Brew-Pub ordinance(started in early spring of�0�4,dropped,finished February zoi5) o Bike trail,connectivity discussions(never) • Rigid enforcement of city and state code during inspections for remodel or new building. • An unsure interpretation of city code and ordinances. • A difference in vision and path between Council and Staff. • The inability of the Council to make a decision in a timely manner,or ever... • A city manager that may need to have the reset button pressed, no fault of Mr. Burt, but just to bring a fresh, new, different vision for the city. v rii�rLiVuin i11 SWOT Results —Opportunities • Economy and having to raise taxes • Create coordinated pedestrian-friendly economic development/infrastructure for downtown GV. • New community center. • New management leadership. • �ong-range planning to guide short-range decision-making. • Installation of a new City Manager. • Several choice sites for desirable development, both residential and commercial, guided by the long-range planning mentioned above. • Economic development opportunities presented by a robust economy and the future plans to build the Blue Line Extension through a portion of Golden Valley as well as redesign of the Douglas drive corridor. • A great staff that seems to be functioning very well together and that also possess the knowledge of the inner workings of our city and the desire to make things even better. • The desire of the residents who want to be involved in our city. Pride in their city. • A windfall state budget surplus, if we can just get our hands on some of that surplus • The opportunity to hire a new city manager that brings a different; new forward thinking and progressive vision for the future of our city. • Economic development and redevelopment(location—location—location) • Opportunity to revitalize the city to meet the needs of the new younger residents • Continuing the community commitment to youth • There will be a fairly big turnover in the housing stock in the near future, and there is room for development in that area. • There is room for economic development on a commercial level. • There are opportunities to groom mid-level employees for higher levels through succession planning before current officeholders retire. • We currently have a very high satisfaction rating from our citizens based on City surveys. Moving forward we can maintain this, or possibly grow this to a new high level, providing vi that the City Council keeps a focus on what is the greater good for the community and not falling prey to small special interest groups.Currently we seem to be reacting to the small special interest groups. • Redevelopment. Redevelopment of tired commercial�industrial areas of the City will spark additional development and interest. GV is very fortunate that developers and builders both commercial/industrial and residential still view the City as an ideal location. • Redevelopment of underused sites • BRT on Hwy 55 • Enhance sewer capacity to accommodate redevelopment • Attraction of Millennials to Golden Valley • Partnership with neighboring communities • The City of Golden Valley has had great communication with its residents when given the time to communicate the who,what where and when. • The city's location provides multiple opportunities for growth. • The city is well maintained, presenting a good base to build upon for the future. • Golden Valley has an educated population that seems willing to learn and engage about what it takes to keep the community strong. • Citizens seem very pleased with how Golden Valley is run,according to the zo�3 community survey.We must be on the right track. vii t1 Y 't't i V iJ�i\ I V SWOT Results —Threats • Finishing the pavement management problem or at least moving toward that. • Lack of creativity,traditional bureaucratic staff solutions/outlook to economic development opportunities and marketing. • Overemphasizing certain type of infrastructure over others. • No"check"on aggressive police style and prosecution. • Incorrect economic development; stagnating, reactive economic development(e.g.- Lock Up). • Failing infrastructure. • Burden of debt. • Cowardly, ignorant, self-absorbed leadership(the Council). • Financial pressures resulting from resident demands for more services: swimming pool, community center, consolidated trash hauling;while resisting increases in taxes. • High taxes. • Stagnant taxes base growth • High debt load • Barriers to development • Ageing infrastructure • Priority vision • A Council who doesn't understand State Statute, City Code and ordinances or the city attorney/council relationship.Therefore making decisions or conducting themselves in a way that could expose the city to litigation. • A council that doesn't recognize that they were elected to make a decision. Not every decision needs to be made by referendum or by testing the direction of the political and loudest wind blowers. • Resentment • Aging infrastructure • Elected officials micro-managing vs. setting direction/policy • Death by sub-committee, requires substantial staff time xiv • No change in City Council members, need to step up staffing and systems in the area of technology and IT, need to change mindset to that of a first-ring suburb and less of a sleepy,small town mentality. • Manage the increasing pressures to replace aging infrastructure while still providing high quality services to our citizens. • Finding a new City Manager who can continue to work effectively and efficiently with City Council to grow the City of Golden Valley in a positive direction. • Maintaining an adequate Police/ Fire/ Public Works departments to meet the needs of public safety. • The City Council's subjective denial of development proposals. Developments that have been proposed in areas that they are allowed have been denied by Council because they don't"like"the use(recycling center, school for mentally ill children, used car dealership, etc.).This poor decision-making by Council will lead to developers looking to other cities that are developer-friendly. • Debt and costs of reinvestment • Economic environment—loss or reduction of major employers/jobs • High cost of services—sustainability of higher tax rate, user fees • The greatest threat is another recession that will impact the taxpayer.The City has reduced many expenditures and does not have any room to reduce in the future unless we drastically reduce services. • The trend towards partisanship in city elected officials. • The trend towards catering to special interest groups instead making decisions for the greater good. • The constant requests to loosen policies at a time when litigation is rampant. xv /�r'F �ivuii� v SWOT Results — Highest Priorities • Strategic planning for needed replacement of City assets and infrastructure • Dedication to keeping a strong, educated, highly trained workforce • Continued engagement of the community in a meaningful way so residents understand how and why their government works • To work together(Council, Upper Management)on a plan for the greatest needs of maintaining the infrastructure of the city. • Hiring a City Manager that can handle the political pressures and balancing it with the strengths of Upper Management and the Organization. • Improving the financial condition of the city such as bond ratings,fund balances, and operations. • Clear set of priorities for development and reinvestment • Enhanced use of technology to disseminate and manage information • Diversifying revenue streams • Leadership at the Council level. Establishing long-term goals and priorities so everyone, including residents, knows the direction the City is going. • Water and sewer infrastructure.There have been a lot of resources expended on PMP, but not enough on the pipes below.The infrastructure also needs to be repair and capacity expanded in order to allow for economic development/redevelopment. • Economic Development.As a fully developed City, in order to maintain the level of services provided,taxes will need to be raised or their needs to be an increase in tax capacity. • Manage the increasing pressures to replace aging infrastructure while still providing high quality services to our citizens. • Finding a new City Manager who can continue to work effectively and efficiently with City Council to grow the City of Golden Valley in a positive direction. • Maintaining an adequate Police/Fire/Public Works departments to meet the needs of public safety. • Succession planning, economic development, paying down debt. • Developing new fiscal tools for capital reinvestment xvi • Developing a working relationship between elected officials and staff that is respectful, supportive and trusting which creates an environment that focuses on the future • Elected officials directing staff on future policy and setting goals • Take advantage of economic development opportunities presented by a robust economy and the future plans to build the Blue Line Extension through a portion of Golden Valley as well as redesign of the Douglas drive corridor.Create a vision that brings desired retail, housing and services to the city. • Create a more streamlined path to building and development for developers. Not to say relax or do away with any regulations. But to take a close look at our restrictions, including the time and "hoop jumping" it takes for a developer to put a shovel in the ground in this city. If I were a developer I would find it very unattractive to come to Golden Valley as it is in the current system we have now. • Creating a long-term program to begin to fix our aging infrastructure.This will improve our economic development opportunities and attractiveness. All that glitters on the surface isn't gold when just below the surface problems exist. • �ong-range planning. • Intelligent development. • Infrastructure upgrades. • Community Center to replace Brookview • Create concrete strategic housing/economic development/marketing plan for downtown GV and key hubs/arteries. • Upgrades to visible,declining areas of city. • Parks and community center improvements. • Keeping up with taking care of our roads, infrastructure, etc. xvii APPEN DIX VI Strategic Initiatives-Action Plans X���� ..��T o�S +' °� � y � OA .� � tiA CJ +, . C u C .p � p�p C�A � � "6 oA � C �' � C � H � � Q � 0 N r.+ Q O � d Q .a �N +�+ C O L a . — v u y � �n •� � a � f° c L � � � � t �n � U � U -p 'a t �- �- �- \ � � V (.J V C O +�+ ri V1 i ' O � � U l6 � � C O _ � � N v� � Q_ L O � � � V � � _ � O � � T � � � � N c� Y N L y c y � l6 7 � •— � O � � U .".',. 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O�S a � C (n 1041 11110111V II\111\ ' 1 1111111,0111111,011110 101,1,1 Hs 0 10 411111111 11 0 '011 mII',.m Physical Development Department 763-593-8095/763-593-8109-8"109(fax) Executive Summary For Action Golden Valley City Council Meeting July 21, 2015 Agenda Item 4. A. Continued Public Hearing -Amending Chapter 11: Land Use Regulation (Zoning) regarding Cocktail Rooms, Distilleries, and Micro-Distilleries Prepared By Emily Goellner, Associate Planner/Grant Writer Summary Nationwide, micro-distilleries (also known as craft distilleries) are growing by 30 percent each year, according to the American Distilling Institute. The City has received interest from a craft distiller interested in locating in Golden Valley. Based on City Council direction and research on the topic, staff recommends amending the Zoning Code to allow distilleries, micro-distilleries, and cocktail rooms in certain zoning districts. The following recommendations are modeled after zoning code text amendments recently adopted for Breweries and Taprooms. The Planning Commission recommended approval of the following recommendations at an informal public hearing on June 8, 2015. There are several distilleries, micro-distilleries, and cocktail rooms located in Twin Cities Metro Area, with most concentrated in Minneapolis. Most are licensed by the state as micro-distilleries, which produce a significantly less amount of spirits than the large distilleries like Phillips. Besides the production capacity, distilleries and micro-distilleries also differ in that micro-distilleries may apply for an "On-Sale Cocktail Room" License from the City of Golden Valley. They are also permitted to sell their spirits in 375 milliliter bottles in the form of"off-sale" distribution (if the City issues an "Off-Sale Distilled Spirits" license). Distilleries like Phillips are not eligible for a Cocktail Room License and not allowed to conduct "off-sale" transactions on the premises. Distilling Process Distilled spirits are derived from a variety of grains. The most common grains used are rye, wheat, barley, and corn. The grains are milled, mashed, and fermented. Some distilleries complete this process on site and some distilleries ship the prepared grains to the distillery. The fermented grains are liquefied through various stills and then filtered. Then the spirits are barreled and bottled. The most common spirits produced include vodka, gin, and whiskey. Whiskey is typically barrel-aged, so distilleries tend to wait years until serving it in a cocktail room or selling it in bottles. Vodka and gin are typically served in cocktail rooms and sold in bottles first. Recommended Definitions Below are the definitions used in the proposed new ordinance language for each type of facility. These were drafted to incorporate the language used in the state statute and are written similar to other local cities' zoning codes. Proposed Definitions An establishment licensed by the State of Minnesota for the manufacture Distillery of distilled spirits in total quantity exceeding forty thousand (40,000) proof gallons in a calendar year. An establishment licensed by the State of Minnesota for the manufacture Micro-Distillery of distilled spirits in total quantity not to exceed forty thousand (40,000) proof gallons in a calendar year. A facility accessory to a micro-distillery that is licensed by the City for the Cocktail Room on-sale consumption of distilled spirits produced by the distiller pursuant to Minnesota Statutes, Section 340A.22. Recommended Permitted and Conditional Uses Staff reviewed the intent and purpose of each zoning district and the zoning ordinances for Minneapolis, St. Louis Park, Brooklyn Park, Waconia, and St. Paul. From this review, staff recommends adding distilleries, micro-distilleries, and cocktail rooms as permitted and conditional uses as indicated below. Cocktail Room Cocktail Room Zoning District Distillery Micro-Distillery <50%floor area >_50%floor area Light Industrial Permitted Permitted Conditional Industrial Permitted Permitted Permitted Conditional Mixed-Use Conditional Conditional Conditional Recommended Off-Street Parking Requirements The off-street parking requirements for similar uses in the City were used to inform the proposed minimum parking requirements for distilleries and cocktail rooms. There are no parking maximum requirements proposed, so business owners could provide more parking if desired. A distillery has parking needs similar to those of a manufacturing facility, which under the City's zoning ordinance requires 1 space per 500 square feet of floor area. Staff recommends using this requirement for distilleries and micro-distilleries. Most micro-distilleries employ five to ten people for the distilling work. If a micro-distillery were 4,000 square feet, a minimum of 8 parking spaces would be required. If a distillery were 20,000 square feet, 40 parking spaces would be required. A cocktail room would require parking similar to that required of Class III Restaurants, which is 1 space per 60 square feet plus 1 space per 25 square feet of bar area. Staff recommends this minimum parking requirement for the cocktail room portion of a distillery. For taprooms that are accessory to breweries, City Council recommended that there be a reduction in the minimum parking requirement when bicycle parking is provided. Therefore, staff has included that for every 2 bicycle spaces provided, 1 car space may be reduced from minimum parking requirement, for no more than 15% of the required spaces. Liquor Licensing A separate liquor license from the City would be required for all of the above proposed uses after the distillery has obtained a license from the State of Minnesota. The City license requirements would address the hours of operation, outdoor patios, entertainment, capacity by proof gallons per year, bottling standards, conduct on the premises, violations, fees, and special events. The City Clerk is currently leading the work to draft recommendations to amend Chapter 5 of the City Code to provide for these new kinds of licenses. Those recommendations are tentatively scheduled for consideration by City Council in July and August. Attachments • Memo to Planning Commission dated June 8, 2015 (3 pages) • Planning Commission Minutes dated June 8, 2015 (3 pages) • Underlined/Overstruck Version of Section 11.03: Definitions (3 pages) • Underlined/Overstruck Version of Section 11.35: Light Industrial Zoning District (4 pages) • Underlined/Overstruck Version of Section 11.36: Industrial Zoning District (2 pages) • Underlined/Overstruck Version of Section 11.47: Mixed Use Zoning District (2 pages) • Underlined/Overstruck Version of Section 11.70: Off-Street Parking and Loading Regulations (1 page) • Ordinance#567, Amending Chapter 11: Land Use Regulation (Zoning) Regarding Cocktail Rooms, Distilleries and Micro-Distilleries (2 pages) Recommended Action Motion to adopt Ordinance #567, Amending Chapter 11: Land Use Regulation (Zoning) Regarding Cocktails Rooms, Distilleries and Micro-Distilleries. goldol M E M 0 R A N D U M 11 Physical Development tea. E'� Ph Department Y P 763-593-8095/763-593-8109(fax) Date: June 8, 2015 To: Golden Valley Planning Commission From: Emily Goellner, Associate Planner/Grant Writer Subject: Zoning Code Text Amendment—Distilleries & Cocktail Rooms Background Nationwide, craft distilleries are growing by 30 percent each year, according to the American Distilling Institute. The City has received interest from craft distillers interested in locating in Golden Valley. Based on City Council direction and research on the topic, staff recommends amending the Zoning Code to allow for distilleries and cocktail rooms. The recommended zoning code text amendments for Distilleries and Cocktail Rooms are modeled after text amendments recently adopted for Breweries and Taprooms. There are several distilleries and cocktail rooms located in Twin Cities Metro Area, with most concentrated in Minneapolis. Most are licensed by the state as micro-distilleries, which produce a significantly less amount of spirits than the large distilleries like Phillips. The application and renewal fee for a micro distiller's license is much less expensive with the State of Minnesota Department of Public Safety, which was a policy adopted with the 2011 "Surly Bill" at the Minnesota State Legislature to reduce the cost of micro-brewery and taproom licenses as well. The "Surly Bill" also allowed breweries and distilleries to sell their product on site in taprooms and cocktail rooms. Distilling Process Distilled spirits are derived from a variety of grains. The most common grains used are rye, wheat, barley, and corn. The grains are milled, mashed, and fermented. Some distilleries complete this process on site and some distilleries ship the prepared grains to the distillery. The fermented grains are liquefied through various stills and then filtered. Then the spirits are barreled and bottled. The most common spirits produced include vodka, gin, and whiskey. Whiskey is typically barrel-aged, so distilleries tend to wait years until serving it in a cocktail room. Vodka and gin are typically served in cocktail rooms first. Recommended Definitions Below are the definitions used in the proposed new ordinance language for each type of facility. These were drafted to incorporate the language used in the state statute, as well as other local cities' zoning codes. Proposed Definitions Distillery An establishment licensed by the City for the manufacture of distilled spirits. An establishment licensed by the City for the manufacture of distilled spirits in Micro-Distillery total quantity not to exceed 40,000 proof gallons in a calendar year. A facility accessory to a distillery that is licensed by the City where the on-sale Cocktail Room consumption of distilled spirits produced by the distiller is permitted pursuant to Minnesota Statutes, Section 340A.22. Cocktail Rooms According to state law (Minnesota Statutes, Section 340A.22), a micro-distillery cocktail room license authorizes the sale of distilled liquor produced by the distiller for consumption on the premises of or adjacent to one distillery location owned by the distiller. The amount of spirits served may not exceed 15 milliliters (.5 ounces) per variety per person. No more than 45 milliliters (1.5 ounces—equivalent to a single shot glass) may be sampled by any person on any day. With this license, a micro-distillery can sell cocktails to the public within these restrictions. Recommended Permitted and Conditional Uses Staff reviewed the intent and purpose of each zoning district and the zoning ordinances for Minneapolis, St. Louis Park, Brooklyn Park, Waconia, and St. Paul. From this review, staff recommends adding distilleries, micro-distilleries, and cocktail rooms as permitted and conditional uses as indicated below. Cocktail Room Cocktail Room Zoning District Distillery Micro-Distillery <50%floor area >_50%floor area Light Industrial Permitted Permitted Conditional Industrial Permitted Permitted Permitted Conditional Mixed-Use Conditional Conditional Conditional Recommended Off-Street Parking Requirements The off-street parking requirements for similar uses in the City were used to inform the proposed minimum parking requirements for distilleries and cocktail rooms. There are no parking maximum requirements proposed, so business owners could provide more parking if desired. A distillery has parking needs similar to those of a manufacturing facility, which under the City's zoning ordinance requires 1 space per 500 square feet of floor area. Staff recommends using this requirement for distilleries and micro-distilleries. Most micro-distilleries employ five to ten people for the distilling work. If a micro-distillery were 4,000 square feet, a minimum of 8 parking spaces would be required. If a distillery were 20,000 square feet, 40 parking spaces would be required. A cocktail room would require parking similar to that required of Class III Restaurants, which is 1 space per 60 square feet plus 1 space per 25 square feet of bar area. Staff recommends this minimum parking requirement for the cocktail room portion of a distillery. Liquor Licensing A separate liquor license from the City would be required for all of the above proposed uses after the distillery has obtained a license from the State of Minnesota. The City license requirements would address the hours of operation, outdoor patios, entertainment, capacity by gallons per year, bottling standards, conduct on the premises, violations, fees, and special events. The City Clerk is currently leading the work to draft recommendations to amend Chapter 5 of the City Code to provide for these new kinds of licenses. Those recommendations are tentatively scheduled for consideration by City Council in July and August. Summary of Recommendation Staff recommends amending sections 11.03, 11.35, 11.36, 11.47, and 11.70 of the Zoning Code to allow for distilleries and cocktail rooms. Attachments Underlined/Overstruck Version of Section 11.03: Definitions (3 pages) Underlined/Overstruck Version of Section 11.35: Light Industrial Zoning District (4 pages) Underlined/Overstruck Version of Section 11.36: Industrial Zoning District (2 pages) Underlined/Overstruck Version of Section 11.47: Mixed Use Zoning District (2 pages) Underlined/Overstruck Version of Section 11.70: Off-Street Parking and Loading Regulations (1 page) Minutes of the Golden Valley Planning Commission June 8, 2015 Page 5 Kluchka asked where the residential r uirements are articulated. Goellner stated that mobile food vendors won't be allowed residential zoning districts. Kluchka noted that theand Recreation policy talks bout neighborhood groups. Waldhauser clarified that the nei boXhood group languag ' in the park policy is referrob vents held in a park. Baker said it ig portant that t two policies be recondlled. Waldhauser asked about caterin a rivate°party in a residential area. Cera stated that catering trucks would not be cons*d mobile food vendors because mobile food vendors serve food to the publld:"KI chkaas ed the Commissioners if they think mobile food vendors should bq,taltowed in r'sidential areas. The consensus of the Planning Commission was tQ,6 t allow mobil vendors in residential areas at this time. MOVED aker, seconded by S ,gelbaum and motion carne nimously to /reco endapproval of the propo ed Zoning Code amendment rega 'ng mobile food rs with the amendments dis ussed. 3. Informal Public Hearing — Zoning Code Text Amendment— Distilleries — Z000-101 Applicant: City of Golden Valley Purpose: To consider adding language in the Zoning Code regarding distilleries. Goellner stated that craft distilleries and cocktail rooms are a growing trend and many communities are starting to allow them. She stated that staff is proposing language similar to the recently adopted brewery ordinance. She discussed the distilling process and the definitions of a distillery, a micro-distillery and a cocktail room. She referred to the state statutes regarding cocktail rooms and stated that there are limits of the amount of alcohol that can be served. The amount may not exceed .5 ounces per variety per person and no more than 1.5 ounces may be samples by any person on any day. Goellner stated that staff is proposing that distilleries be a permitted use in the Industrial zoning district only and that micro-distilleries be a permitted use in the Light Industrial and Industrial zoning districts, and a conditional use in the Mixed-Use zoning district. She stated that staff is also proposing that cocktail rooms smaller than 50% of the floor area be permitted uses in the Light Industrial and Industrial zoning districts and conditional uses in the Mixed-Use zoning district. Cocktail rooms that are larger than 50% of the floor area would be conditional uses in the Light Industrial, Industrial, and Mixed-Use zoning districts. She added that a cocktail room would require parking similar to that of a Class III restaurant so staff is recommending 1 space per 60 square feet plus 1 space per 25 square feet of bar area. Waldhauser questioned why micro-distilleries would be allowed in the Mixed-Use zoning district at all. Goellner said she thinks they could be a good economic development tool. Minutes of the Golden Valley Planning Commission June 8, 2015 Page 6 Baker stated that brewpubs and taprooms don't limit consumption and questioned why consumption is limited for craft distilleries and cocktail rooms. Goellner said she is not sure why the state limits consumption. Blum referred to the state statute and said the way he reads it is that the amount of consumption is limited if there is just a micro-distillery without a cocktail room, but if there is a cocktail room the amount is not limited. Segelbaum said he believes there are also requirements about micro-distilleries selling bottles of liquor. Goellner agreed and explained the on-sale and off-sale rules. She clarified that Blum was correct in that there are no consumption limits for cocktail rooms in state statute. Segelbaum referred to the proposed definition of cocktail room and stated that "micro- distillery" should be added to the definition as well. Baker stated that everywhere in the ordinance where the word distillery is used, the word micro-distillery should be added. Goellner said she would have the City Attorney review the proposed ordinance before it goes to the City Council. Segelbaum asked Goellner if she has a sense of the size of a distillery and a micro- distillery. Goellner said staff used the same language in regard to the size of a cocktail room that was used in the brewery/taproom ordinance language. Cera opened the public hearing. Seeing and hearing no one wishing to comment, Cera closed the public hearing. Blum said they may never come up with a perfect number regarding the size of the cocktail room but he wants to encourage investment in Golden Valley and make it easier for business to invest in this type of facility. Johnson stated that there are a lot of things that go into a cocktail that aren't distilled spirits and that is where the competition will come in. Baker said micro-distilleries would only able to sell what they produce so they wouldn't be able to sell mixed cocktails with alcohol products they don't make. Goellner clarified that the state statute is what limits what distilleries are allowed to sell. Blum stated that since the proposed ordinance will incorporate the state statute by reference the City doesn't need to have the conversation about what distilleries are allowed to sell. Baker referred to the uses that are permitted versus the ones that are conditional and questioned why all the uses couldn't be conditional, then the language regarding 50% of the floor space being used for a cocktail room wouldn't need to be in the ordinance at all because it could be added as a condition of approval. Blum agreed and asked about the rationale of limiting the floor space of a cocktail room. Goellner stated that if there were a really large distillery it could be more impactful on an area. Blum referred to proposed definition number 21.5 (cocktail room) and suggested that the language regarding state statute also be added to the end of definition number 31.5 (distillery). Minutes of the Golden Valley Planning Commission June 8, 2015 Page 7 Baker asked if the proper metric to determine parking is floor space as proposed, or if it should be based on seating. Goellner said it is easier to measure the floor area. She stated that if 1 space per 60 square feet of floor area isn't enough, or is too much, the code language could be amended in the future. MOVED by Waldhauser, seconded by Segelbaum and motion carried unanimously to recommend approval of the proposed Zoning Code amendment regarding distilleries and cocktail rooms with the amendments discussed. --Short Recess-- 4\5. Other Reports on Meetings of the Hou 'ng and Redevelopment Authority, City , Board of Zoning Appeal and other Meetings on the final Bottineau stati, n area planning open house held on June 4 Community Center. Goelln''er stated that staff will be bringing the station e Commission for review soon. usiness �Y Council Liaison Report Council MemberSchmidgall gave the dommission an update on some of the current projects in the City and thanked them fdr their work. Baker asked for an update on the'Comprehensive Plan process. Goellner stated that staff is starting to do the scope of"wor y. i 6. Adjournment The meeting was adjourned at 9:07 p,tn. , 'may R u John Kluchka, Secretary Lisa Wittman, Administrate. Assistant Definitions §11.03 15. Business: Any occupation, employment or enterprise wherein merchandise is exhibited or sold, or which occupies time, attention, labor and materials, or where services are offered for compensation. 16. Car Wash: A building and/or premises used principally for washing and cleaning automobiles, using either manual or automatic production line methods. 17. Cemetery: Land used or intended to be used for the burial of human dead and dedicated as a "cemetery" for such purposes. Source: Ordinance No. 585 Effective Date: 1-14-83 18. Child Care Facilities: A service provided to the public in which children of school or pre-school age are cared for during established business hours. Source: Ordinance No. 712 Effective Date: 6-23-88 19. Church or Synagogue: The term includes the following: church, synagogue, rectory, parish house or similar building incidental to the principal use which is maintained and operated by an organized group for religious purposes. 20. Clinic: A place used for the care, diagnosis and treatment of sick, ailing, infirm and injured persons and those who are in need of medical or surgical attention, but who are not provided with board or room, nor kept overnight on the premises. 21. Club: A non-profit association of persons who are bona fide members, paying regular dues, and are organized for some common purpose, but not including a group organized solely or primarily to render a service customarily carried on as a commercial enterprise. 21.5 Cocktail Room: A facility accessory to a micro-distillery that is licensed by the City for the on-sale consumption of distilled spirits produced by the distiller pursuant to Minnesota Statutes, Section 340A.22. 22. Congregate Housing: Housing for the elderly and/or handicapped, providing at least one (1) prepared meal per day in a common dining room, and may also provide certain medical and social services over and above what might be in a standard elderly apartment complex. 23. Condominium: A form of individual ownership within a multi-family building, or office/business building, which entails joint responsibility for maintenance and repairs. 24. Convalescent Home (Extended Care): Any building or group of buildings providing personal assistance or nursing care for those dependent upon the services by reason of age or physical or mental impairment but not for the Definitions §11.03 treatment of contagious diseases, addicts or mental illness, usually of a temporary duration. 25. Convenience Food Establishment: A place where food items (groceries, meats, etc.), beverages, and other retail items are sold along with hot or cold foods in or on disposable containers in individual servings for consumption on or off the premises. Such establishments do not include video games. 26. Cooperative (Housing): A multiple family dwelling owned and maintained by the residents. The entire structure and real property is under common ownership as contrasted to a condominium dwelling where individual units are under separate individual ownership. 27. Court: A space, open and unobstructed to the sky, located at, above or below grade level on a lot and bounded on three (3) or more sides by walls of a building. 28. Day Care — Home: A family dwelling in which foster care, supervision and/or training for children, out of their own home, who are of school or pre-school age is provided during part of a day (less than 24 hours) with no overnight accommodations or facilities, and children are delivered and removed daily. The number to be cared for in one (1) day care home shall not exceed ten (10) children, including the family's own children (in accordance with M.S. 245.812 and M.S. 462.357 and all acts amendatory thereof). Source: Ordinance No. 585 Effective Date: 1-14-83 29. Day Care — Nursery: A service provided to the public in which more than ten (10) children of school or pre-school age are cared for during established business hours. No overnight facilities are provided. The children are delivered and removed daily. Source: Ordinance No. 609 Effective Date: 11-1-83 30. Deck: An exterior floor system that exceeds twenty-five (25) square feet in floor area, has no roof structure, and is a minimum of eight (8) inches above grade at any point around its perimeter. Source: Ordinance No. 429, 2nd Series Effective Date: 2-19-10 31. Display Window: A window at street level, typically part of a storefront facade, used to display merchandise. Source: Ordinance No. 397, 2nd Series Effective Date: 6-6-08 31.5 Distillery: An establishment licensed by the State of Minnesota for the manufacture of distilled spirits in total quantity exceeding forty thousand (40,000) proof gallons in a calendar year. Definitions §11.03 75.5 Micro-Distillery: An establishment licensed by the State of Minnesota for the manufacture of distilled spirits in total quantity not to exceed forty thousand (40,000) proof gallons in a calendar year. 76. Motel: A series of sleeping or living units for the lodging of transient guests, offered to the public for compensation, and with convenient access to off- street parking spaces for the exclusive use of the guests or occupants. 77. Non-Conforming Building or Structure: Any building or structure lawfully occupied by a use, or lawfully established on the effective date of this Section, or amendments thereto, which does not conform with the regulations of this Chapter. 78. Non-Conforming Use: A land use or premises legally existing and/or in use on the effective date of this Section, or amendments thereto, which does not comply with the use provisions of this Chapter for the district in which the land use or premises is located. Source: Ordinance No. 585 Effective Date: 1-14-83 79. Non-Public Areas: Ancillary areas: back rooms, service areas, storage, kitchen, washrooms, etc. Source: Ordinance No. 615 Effective Date: 5-25-84 80. Nursing Home (Rest Home): A building having accommodations where care is provided for two (2) or more invalid, infirmed, aged convalescent or physically disabled persons that are not of the immediate family; but not including hospitals, clinics, sanitariums, or similar institutions. 81. Open Sales Lots: Any land used or occupied for the purpose of buying and selling new or second-hand passenger cars and/or trucks, motor scooters, motorcycles, boats, trailers, aircraft and monuments and for the storing of same prior to sale. 82. Out-Patient Surgical Facility: A place, other than a hospital or clinic, where minor surgery is performed on humans by qualified surgeons on an out- patient basis, and not requiring a patient to stay overnight in such facility. Source: Ordinance No. 585 Effective Date: 1-14-83 83. Park: An open space with natural vegetation and landscaping, which may include recreational facilities, designed to serve the recreation needs of the residents of the community. Source: Ordinance No. 397, 2nd Series Effective Date: 6-6-08 84. Parking Lot: definition deleted. Light Industrial Zoning District § 11.35 Section 11.35: Light Industrial Zoning District Subdivision 1. Purpose The purpose of the Light Industrial Zoning District is to provide for the establishment of warehousing, offices and light industrial developments. Subdivision 2. District Established Properties shall be established within the Light Industrial Zoning District in the manner provided for in Section 11.90, Subdivision 3 of this Chapter, and when thus established shall be incorporated in this Section 11.35, Subdivision 2 by an ordinance which makes cross-reference to this Section 11.35 and which shall become a part hereof and of Section 11.10, Subdivision 2 thereof, as fully as if set forth herein. In addition the Light Industrial Zoning Districts thus established, and/or any subsequent changes to the same which shall be made and established in a similar manner, shall be reflected in the official zoning map of the City as provided in Section 11.11 of this Chapter. Subdivision 3. Permitted Uses The following uses and no others shall be considered permitted uses within the Light Industrial Zoning District: A. Offices B. Warehouses C. Wholesale-Retail distribution centers D. Electronics manufacturing E. Food packaging and processing; provided, however, that no processing shall involve any cooking, heating, smoking, soaking or marinating procedures Source: Ordinance No. 546 Effective Date: 9-18-81 F. Assembly and/or fabricating exclusive of sheet metal or steel fabricating, foundries and similar uses except for the fabricating of sheet metal as it is used for the heating, ventilation and air conditioning business (which types of sheet metal fabricating shall be permitted uses Source: Ordinance No. 674 Effective Date: 12-27-85 G. Other light manufacturing uses that would not constitute a nuisance or health hazard to surrounding or adjacent residential or commercial districts Light Industrial Zoning District § 11.35 H. Essential Services - Class I and Class III Source: Ordinance No. 271, 2nd Series Effective Date: 11-15-02 I. Temporary Retail Sales in accordance with this Section Source: Ordinance No. 536, 2nd Series Effective Date: 1-16-15 J. Sexually Oriented Businesses Source: Ordinance No. 326, 2nd Series Effective Date: 4-15-05 K. Breweries. Limited and associated retail use such as merchandise related to the Brewery may be sold. L. Taprooms, that occupy up to fifty percent (50%) of the gross floor area of the Brewery. Limited and associated retail use such as merchandise related to the Brewery may be sold in the taproom. Source: Ordinance No. 540, 2nd Series Effective Date: 1-30-15 *Renumbering Source (G-K): Ordinance 536, 2nd Series Effective Date: 1-6-15 M. Micro-Distilleries. Limited and associated retail use such as merchandise related to the Micro-Distillery may be sold. N. Cocktail Rooms, that occupy up to fifty percent (50%) of the gross floor area of the Micro-Distillery. Limited and associated retail use such as merchandise related to the Micro-Distillery may be sold in the Cocktail Room. Subdivision 4. Conditional Uses The following uses may be allowed as Conditional Uses after review by the Planning Commission and approval by the Council following the standards and procedures set forth in this Chapter: A. Building materials yard (including inside and outside storage) B. Public garages for repairing and storing motor vehicles C. Laundries and dry-cleaning plants D. Animal hospital where domestic animals are received for treatment, care and cure by a duly licensed veterinary physician and surgeon in the customary and ordinary pursuit of his profession E. Ball fields and other recreation facilities Light Industrial Zoning District § 11.35 F. Research and development laboratories and pilot plant operations incidental thereto G. Greenhouses with no outside storage, including an outside growing area no larger than the greenhouse building area. Retail sales may be permitted only where located inside and incidental to a wholesale business. H. Packaging and/or bottling of soft drinks or dairy products I. Bakeries (commercial-wholesale) 3. Day care facilities provided that said facilities serve only dependents of persons employed on the same premises as are otherwise permitted by this Chapter Source: Ordinance No. 546 Effective Date: 9-18-81 K. Health, fitness and/or exercise facilities, including dance studio, gymnastic training, weight lifting studio, aerobic exercise and gymnasiums Source: Ordinance No. 573 Effective Date: 8-27-82 L. Heliports, as herein defined Source: Ordinance No. 643 Effective Date: 11-16-84 M. Food packaging and processing that involves cooking, heating, smoking, soaking or marinating procedures Source: Ordinance No. 664 Effective Date: 7-12-85 N. Child Care Facilities, as defined in this Chapter Source: Ordinance No. 712 Effective Date: 6-23-88 O. Truck/Van Terminals Source: Ordinance No. 50, 2nd Series Effective Date: 11-21-90 P. Medical clinics Source: Ordinance No. 82, 2nd Series Effective Date: 2-27-92 Q. Trade Schools or Training Centers Source: Ordinance No. 252, 2nd Series Effective Date: 7-26-01 R. Adult Day Care Center Source: Ordinance No. 264, 2nd Series Effective Date: 12-13-01 Light Industrial Zoning District § 11.35 S. Drive-in bank facilities with frontage on a collector or minor arterial street Source: Ordinance No. 274, 2nd Series Effective Date: 12-27-02 T. Accessory retail services and/or sales incidental to a permitted use, conducted in an area less than ten percent (10%) of the building's footprint Source: Ordinance No. 283, 2nd Series Effective Date: 9-12-03 U. Recycling Drop-Off Facilities V. Recycling Facilities Source: Ordinance No. 536, 2nd Series Effective Date: 1-16-15 W. Taprooms that occupy fifty percent (50%) or more of the gross floor area of the Brewery. Limited and associated retail use such as merchandise related to the Brewery may be sold in the taproom. Source: Ordinance No. 540, 2nd Series Effective Date: 1-30-15 X. Cocktail Rooms that occupy fifty percent (50%) or more of the gross floor area of the Micro-Distillery. Limited and associated retail use such as merchandise related to the Micro-Distillery may be sold in the Cocktail Room. Subdivision S. Prohibited Uses No building, structure, or land shall be used, and no building or structure shall be erected, altered or enlarged which is intended or designed, for any of the following uses: A. Residential dwellings B. Hotels, motels, rooming houses, or tourist homes C. Institutional uses Source: Ordinance No. 546 Effective Date: 9-18-81 D. Except as provided herein, retail commercial uses, such as shopping centers Source: Ordinance No. 326, 2nd Series Effective Date: 4-15-05 Industrial Zoning District § 11.36 Section 11.36: Industrial Zoning District Subdivision 1. Purpose The purpose of the Industrial Zoning District is to provide for the establishment of industrial and manufacturing development and uses along with directly related and complementary uses which, because of the nature of the product or character of activity, requires isolation from residential and commercial areas. Subdivision 2. District Established Properties shall be established within the Industrial Zoning District in the manner provided for in Section 11.90, Subdivision 3 of this Chapter, and when thus established shall be incorporated in this Section 11.36, Subdivision 2 by an ordinance which makes cross-reference to this Section 11.36 and which shall become a part hereof and of Section 11.10, Subdivision 2 thereof, as fully as if set forth herein. In addition the Industrial Zoning Districts thus established, and/or any subsequent changes to the same which shall be made and established in a similar manner, shall be reflected in the official zoning map of the City as provided in Section 11.11 of this Chapter. Subdivision 3. Permitted Uses The following uses are permitted in the Industrial Zoning District: A. All uses permitted in the Light Industrial Zoning District B. Lumber yard, including outside storage C. Building materials yard, including outside storage D. Battery and tire service E. Blacksmith, repair, machine shop, or tin shop F. Animal kennels where animals are customarily kept, boarded, cared for, trained, or fed, or bought and sold, as a business G. General manufacturing uses, including the compounding, assembly or treatment of articles or materials H. Hotels and motor hotels I. Class I restaurants J. Metal fabrication and assembly Source: Ordinance No. 551 Effective Date: 9-11-81 Industrial Zoning District § 11.36 K. Temporary Retail Sales in accordance with Subdivision 11 of this section. Source: Ordinance No. 79, 2nd Series Effective Date: 10-10-91 L. Sexually Oriented Businesses. Source: Ordinance No. 326, 2nd Series Effective Date: 4-15-05 M. Recycling Drop-Off Facilities. Source: Ordinance No. 536, 2nd Series Effective Date: 1-16-15 N. Distilleries. Subdivision 4. Conditional Uses The following conditional uses may be allowed after review by the Planning Commission and approval by the Council following the standards and procedures set forth in this Chapter: A. All conditional uses as provided for in the Light Industrial Zoning District B. Car wash C. Structures and premises for automobile, or other motor vehicle sales and showrooms, with incidental accessory service and repair facilities D. Gasoline service stations E. Bulk storage of gas, fuel oil, chemicals, and other liquid or solid materials which may be considered hazardous or toxic F. Mortuaries G. Off-street parking lots for adjacent Commercial or Industrial uses H. Outdoor sales including motor vehicle and equipment rental I. Drive-in retail establishments, such as banks, cleaners, photo shops, restaurants (Class II), and similar uses J. Unattended business operations, such as vending machines and equipment K. Temporary structures such as tents or air-supported structures L. Railroad yards, railroad tracks and rights-of-way in such yards, railroad shops, round houses, and any other use which shall be for railroads I-394 Mixed Use Zoning District § 11.47 C. All permitted uses in the Commercial Zoning District, provided that such uses are combined with other permitted or conditional uses within a mixed-use building, and that the gross floor area occupied by any such single use shall not exceed ten thousand (10,000) square feet. D. Class I and III Restaurants E. Business and professional offices, provided that the gross floor area occupied by the use(s) on any lot shall not exceed ten thousand (10,000) square feet. F. Medical clinics G. Live-work units H. All uses permitted in the Institutional Zoning Districts, I-1 through I-3 I. Child Care Facilities J. Adult Day Care Centers K. Structured parking accessory to any permitted use Source: Ordinance No. 397, 2nd Series Effective Date: 6-6-08 L. Brewpubs Source: Ordinance No. 540, 2nd Series Effective Date: 1-30-15 Subdivision 4. Conditional Uses A. Class II Restaurants B. Any permitted use in the Commercial zoning district in a free-standing building. C. Any permitted or conditional use allowed in the Commercial zoning district occupying more than ten thousand (10,000) square feet of gross floor area. D. Business and professional offices occupying more than ten thousand (10,000) square feet on any zoning lot. The City Council may establish a maximum amount of office development that will be permitted on any zoning lot, based upon traffic studies as required by the I-394 Overlay Zoning District, using appropriate minimum Levels of Service. E. Research and development laboratories F. Convenience stores, including the sale of gasoline. G. Drive-in or drive-through facilities accessory to any permitted or conditional use. I-394 Mixed Use Zoning District § 11.47 H. Buildings exceeding the height limits specified in Subdivision 6(D). Source: Ordinance No. 397, 2nd Series Effective Date: 6-6-08 I. Breweries. Limited and associated retail use such as merchandise related to the Brewery may be sold. J. Taprooms. Limited and associated retail use such as merchandise related to the Brewery may be sold in the taproom. Source: Ordinance No. 540, 2nd Series Effective Date: 1-30-15 K. Micro-Distilleries. Limited and associated retail use such as merchandise related to the Micro-Distillery may be sold. L. Cocktail Rooms. Limited and associated retail use such as merchandise related to the Micro-Distillery may be sold in the Cocktail Room. Subdivision 5. Standards for Live-Work Units The purpose of a live-work unit is to provide a transitional use type between a home occupation and commercial enterprise. A. The work space may be located on any floor of the building, but businesses serving the public shall generally be located on the first floor for accessibility. Office or studio spaces or other low-traffic activities may be located on upper floors or basements. B. The dwelling unit component shall maintain a separate entrance located on the front or side facade and accessible from the primary abutting public street. C. A total of two (2) off-street parking spaces shall be provided for a live-work unit, located to the rear of the unit, or in an underground or enclosed space. D. The business component of the building may include offices, small service establishments, home crafts which are typically considered accessory to a dwelling unit, or limited retailing associated with fine arts, crafts, or personal services. It may not include a commercial food service requiring a license, a limousine business or auto service or repair for any vehicles other than those registered to residents of the property. E. The business of the live-work unit must be conducted by a person who resides in the dwelling unit. The business shall not employ more than two (2) workers on-site at any one time who live outside of the live-work unit. Off-Street Parking and Loading Regulations § 11.70 INDUSTRIAL Manufacturing - Fabricating 1 space er 500 s.f. of gross floor area Outdoor Storage 1 space er 20,000 s.f. of storage area Post Office/Parcel Distribution 10 spaces plus 1 per 500 s.f. plus 1 for each vehicle on site. Self Storage Facility 1 space for every 10,000 s.f. of storage area Sales Showroom (Motor Vehicles, machinery, 1 space for every 1000 s.f. of gross floor boats, etc.) area of display area plus 1 space for every 5,000 gross s.f. of outside display 1 space for every 400 s.f. gross floor Showrooms Other (e.g. furniture, appliances)area of show room, plus 1 space for every 5,000 gross square feet of outside dis la area. Warehouses and Storage 1 space for every 3,000 s.f. of gross floor area. Truck/Van Terminals 1 space per 3,000 s. f. of gross floor area. Outside areas 1 space per 2,000 s.f. of Lumber Yards or Bldg. Material Yards material display Source: Ordinance 346, 2nd Series Effective Date: 7-1-06 Brewpub 1 space per 60 s.f. of floor area plus 1 space per 25 s.f. of bar area. Brewery 1 space per 500 s.f. of floor area 1 space per 60 s.f. of floor area. For every 2 bicycle spaces provided, 1 car space may be reduced from minimum Taproom parking requirement, for no more than 15% of the required spaces. Source: Ordinance No. 540, 2nd Series Effective Date: 1-30-15 Distillery 1 space per 500 s.f. of floor area Micro-Distillery 1 space per 500 s.f, of floor area 1 space per 60 s.f. of floor area. For every 2 bicycle spaces provided, 1 car Cocktail Room space may be reduced from minimum parking requirement, for no more than 15% of the required spaces. Golden Valley City Code Page 1 of 1 ORDINANCE NO. 567, 2ND SERIES AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE CITY CODE Amending Chapter 11: Land Use Regulation (Zoning) Regarding Cocktail Rooms, Distilleries and Micro-Distilleries The City Council for the City of Golden Valley hereby ordains as follows: Section 1. City Code Section 11.03 is amended by adding definitions 21.5, 31.5, and 75.5 as follows: 21.5 Cocktail Room: A facility accessory to a micro-distillery that is licensed by the City for the on-sale consumption of distilled spirits produced by the distiller pursuant to Minnesota Statutes, Section 340A.22. 31.5 Distillery: An establishment licensed by the State of Minnesota for the manufacture of distilled spirits in total quantity exceeding forty thousand (40,000) proof gallons in a calendar year. 75.5 Micro-Distillery: An establishment licensed by the State of Minnesota for the manufacture of distilled spirits in total quantity not to exceed forty thousand (40,000) proof gallons in a calendar year. Section 2. City Code Section 11.35, Subdivision 3 is amended by adding the following permitted uses: M. Micro-Distilleries. Limited and associated retail use such as merchandise related to the Micro-Distillery may be sold. N. Cocktail Rooms, that occupy up to fifty percent (50%) of the gross floor area of the Micro-Distillery. Limited and associated retail use such as merchandise related to the Micro-Distillery may be sold in the Cocktail Room. Section 3. City Code Section 11.35, Subdivision 4 is amended by adding the following conditional use: X. Cocktail Rooms, that occupy fifty percent (50%) or more of the gross floor area of the Micro-Distillery. Limited and associated retail use such as merchandise related to the Micro-Distillery may be sold in the Cocktail Room. Section 4. City Code Section 11.36, Subdivision 3 is amended by adding the following permitted uses: N. Distilleries Section 5. City Code Section 11.47, Subdivision 4 is amended by adding the following conditional uses: K. Micro-Distilleries. Limited and associated retail use such as merchandise related to the Micro-Distillery may be sold. Ordinance No. 567 - continued L. Cocktail Rooms. Limited and associated retail use such as merchandise related to the Micro-Distillery may be sold in the Cocktail Room. Section 6. City Code Section 11.70, Subdivision 3 is amended by adding the following parking requirements under the Industrial section: Distillery 1 space per 500 s.f. of floor area Micro-Distillery 1 space per 500 s.f. of floor area 1 space per 60 s.f. of floor area. For every 2 bicycle spaces provided, 1 car space Cocktail Room may be reduced from minimum parking requirement, for no more than 15% of the re uired spaces. Section 7. City Code Chapter 1 entitled "General Provisions and Definitions Applicable to the Entire City Code Including Penalty for Violation" and Section 11.99 entitled "Violation a Misdemeanor" are hereby adopted in their entirety, by reference, as though repeated verbatim herein. Section 8. This Ordinance shall take effect from and after its passage and publication as required by law. Adopted by the City Council this 21St day of July, 2015. /s/Shepard M. Harris Shepard M. Harris, Mayor ATTEST: /s/Kristine A. Luedke Kristine A. Luedke, City Clerk Ct�� U� ���. � ;a �� � 3 � : ,. �� Physical Development Department 763-593-8095/763-593-8109(fax) Executive Summary For Action Golden Valley City Council Meeting July 21, 2015 Agenda Item 4. B. Continued Public Hearing- Ordinance #562 -Amending Section 11.04 Temporary Uses regarding Mobile Food Vendors Prepared By Emily Goellner, Associate Planner/Grant Writer Updated Recommendations This public hearing was continued from the City Council meeting on July 7, 2015. Planning staff has incorporated feedback from City Council in the following ways: Distance from Restaurants The distance of 200 feet between restaurants and potential mobile food vendors was further investigated and staff has determined that 200 feet will not significantly limit the available space for mobile food vendors, particularly for Golden Valley Days at City Hall. The distance is measured from the entrance of the restaurant or the outdoor seating area, whichever is closer to the proposed location of the mobile food vendor. Mobile food vendors would be allowed within 200 feet of a restaurant if written permission is provided by the restaurant owner in the application. This distance requirement would not apply to the distance between a mobile food vendor and other mobile food vendors. Fees Fees were compared among other cities in the region (see attachment). From this comparison, staff is recommending a fee of$40/day for up to 3 days. Those interested in a seasonal permit for up to 120 days would pay a $150 fee. Staff is not recommending a seasonal option for City Parks because Parks and Recreation staff view mobile food vendors as appropriate for only special events. A 7-day was proposed by staff at the previous City Council meeting, but staff has extended this option to a seasonal permit of 120 days in order to reduce fees to mobile food vendors and to reduce administrative responsibilities for City staff and mobile food vendors. The fee schedule is not approved with this ordinance. The proposed fees must be approved under a separate ordinance, which is under second consideration at the luly 21 City Council meeting. Other Mobile Vendors Excluded In order to ensure that ice cream trucks and hot dog stands will not be required to obtain the Mobile Food Vendor permit from the City, staff has updated the proposed code language to clarify that mobile food vendors are self-contained vehicles or trailers used to prepare and serve food that is readily movable without dissembling. As highly processed foods, ice cream and hot dogs are prepared in a facility separate from the vehicle or trailer that serves them. Any inquiries from ice cream trucks or hot dog stand operators will be directed to Hennepin County Environmental Health by City staff. Attachments • Memo to City Council dated July 7, 2015 (4 pages) • Mobile Food Vendor Fee Comparison (1 page) • Memo to Planning Commission dated June 8, 2015 (3 pages) • Planning Commission Minutes dated June 8, 2015 (5 pages) • Underlined/Overstruck Version of Section 11.04: Temporary Uses (4 pages) • Parks and Recreation Department Mobile Food Vendor Permit Fact Sheet (2 pages) • Parks and Recreation Department Mobile Food Vendor Application (1 page) • Ordinance#562, amending Section 11.04 Temporary Uses regarding Mobile Food Vendors (3 pages) Recommended Action Motion to adopt Ordinance#562, Amending Section 11.04 Temporary Uses regarding Mobile Food Vendors. city af � �;�: C����'� � � � � �, � � � , �a„ �,,.'� Physical Development Department 763-593-8095/763-593-8109(fax) Executive Summary For Action Golden Valley City Council Meeting July 7, 2015 Agenda item 4. B. Public Hearing- Ordinance#562 -Amending Section 11.04 Temporary Uses regarding Mobile Food Vendors Prepared By Emily Goellner, Associate Planner/Grant Writer Background The City Council has recently adopted policy to allow breweries and taprooms to locate in various parts of the city. Since food cannot be served in a taproom according to state law,food trucks (more formally called mobile food vendors) have become a common partner for taprooms. The food vendors typically park in the taproom parking lot for a portion of the day or night. Mobile Food Vending has grown considerably in recent years. In Downtown Minneapolis, dozens of food trucks line up on Marquette Avenue to serve people on their lunch breaks. Mobile food vendors have also become a popular option for corporate events,festivals, farmers' markets, and wedding receptions. The City's Parks and Recreation Department currently issues permits to food vendors interested in locating in any of the city parks for a specific event. Staff recommends amending section 11.04 of the Zoning Code to allow mobile food vendors to be located temporarily in specified areas outside of City parks. Mobile Food Vendor Permits for Golden Valley Parks The Golden Valley Parks and Recreation Department began issuing permits to mobile food vendors in 2014. Five permits were issued in 2014 and one permit has been issued so far in 2015. With this permit,food vendors can be located in a city park for up to three consecutive days at a fee of$40 per day. So far, all of the permits have been issued for a one-day event. The most common events accommodating mobile food vendors have been corporate employee appreciation events in the summer. Potential Impacts First and foremost, mobile food vendors must be evaluated by Hennepin County or State of Minnesota for conformance with sanitation and food safety requirements. All applicants for a mobile food vending permit must provide a copy of the mobile food license received by Hennepin County or State of Minnesota and the license must be posted with the vendor's mobile operation. The vendor must provide trash receptacles for customer use and keep the site in a neat and orderly fashion,free from litter, refuse, debris,junk, or other waste which results in offensive odors or unsightly conditions. Since mobile vendors have the ability to move around the city easily,the exact location of the vending unit should be determined in the issuance of the permit. It is crucial that the mobile unit does not impede pedestrian or vehicular traffic by blocking streets, driveways, sidewalks, or necessary parking spaces. The unit should be located on an impervious surface. Staff recommends that the vendor be required to provide written permission from the property owner of the site in which the vendor would like to locate and the property must be located in a non-residential zoning district. A Zoning Permit for Mobile Food Vendors would be allowed in the following non-residential zoning districts: Commercial, Light Industrial, Industrial, Business and Professional Offices, I-394 Mixed Use, and Institutional. If the vendor would like to locate in a Golden Valley Park,the vendor would file an application with the Parks and Recreation Department. Some additional locational restrictions should be placed on mobile food vendors in order to reduce their impacts on the community. First, mobile food vendors should not be located within 1,000 feet of a school when the school is in session unless written permission is granted from the principal. Also, mobile food vendors should not be located within 200 feet of an eating establishment (with the exception of other mobile food vendors). Many brick-and-mortar restaurant owners have been concerned about the unfair locational advantage that mobile food vendors possess. A restriction in the distance between mobile food vendors and brick-and-mortar restaurants has been considered a reasonable solution in other Minnesota cities. These dimensional restrictions of 200 feet and 1,000 feet were analyzed by Planning staff and do not appear to significantly limit the available space for mobile food vendors in the City. Lastly, vendors would be granted a daily permit with no overnight parking permitted. Hours of operation would be limited to 8 am to 10 pm unless otherwise limited or extended by the City Manager or his/her designee. These are the hours of operations permitted by the Parks and Recreation department for mobile food vendors, which match the hours of operation for city parks. Staff predicts that taprooms will be the most common partner for mobile food vendors. Taprooms may apply for an intoxicating liquor license, which allows the taproom to be open until 2 am. Staff suggests that the City Manager be granted the ability to extend food vending hours to match taproom hours in order to ensure that those drinking alcohol have access to food. Zoning Permit for Mobile Food Vendors A Zoning Permit for Mobile Food Vendors would be similar to the Parks and Recreation Department permit in the following ways: • Permit costs $40/day • A permit can be granted for up to 7 consecutive days (currently, Parks and Recreation allows up to 3 consecutive days, but Parks and Recreation staff recommends allowing up to 7 days as shown in the proposed fee schedule) • Applicant may apply for a renewal of the license • Proof of Mobile Food License from the Hennepin County or State of Minnesota required • Liquor License is not included with the permit • Hours of operation limited to 8 am-10 pm unless otherwise limited or extended by City Manager or his/her designee • In order to locate on properties owned by the City, vendor must provide an insurance rider listing the City as an additional insured on the policy for the permitted dates of operation • Vendor responsible for trash removal, clean-up, and any damages generated by operation • Permits will be limited by area as determined by City Manager or his/her designee • Must park in a designated parking lot, must not impede traffic flow or pedestrian walkways, and cannot park on grass unless permitted by City Manager of his/her designee The Zoning Permit for Mobile Food Vendors would di er from the Parks and Recreation Department's permit in the following ways: • Zoning Permit is not eligible to vendors looking to locate in the Golden Valley Park system • Eligible locations are zoned and currently used for Non-Residential Uses including Commercial, Light Industrial, Industrial, Business and Professional Offices, I-394 Mixed Use, and Institutional (with the exception of City Parks) • Vendors may not be located 200 feet (at its closest point) from the entrance or from the outdoor seating area of another food-serving establishment (with the exception of other mobile food vendors that have received a permit) unless that establishment provides written permission with the vendor's application • Vendor cannot occupy parking spaces needed to meet the minimum parking requirement unless the property owner can demonstrate that the spaces are not needed during the vendor's hours of operation • Vendors may not be located within 1,000 feet of schools while they are in session unless written permission is granted by the school principal Mobile Medical Uses At this time, the proposed changes to the zoning code do not include language to allow mobile medical uses in the City for humans and pets. Mobile medical uses typically include services such as vaccinations, diagnostics, and bloodmobiles. These uses are offered in a mobile format in order to serve the less mobile residents of the community at a reduced cost. Staff will continue to conduct research on this topic. Attachments • Memo to Planning Commission dated June 8, 2015 (3 pages) • Planning Commission Minutes dated June 8, 2015 (4 pages) • Underlined/Overstruck Version of Section 11.04:Temporary Uses (4 pages) • Clean Version of Section 11.04:Temporary Uses (4 pages) • Parks and Recreation Department Mobile Food Vendor Permit Fact Sheet (2 pages) • Parks and Recreation Department Mobile Food Vendor Application (1 page) • Ordinance#562 - Amending Chapter 11: Land Use Regulations (Zoning) Regarding Mobile Food Vendors (3 pages) Recommended Action Motion to adopt Ordinance#562, Amending Section 11.04 Temporary Uses regarding Mobile Food Vendors. Cl f 1' (3� ,,,�-_�:,y � , . �� ,� � �1���'�1 � � � � �� � � 1 � �1 Ph sical Develo ment De artment ��. �',� Y p P 763-593-8095/763-593-8109(fax) Date: July 21, 2015 To: Golden Valley City Council From: Emily Goellner, Associate Planner/Grant Writer Subject: Mobile Food Vendor Fee Comparison City Fee $818/year (includes health inspection fees) Minneapolis $126 new license surcharge $87-232 per special event Minnetonka $480/year (includes health inspection fees) Edina $120 for special events up to 3 days Bloomington $160 for special events up to 3 days $275 for an event lasting 4-21 days St. Louis Park $50/year Brooklyn Park $150/year St. Paul No fee established; Mobile Food Vending not formalized by City Hopkins No fee established; Mobile Food Vending not formalized by City Roseville No fee established; Mobile Food Vending not formalized by City Robbinsdale No fee established; Mobile Food Vending not formalized by City Brooklyn Center No fee established; Mobile Food Vending not formalized by City Richfield No fee established; Mobile Food Vending not formalized by City cr f v o�� , �:�� � � 1 �rden ���l Ph sica De . �'� y 1 velopment Departinent 763-593-8095/763-593-8109(fax) Date: June 8, 2015 To: Golden Valley Planning Commission From: Emily Goellner, Associate Planner/Grant Writer Subject: Zoning Code Text Amendment—Mobile Food Vendors Background The City Council has recently adopted policy to allow breweries and taprooms to locate in various parts of the city. Since food cannot be served in a taproom according to state law, food trucks (more formally called mobile food vendors) have become a common partner for taprooms. The food vendors typically park in the taproom parking lot for a portion of the day or night. Mobile Food Vending has grown considerably in recent years. In Downtown Minneapolis, dozens of food trucks line up on Marquette Avenue to serve people on their lunch breaks. Mobile food vendors have also become a popular option for corporate events, festivals, farmers' markets, and wedding receptions. The City's Parks and Recreation Department currently issues permits to food vendors interested in locating in any of the city parks for a specific event. Staff recommends amending section 11.04 of the Zoning Code to allow mobile food vendors to be located temporarily in specified areas outside of City parks. Mobile Food Vendor Permits for Golden Valley Parks The Golden Valley Parks and Recreation Department began issuing permits to mobile food vendors in 2014. Five permits were issued in 2014 and one permit has been issued so far in 2015. With this permit, food vendors can be located in a city park for up to three consecutive days. Each day requires a separate $40 permit. So far, all of the permits have been issued for a one-day event. The most common events accommodating mobile food vendors have been corporate employee appreciation events in the summer. Potential Impacts First and foremost, mobile food vendors must be evaluated by Hennepin County or State of Minnesota for conformance with sanitation and food safety requirements. All applicants for a mobile food vending permit must provide a copy of the mobile food license received by Hennepin County or State of Minnesota and the license must be posted with the vendor's mobile operation. The vendor must provide trash receptacles for customer use and keep the site in a neat and orderly fashion, free from litter, refuse, debris,junk, or other waste which results in offensive odors or unsightly conditions. Since mobile vendors have the ability to move around the city easily, the exact location of the vending unit should be determined in the issuance of the permit. It is crucial that the mobile unit does not impede pedestrian or vehicular traffic by blocking streets, driveways, sidewalks, or necessary parking spaces. The unit should be located on an impervious surface. Staff recommends that the vendor be required to provide written permission from the property owner of the site in which the vendor would like to locate and th� property must be located in a non-residential zoning district. A Zoning Permit for Mobile Food Vendors would be allowed in the following zoning districts: Commercial, Light Industrial, Industrial, Business and Professional Offices, I-394 Mixed Use, and Institutional. If the vendor would like to locate in a Golden Valley Park, the vendor would file an application with the Parks and Recreation Department. Some additional locational restrictions should be placed on mobile food vendors in order to reduce their impacts on the community. First, mobile food vendors should not be located within 1,000 feet of a school when the school is in session unless written permission is granted from the superintendent. Also, mobile food vendors should not be located within 100 feet of an eating establishment (with the exception of other mobile food vendors). Many brick-and-mortar restaurant owners have been concerned about the unfair locational advantage that mobile food vendors possess. A restriction in the distance between mobile food vendors and brick-and-mortar restaurants has been considered a reasonable solution in other Minnesota cities. These dimensional restrictions of 100 feet and 1,000 feet were analyzed by Planning staff and do not appear to significantly limit the available space for mobile food vendors in the City. Lastly, vendors would be granted a daily permit with no overnight parking permitted. Hours of operation would be limited to 8 am to 10 pm unless otherwise limited or extended by the City Manager or his/her designee. These are the hours of operations permitted by the Parks and Recreation department for mobile food vendors, which match the hours of operation for city parks. Staff predicts that taprooms will be the most common partner for mobile food vendors. Taprooms may apply for an intoxicating liquor license, which allows the taproom to be open until 2 am. Staff suggests that the City Manager be granted the ability to extend food vending hours to match taproom hours in order to ensure that those drinking alcohol have access to food. Zoning Permit for Mobile Food Vendors A Zoning Permit for Mobile Food Vendors would be similarto the Parks and Recreation Department permit in the following ways: • Permit is granted on a per-day basis and costs $40/day • A permit can be granted for up to 3 consecutive days • Proof of Mobile Food License from the Hennepin County or State of Minnesota required • Liquor License is not included with the permit • Hours of operation limited to 8 am-10 pm • Must provide an insurance rider listing the property owner as an additional insured on the policy for the permitted dates of operation • Vendor responsible for trash removal, clean-up, and any damages generated by operation • Permits will be limited by area as determined by City Manager or his/her designee • Must park in a designated parking lot, must not impede traffic flow or pedestrian walkways, and cannot park on grass unless permitted by City Manager of his/her designee The Zoning Permit for Mobile Food Vendors would di er from the Parks and Recreation Department's permit in the following ways: • Zoning Permit is not eligible to vendors looking to locate in the Golden Valley Park system • Eligible locations are zoned and currently used for Commercial, Light Industrial, Industrial, Business and Professional Offices, I-394 Mixed Use, and Institutional (with the exception of City Parks) • Vendors may not be located 100 feet (at its closest point) from the entrance or from the outdoor seating area of another food-serving establishment (with the exception of other mobile food vendors that have received a permit) • Vendor cannot occupy parking spaces needed to meet the minimum parking requirement unless the property owner can demonstrate that the spaces are not needed during the vendor's hours of operation • Vendors may not be located within 1,000 feet of schools while they are in session unless written permission is granted by the school principal Mobile Medical Uses At this time, the proposed changes to the zoning code do not include language to allow mobile medical uses in the City for humans and pets. Mobile medical uses typically include services such as vaccinations, diagnostics, and bloodmobiles. These uses are offered in a mobile format in order to serve the less mobile residents of the community at a reduced cost. Staff will continue to conduct research on this topic. Recommendation Staff recommends amending section 11.04 of the Zoning Code to allow for mobile food vendors. Attachments Underlined/Overstruck Version of Section 11.04:Temporary Events and Uses (2 pages) Parks and Recreation Department Mobile Food Vendor Permit Fact Sheet (2 pages) Parks and Recreation Department Mobile Food Vendor Application (1 page) Regular Meeting of the Golden Valley Planning Commission June 8, 2015 A lar meeting of the Planning Comm' sion was held at the Golden Valley City Hall, Council bers, 7800 Golden Valley oad, Golden Valley, Minneso a, on Monday, June 8, 2015. ir Cera called the me � ing to order af 7 pm. Those present were Planni ommis �oners Bak , um, Cera, Johnson, Kluchka, Segelbaum, and Waldhauser. Als r ent ssociate Planner/Grant Writer Emily Goellner, and Administrative Assista ' W�an. 1. Approval of Min �� --� _.�,.^ May 27, , Regular Plann' g Commission Meeting MOV y Waldhauser, seconded y Segelbaum and motion carried unanimous to a ove the May 27, 2015, as subm tted. Commissioners Cera and Kluchka abstained. 2. Informal Public Hearing —Zoning Code Text Amendment— Mobile Food Vsnding —ZO00-100 Applicant: City of Golden Valley Purpose: To consider adding language in the Zoning Code regarding mobile food vending (food trucks). Goellner stated that food trucks are a growing trend in the Twin Cities and with the recently approved Zoning Code text amendments regarding breweries it is a good time to consider allowing mobile food vending as they are a common partner for taprooms. She stated that the City's Parks and Recreation Department currently issues permits to food vendors wishing to locate in the City's parks. She added that five permits were issued in 2014 and one permit has been issued so far in 2015. The permits cost $40 per day and are granted for a maximum of three days. She explained that staff is recommending the permits issued through the Planning Division would be for a maximum of seven days rather than the three days allowed by Parks and Recreation. Kluchka noted that the underlined/overstruck Zoning Code language in the agenda packet states that permits would be granted for a maximum of three days. Goellner said she would change the language to allow a maximum of seven days for the permits issues through the Planning department and keep the three day requirement for the Parks and Recreation permit. Goellner referred to the potential impact of mobile vendors and stated that staff is recommending the following: mobile food vendors must obtain a license either from Hennepin County or the State of Minnesota, the hours of operation are 8 am to 10 pm unless otherwise limited or extended by the City, the removal of trash is required, Minutes of the Golden Valley Planning Commission June 8, 2015 Page 2 mobile food vendors would only be allowed to park on an impervious surFace, no parking is allowed on sidewalks, driveways, or streets, no overnight parking is allowed, mobile food vendors are not allowed to use parking spaces that are needed to meet the minimum parking requirement, and permission from the property owner is required. She added that staff is also recommending that mobile food vendors be located more than 100 feet from another food-serving establishment (with the exception of other mobile food vendors) and more than 1,000 feet from schools while they are in session unless permission is granted by the school principal. Kluchka noted that the language allowing other mobile food vendors to be located within 100 feet from another food-serving establishment needs to be added to Subdivision 3(A)(10). Goellner agreed. Segelbaum suggested discussing the definition of eating establishments. Cera asked about creating one ordinance instead of having one for the Parks and Recreation Department and one for Planning. Goellner said there is a difference in staff expertise. The Parks and Recreation Department are experts in the operations and use of the parks and Planning has more expertise in the other zoning districts and land uses. Cera asked why seven is the suggested maximum amount of days for a food vendor license rather than three like the Parks Department allows. Goellner stated that it could become a heavy administrative commitment if a new permit has to be issued every day for three days. Cera asked if Minneapolis charges a seasonal fee. Goellner said Minneapolis requires mobile food vendors to have a brick and mortar, commercial kitchen in Minneapolis. Cera suggested that Golden Valley offer seasonal licenses. Kluchka agreed and said it would encourage trucks to come back. Goellner said she would do more research regarding seasonal licenses. Baker asked if a permit would be revocable. Goellner said yes. Baker said if the code is defining where mobile food vendors can park, he doesn't see the sense is calling out impervious surface requirements in the ordinance because there might be circumstances where an unpaved parking area might be the only place for them to park. He said he thinks that could be addressed in the permit application. Waldhauser said the City probably doesn't want food trucks parking on the only grassy landscaped area on a property. Baker said it is not clear in the ordinance language if the mobile food vendor would have to provide written permission from the property owner before they are issued a permit. Goellner stated the staff would get the property owner's permission as part of the permit application review process. Waldhauser referred to the language in the Parks and Recreation application regarding events held by a recognized Golden Valley neighborhood group. Goellner noted that that language only pertains to the Parks and Recreation permit. The Commissioners Minutes of the Golden Va�ley Planning Commission June a, 2015 Page 3 discussed the differences in food trucks versus private catering trucks and suggested the mobile food vending license specify that catering trucks provide food only for the people at a private party, and not for the public. Segelbaum said he would like a provision added to allow mobile food vendors to park during a business's off hours. Goellner said she would add language allowing the applicant and property owner to demonstrate that they won't need their required number of parking spaces. Kluchka asked how commercially zoned properties are currently allowing food trucks. Goellner said they are allowing them without a permit. Baker said he wants food trucks to come to Golden Valley and he doesn't want to be over-regulatory. Waldhauser questioned the costs and said she doesn't want to put any local restaurants out of business. Johnson asked for clarification on where a food truck would be able to park. Goellner explained that an applicant would have to demonstrate on a site plan where they will be parking as part of the application process. Kluchka asked if food trucks will be able to serve beer and wine. Goellner said that is permitted only at Brookview Park. Blum said he would like the language in the code and the application to be clear that food truck hours would be extended until 2 am for food trucks located at taprooms. Segelbaum asked about the motivation of Subdivision 2(B) regarding events located in the public right-of-way. Goetlner explained that that language is already in the Code pertaining to temporary uses, she is just proposing it be moved to this location. Johnson referred to the Parks and Recreation permit application and asked if there is supposed to be a privacy notice on the application if credit card information is required. Goellner said she would further research that. Baker noted that the staff report states that schools would need to get permission from their superintendent, but that the ordinance language states that they would need permission from the school principal. Goellner clarified that staff is recommending permiss:on be obtained from the school principal. Johnson suggested language be added stating that trash must also be removed from the property. Goellner agreed. Cera suggested language also be added about requiring recycling receptacles. Cera opened the public hearing. Seeing and hearing no one wishing to comment, Cera closed the public hearing. Minutes of the Golden Valley Planning Commission June 8, 2015 Page 4 Baker asked if a permit would have to be renewed every day for up to seven days. Goellner said no, a permit would be issues for a seven day period. Baker asked if a vendor wilt be able to renew their permit. Goellner said yes. Baker said this is the kind of activity that will encourage business in Golden Valley and he wants vendors to be able to renew their permit for as long as they want. Segelbaum said he thinks issuing a permit for seven days makes sense. Kluchka suggested that the code language say seven "consecutive" days. He said he would also like to allow seasonal permits. Cera stated that the section of code is titled "temporary uses" and questioned if a seasonal permit would really mean "temporary." Waldhauser added that food trucks would be operated year-round. Segelbaum said he is less inclined to offer seasonal permits because they could impact existing restaurants more than they realize. He said if seasonal permits are allowed he would want food trucks to be located further away from restaurants than currently proposed. Cera asked about the differences in the state license versus the county license. Goellner stated that if someone has state license they don't need a county license. Kluchka asked if a liquor license could be granted for a non-park property. Goellner said she doesn't think the City's liquor laws would allow that. Johnson questioned if there needs to be more discussion about competition and which zoning districts mobile food vendors would be allowed in. Waldhauser asked if private company events would be handled differently. Kluchka said he would welcome competition. Segelbaum reiterated that he thinks mobile food vendors should be required to be further than 100 feet away from a restaurant. Baker asked Goellner if she did any analysis of different buffer areas. Goellner said she did and said requiring 500 feet would be limiting. She said she would do some further analysis before this item goes to the City Council. Kluchka said he is comfortable with the 100 foot requirement. Johnson said he'd like there to be a larger distance between restaurants and mobile food vendors. Segelbaum said he thinks 200 feet would provide a balance. Segelbaum asked if eating establishment should be defined. Waldhauser suggested that the language say "public" eating establishment. Segelbaum asked if the language regarding where mobile food vendors need to park has to say asphalt or concrete, or if it could say impervious surface instead. Baker said he thinks that would be up to the person issuing the permit. Johnson referred to the Parks and Recreation policy regarding special events and stated that basing the fee on 20% of gross revenue seems high. Segelbaum asked if the language in the Code should be restricted to only food. Goellner stated that a mobile food vendor wouldn't be able to sell anything they don't have a license to sell. Minutes of the Golden Valley Planning Commission June 8, 2015 Page 5 Kluchka asked where the residential requirements are articulated. Goellner stated that mobile food vendors won't be allowed in residential zoning districts. Kluchka noted that the Parks and Recreation policy talks about neighborhood groups. Waldhauser clarified that the neighborhood group language in the park policy is referring to events held in a park. Baker said it is important that the finro policies be reconciled. Waldhauser asked about catering a private party in a residential area. Cera stated that catering trucks would not be considered mobile food vendors because mobile food vendors serve food to the public. Kluchka asked the Commissioners if they think mobile food vendors should be allowed in residential areas. The consensus of the Planning Commission was to not allow mobile vendors in residential areas at this time. MOVED by Baker, seconded by Segelbaum and motion carried unanimously to recommend approval of the proposed Zoning Code amendment regarding mobile food vendors with the amendments discussed. Informal Public Hearing —Zonin Code Text Amendment— Distilleries — ZO00-101 Ap ' ant: City of Golden Valley Purpose:``�,.. To consider adding la�guage in the Zoning Code regarding '" � tilleries. ",�,, � Goellner stated that craft dis ' leries and co�ktail rooms are a growing trend and many communities are starting to allb them. Sh� stated that staff is propos' language similar to the recently adopted brewery or•,� ance.�'�he discussed the dis ' � g process and the definitions of a distillery, a micro-disti a�r�d a cocktail roo , e referred to the state statutes regarding cocktail rooms and st ,. � that there, � imits of the amount of alcohol that can be served. The amount may not eic` ed .5.. nces per variety per person and no more than 1.5 ounces may be samples by a �y. ,'"rson on any day. � Goellner stated that staff is proposing, `t di�;�tillerie e a permitted use in the Industrial zoning district only and that micro- '�tilleries,�e a per� � ed use in the Light Industrial and �. Industrial zoning districts, and conditional e in the Mi d-Use zoning district. She stated that staff is also pro �sing that cockta�rooms smal e r,,han 50% of the floor area be permitted uses in t ight Industrial and I�dustrial zoning"` �; tricts and conditional uses in the Mixed- e zoning district. Cockt��l rooms that are lar` r than 50% of the floor area would be nditional uses in the Light Iri ustrial, Industrial, an ixed-Use zoning districts. Sh dded that a cocktail room woul require parking similar that of a Class III restaura so staff is recommending 1 space " er 60 square feet plus 1 space per 25 squar eet of bar area. F, x�. , aldhauser questioned why micro-distilleries; ould be allowed in the Mixed-Use zoning district at all. Goellner said she thinks they co`� Id be a good economic development tool. § 11.04 Section 11.04: Temporary Uses and Events Subdivision 1. Purpose and Effect The purpose of this Section is to provide conditions under which certain temporary uses and events may be allowed while ensuring a minimum negative impact to neighboring land uses. Subdivision 2. Authorized Temporary �ses Events A. The City Council may permit in any nonresidential trse zonin district for a temporary period not to exceed one hundred eighty (180) days temporary uses such as carnivals, circuses, farmers' markets, festivals and promotional events, including art fairs, upon the following: 1. Review of site plan for conformance to zoning regulations including, but not limited to: parking, signage, lighting, sound and landscaping; 2. Plans for vehicle and pedestrian access, parking and traffic control; 3. Provision of appropriate utilities including, but not limited to: sewer, water, waste disposal, organic recovery, recycling, surface water drainage, and power; 4. Provision of appropriate public safety measures, including, but not limited to, adequate steps to ensure fire protection and security of the site; 5. A cleanup plan; 6. Other conditions to address the public health, safety, welfare and community impacts from the tr�e event. 7. A proposed maximum time period not to exceed one hundred eighty (180) days. B. Such temporary trse� events shall be permitted within the required front yard, side yard, or rear yard; except where prohibited under Section 7.04 of this Code. They shall not be allowed within the public right-of-way or other public property unless such right-of-way will be closed for the event by the City. Subdivision 3. Authorized Temporary Uses A. The City Manager or his/her designee may issue a permit for a mobile food vending o�eration, defined as a self-contained vehicle or trailer used to prepare and serve food that is ready movable without disassembling, to operate for a temporary period not to exceed three (3) days in City Parks or one hundred twenty (120) days in non-residential zoning districts. The Golden Valley City Code Page 1 of 4 permit a�plication shali be on a form promulgated by the City Manager or his/her designee and shall include any information needed to establish compliance with this Subdivision. Any a��lication shall include the application fee amount established by the City Council in the master fee schedule, and such fee shall be not refundable if the permit is denied or the applicant withdraws or otherwise ceases operation or use of the permit. All mobile food vending permit applications and permits shall be subject to the followina conditions: 1. With the permit a�plication, the applicant shall provide written proof that the applicant is the current holder of all license(s) required by Hennepin County and the State of Minnesota, as applicable, with respect to a mobile food vending operation in which food is prepared and served on a vehicle or trailer, and the vendor shall maintain such license(s) in good standing for the duration of the permit. 2. The vendor shall complv with all other applicable provisions of the City Code includinq, but not limited to, those regulations regarding parking, sianage, lighting, and sound. 3. A permit is valid for only one (1) mobile food vending vehicle or trailer. 4. The permitted days of o�eration shall be set forth in the permit. A vendor that has obtained a permit under this Subdivision, upon the expiration thereof, may a�plv for another �ermit under this Subdivision. 5. The permit application shall contain a signed statement that the applicant shall hold harmless the City, and their officers and employees, and shall indemnify the City, and their officers and employees for any claims for damage to �roperty or injury to persons which may be occasioned by any activity carried on under the terms of the �ermit. 6. If the a�plication seeks to operate a vending operation in a City-owned property and/or on the public right-of-way, the application shall include documentation satisfactork to the City Manager or his/her designee evidencing the applicant's public liability, food products liabilitv, automobile liabilitx, and property damage insurance and that the City is or will be named as an additional insured on such insurance for all the permitted days of operation. Such insurance shall be maintained without change for the duration of the permitted da�s of operation. 7. The permit shall set forth the location(s) where the vending operation ma�operate and it shall be a violation of this Section for any vendor to engaae in vending operations in any location in the City other than the location(s) set forth in the permit. 8. Overnight parking and storaqe by the vendor is prohibited at the permitted location(�. The vendor must vacate the permitted location when not enyaging in vending operations. Hours of vending operation are limited to 8 am to 10 pm unless otherwise limited or extended by the City Manager or his/her designee, as set forth in the permit. 9. With the permit a�plication, the a�plicant shall provide written proof permission from the owner�) of the property_(ies) at the permitted location(s) to engage in vending operations at those location(s). If the permitted location is located on City-owned property, the issuance of the permit by the City shall constitute such permission. lO.The vendor must keep a co�y of the permit with the vending unit and demonstrate compliance with the permit and the permit conditions set forth in this Subdivision upon ins�ection. 11.The vending operation may not be located on public right-of-way unless riQht-of-way will be closed for an event by the City. The vending operation may not block sidewalks or drive aisles, impede pedestrian or vehicular traffic�or interfere with public safet� 12.The vending operation shall be located on an impervious surface unless unique circumstances cause the City Manaqer or his/her desiQnee to permit the operation to be located on a pervious surface. 13.No vending operation may occupy accessible parking spaces or parking spaces used to fulfill an r�property's minimum parking requirements under this Code, unless the applicable property owner can demonstrate that parking would be adequately su�plied during the vending operations. 14. The vendor must provide and remove trash and recycling receptacles for customer use and keep the site in a neat and orderly fashion. The permitted location(s) must be kept free from litter, refuse, debris, junk or other waste which results in offensive odors or unsightly conditions. The vendor shall be responsible for all litter and garbage left by customers. 15. No vending operation may be located within two hundred �200) feet at its closest point to the main entrance of a �ublic eating establishment or anx outdoor dining area with the exception of other mobile food vendors and except with the written consent of the pro�rietor of the establishment or dining area. No person shall either pay or accept payment for such written consent. With the permit application, the applicant shall provide written permission from the proprietor when a�plicable. 16. No vending operation may be located within one thousand (1,000) feet at its closest point to a school while the school is in session unless written permission from the school principal is provided in the permit a�plication. With the permit a�plication, the a�plicant shall provide written permission from the princi�al when a�plicable. 17. If while holding a permit granted under this Subdivision, a vendor violates any qrovision of this Subdivision, in addition to any other remedx �rovided under this Code, the City Manager or his/her designee maX revoke the permit and/or prohibit such vendor from obtaining a new permit under this Subdivision for a period not exceedingthirty (30) daxs from the date of such violation. ��tyof olden g va e Mobile Food Vendor Vehicle Permits Food Trucks in Golden Vallev Park Locations The Golden Valley Parks and Recreation Department allows licensed food truck operators' to apply for one day permits(up to three consecutive days)to operate in designated areas within the Golden Valley Park System. The cost of a permit is $40 per day,Monday-Sunday. Exceptions: • Holiday programs and special events sponsored by the City of Golden Valley will need to be approved by event and fee will be based on 20%of gross revenues. • Food truck operation and concession trailers participating in the annual Valley Days Celebration will work directly with the Celebration Committee on permit and fee requirements. • Food truck participation at an event sponsored by a recognized Golden Valley neighborhood group will require a permit however no fee will be charged. The locations listed below are the approved locations within the City of Golden Valley Park System where food trucks are allowed. Number of food trucks allowed per-location will dependent on the site selected. Food Truck Oneration Locations: Brookview Park Gearty Park Hampshire Park Lakeview Park Lion's Park Medley Park Scheid Park � Wesley Park (Other locations may be approved/please list preferred park) Food Truck Permit Information For those planning to operate a food truck within the City of Golden Valley Park System,please carefully review the following rules: • A city approved permit(from the Parks & Recreation Department) is required to park a food truck anywhere within the Golden Valley Parks System • All food truck operators must be inspected by an authorized agency and possess a current mobile food vendor vehicle license and/or a catering license from the Minnesota Department of Health (temporary food stand certificate),Hennepin County,City of Minneapolis or the City of St.Paul to be allowed to sell/distribute food and beverages in Golden Valley parks. If you are not a licensed food truck operator you must first obtain the necessary licenses before a permit will be granted. A copy of your vendor and caterers license must be attached to the permit application • All food truck operators must provide the City of Golden Valley an insurance rider listing the city as an additional insured on the policy for the permitted dates of operation • No refunds will be given for any reason once the permit has been issued • Permits aze only valid for one to three calendar days and are valid only for the dates specified • Operators are responsible for clean-up and trash removal generated from their operation in the immediate area • Food trucks must park in a designated parking lot and must not impede normal traffic flow • Food trucks may not park on the grass or pathways (unless special permission authorized) • Permits will be limited by area • Generally alcoholic beverages are not allowed in Golden Valley parks.A beer and wine permit can be obtained for Brookview Park only for an additional daily fee of$25.00 • Permits are valid only during park hours of 8 AM-10 PM. • Food truck operators will be assessed for all damages or extra trash clean-up within the park generated by their operation(if required) • Food trucks found operating without a permit or in areas not designated in the list above will be subject to a citation Please call the Golden Valley Parks&Recreation Department at 763-512-2345 or email kwiinikainen(�goldenvalleymn.�ov or SVanSloun@goldenvalleymn.gov for additional Food Truck permitting information. City of Golden Valley Parks&Recreation Department 200 Brookview Parkway Golden Valley, MN 55426 763-512-2345 (Mon-Fri 8:00 AM-4:30 PM) � � .�, Golden Valley Mobile Food Vendor Application �. ' � � � ���� �,�r�`� Brookview Community Center : � " zoo Brookview Parkway �_� � ���. �s} � � � � � °� � F � , ;, Golden Valley, Minnesota 554z6 `. � F � 763-51z-z345 • www.goldenvalleymn.gov Food Sales Hours: 8:0o AM —io:oo PM, Monday—Sunday �40 (Per-Day) Park: ❑Brookview ❑Gearty �Hampshire OLakeview Qions [�ledley [�cheid [�Vesley Q_ Date(s): Start Time: End Time: Description: Applicant Name: Email: Address: City: State: ZIP: Cell Phone: Other Phone: Please attach insurance rider listing City of Golden Valley as an additional insured and copy of Minnesota food sales license to app(ication. Permit will not be processed without current license and insurance certificate. I have read the Mobile Food Truck Permit information packet and agree to the conditions outlined in the packet. I understand that any agreement granted would be subject to the information outlined in the packet.I hereby agree that these rules shalf be strictly observed. I accept entire responsibility for the enforcement of these rules and agree to protect the Parks and Recreation facilities and indemnify the City of Golden Valley of any damage due to the use of the facility covered by this agreement. I also understand that this agreement may be revoked or canceled at any time,with or without cause,and that in the event of such revocation or cancellation,there shall be no claim or right to damages or reimbursement on account of any loss, damage or expense whatsoever. I further agree to protect, indemnify,save and hold harmless the City of Golden Valley and its officers and employees from any and all claims, liabilities,damages or rights of action directly or indirectly growing out of the use of the facilities requested in this application. I understand that the Parks and Recreation Department often take pictures of facilities that are used for brochures and marketing in which I grant permission. Signature of Permit Holder: Date: Fee$ Check# Cash Visa/MC Date Paid Rec'd By Visa/MS Account# Expires Signature ORDINANCE NO. 562, 2ND SERIES AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE CITY CODE Amending Chapter 11: Land Use Regulation (Zoning), Regarding Mobile Food Vendors The City Council for the City of Golden Valley hereby ordains as follows: Section 1. City Code Section 11.04 is amended by changing the title to Temporary Uses and Events. Section 2. City Code Section 11.04, Subdivision 2 is amended by changing the title to Authorized Temporary Events. Section 3. City Code Section 11.04, Subdivision 2(A) is amended by deleting the word "use" in the first sentence and replacing it with the word "zoning." Section 4. City Code Section 11.04, Subdivision 2(A)(6) is amended by deleting the word "use" and replacing it with the word "event." Section 5. City Code Section 11.04, Subdivision 2(B) is amended by deleting the word "uses" in the first sentence and replacing it with the word "events." Section 6. City Code Section 11.04 is amended by adding Subdivision 3 as follows: Subdivision 3. Authorized Temporary Uses A. The City Manager or his/her designee may issue a permit for a mobile food vending operation, defined as a self-contained vehicle or trailer used to prepare and serve food that is ready movable without disassembling, to operate for a temporary period not to exceed three (3) days in City Parks or one hundred twenty (120) days in non-residential zoning districts. The permit application shall be on a form promulgated by the City Manager or his/her designee and shall include any information needed to establish compliance with this Subdivision. Any application shall include the application fee amount established by the City Council in the master fee schedule, and such fee shall be not refundable if the permit is denied or the applicant withdraws or otherwise ceases operation or use of the permit. All mobile food vending permit applications and permits shall be subject to the following conditions: 1. With the permit application, the applicant shall provide written proof that the applicant is the current holder of all license(s) required by Hennepin County and the State of Minnesota, as applicable, with respect to a mobile food vending operation in which food is prepared and served on a vehicle or trailer, and the vendor shall maintain such license(s) in good standing for the duration of the permit. 2. The vendor shall comply with all other applicable provisions of the City Code including, but not limited to, those regulations regarding parking, signage, lighting, and sound. 3. A permit is valid for only one (1) mobile food vending vehicle or trailer. Ordinance No. 562 - continued 4. The permitted days of operation shall be set forth in the permit. A vendor that has obtained a permit under this Subdivision, upon the expiration thereof, may apply for another permit under this Subdivision. 5. The permit application shall contain a signed statement that the applicant shall hold harmless the City, and their officers and employees, and shall indemnify the City, and their officers and employees for any claims for damage to property or injury to persons which may be occasioned by any activity carried on under the terms of the permit. 6. If the application seeks to operate a vending operation in a City-owned property and/or on the public right-of-way, the application shall include documentation satisfactory to the City Manager or his/her designee evidencing the applicant's public liability, food products liability, automobile liability, and property damage insurance and that the City is or will be named as an additional insured on such insurance for all the permitted days of operation. Such insurance shall be maintained without change for the duration of the permitted days of operation. 7. The permit shall set forth the location(s) where the vending operation may operate and it shall be a violation of this Section for any vendor to engage in vending operations in any location in the City other than the location(s) set forth in the permit. 8. Overnight parking and storage by the vendor is prohibited at the permitted location(s). The vendor must vacate the permitted location when not engaging in vending operations. Hours of vending operation are limited to 8 am to 10 pm unless otherwise limited or extended by the City Manager or his/her designee, as set forth in the permit. 9. With the permit application, the applicant shall provide written proof permission from the owner(s) of the property(ies) at the permitted location(s) to engage in vending operations at those location(s). If the permitted location is located on City-owned property, the issuance of the permit by the City shall constitute such permission. 10. The vendor must keep a copy of the permit with the vending unit and demonstrate compliance with the permit and the permit conditions set forth in this Subdivision upon inspection. 11. The vending operation may not be located on public right-of-way unless right- of-way will be closed for an event by the City. The vending operation may not block sidewalks or drive aisles, impede pedestrian or vehicular traffic, or interFere with public safety. 12. The vending operation shall be located on an impervious surface unless unique circumstances cause the City Manager or his/her designee to permit the operation to be located on a pervious surFace. Ordinance No. 562 - continued 13. No vending operation may occupy accessible parking spaces or parking spaces used to fulfill any property's minimum parking requirements under this Code, unless the applicable property owner can demonstrate that parking would be adequately supplied during the vending operations. 14. The vendor must provide and remove trash and recycling receptacles for customer use and keep the site in a neat and orderly fashion. The permitted location(s) must be kept free from litter, refuse, debris, junk or other waste which results in offensive odors or unsightly conditions. The vendor shall be responsible for all litter and garbage left by customers. 15. No vending operation may be located within two hundred (200) feet at its closest point to the main entrance of a public eating establishment or any outdoor dining area with the exception of other mobile food vendors and except with the written consent of the proprietor of the establishment or dining area. No person shall either pay or accept payment for such written consent. With the permit application, the applicant shall provide written permission from the proprietor when applicable. 16. No vending operation may be located within one thousand (1,000) feet at its closest point to a school while the school is in session unless written permission from the school principal is provided in the permit application. With the permit application, the applicant shall provide written permission from the principal when applicable. Section 7. City Code Chapter 1 entitled "General Provisions and Definitions Applicable to the Entire City Code Including Penalty for Violation" and Section 11.99 entitled "Violation a Misdemeanor" are hereby adopted in their entirety, by reference, as though repeated verbatim herein. Section 8. This Ordinance shall take effect from and after its passage and publication as required by law. Adopted by the City Council this 21St day of July, 2015. /s/Shepard M. Harris Shepard M. Harris, Mayor ATTEST: /s/Kristine A. Luedke Kristine A. Luedke, City Clerk cit v 0� gotaen l YPhysical Development Department 763-593-8095/763-593-8109(fax) Executive Summary For Action Golden Valley City Council Meeting July 21, 2015 60 day deadline:July 20, 2015 60 day extension: September 18, 2015 Agenda Item 4. C. Public Hearing- Final PUD Plan for Golden Villas PUD No. 118 - 9130 and 9220 Olson Memorial Highway- Golden Villas, LLC, Applicant Prepared By Jason Zimmerman, Planning Manager Summary Golden Villas, LLC, represented by William Stoddard, is seeking approval of a Planned Unit Development Permit (PUD)to develop a six-story 172 unit market rate apartment building with one level of underground parking at 9130 and 9220 Olson Memorial Highway. The site currently houses a vacant bowling alley and a small office building. This is the location of the recent Tiburon Apartments development which was approved in 2012 but not constructed. The property is zoned R-4 High Density Residential and guided for long-term High Density Residential use on the General Land Use Plan map. The total area of the two lots is 2.57 acres. If approved, the two subject parcels would be replatted into one lot. The project is located within the area designated as the Highway 55 West Development Area by the City's Housing and Redevelopment Authority (HRA). The applicant's request for Tax Increment Financing (TIF) assistance was approved by the HRA in April of 2015. The total square footage of the proposed building is estimated to be 256,522 square feet. A majority of the parking would be in the underground level as well as the southerly portion of the ground floor level. Surface parking spaces would be located along four sides of the building. The remaining half of the first floor would contain the lobby, a fitness center, and seven units with individual entrances that would face Golden Valley Road. The remaining units would be located on levels two through six. Additional amenities include an outdoor pool, secure indoor bicycle parking for residents, a dog wash area, and a sixth floor outdoor terrace. The applicant is also proposing to utilize water conservation technology, to provide car sharing options, and to construct the building to be solar ready. A sidewalk is proposed to be added to the north side of the site along Golden Valley Road as part of the City's planned public improvements. While a significant amount of old pavement would be removed as part of the proposal, the massing of the new building, the surface parking spaces, and a 20 foot fire access lane around the rear of the property would result in an impervious surface amount of just under 77%. The current impervious surface amount is 79%. At the June 22, 2015, Planning Commission meeting, the Commission voted 7-0 to recommend approval of the Final PUD Plan. Comparison to Preliminary PUD Plan The Final PUD Plan has added 10 new units to the building, mostly by reconfiguring unit types and layouts. In addition, one walk-up unit was removed in order to increase the size of each of the other walk-up units. The lobby was relocated from the northwest corner of the building to the northeast corner. The parking deficit of the Preliminary PUD Plan has been addressed (increasing the number of parking spaces from 223 to 259) and the Final PUD Plan has the amount of parking typically required in the High Density Residential (R-4) Zoning District. Elevations and architectural renderings, which were not provided as part of the Preliminary PUD Plan, are now included. Findings and Conditions City Code establishes standards for PUDs, which are laid out in the Staff report to the Planning Commission. In addition, City Code establishes findings that must be made by the City when creating a PUD. The Council makes the following findings pursuant to City Code Section 11.55, Subd. 6(Q): 1. Quality Site Planning. The PUD Plan is tailored to the specific characteristics of the site and achieves a higher quality of site planning and design than generally expected under conventional provisions of the ordinance. The applicant's use of a PUD has allowed the project to address various aspect of the site including its location along a busy State highway. Staff believes this standard has been met. 2. Preservation. The PUD Plan preserves and protects substantial desirable portions of the site's characteristics, open space and sensitive environmental features including steep slopes, trees, scenic views, creeks, wetlands, and open waters. As the site is lacking open space or environmental features to preserve and protect, staff believes this standard has been met. 3. Efficient- Effective. The PUD Plan includes efficient and effective use (which includes preservation) of the land. As a redevelopment of long vacant underutilized properties, the proposal would make better use of existing infrastructure and help the area transition into a more mixed use and pedestrian friendly environment. Staff believes this standard has been met. 4. Compatibility. The PUD Plan results in development compatible with adjacent uses and is consistent with the Comprehensive Plan and redevelopment plans and goals. The redevelopment of these two underutilized properties for multifamily housing is compatible with the medium density residential property to the north and is consistent with the goals of the Comprehensive Plan. Staff believes this standard has been met. 5. General Health. The PUD Plan is consistent with preserving and improving the general health, safety and general welfare of the people of the City. By investing a long vacant property, this proposal helps rid the City of a blighted building, add value to the tax rolls, and provide new housing options for future residents. Staff believes this standard has been met. 6. Meets Requirements. The PUD Plan meets the PUD Intent and Purpose provision and all other PUD ordinance provisions. Staff believes this standard has been met. Staff recommends approval of the Final PUD Plan subject to the following conditions: 1. The plans prepared by ESG Architects, submitted with the application on May 21, 2015, shall become a part of this approval. 2. The recommendations and requirements outlined in the memo from the Fire Department, dated June 15, 2015, shall become a part of this approval. 3. The recommendations and requirements outlined in the memo from the Engineering Division, dated June 16, 2015, shall become a part of this approval. 4. Both spaces in any tandem parking arrangement shall be assigned to the same unit. 5. No snow shall be stored on site. 6. All signage must meet the requirements of the City's Sign Code (Section 4.20). 7. The City Attorney will determine if a title review is necessary prior to approval of the Final Plat. 8. The Final Plat shall include "P.U.D. No. 118" in its title. 9. A park dedication fee of$33,600 (2% of the estimated land value) shall be paid prior to release of the Final Plat. 10. This approval is subject to all other state, federal, and local ordinances, regulations, or laws with authority over this development. Attachments • Location Map (1 page) • Applicant's Narrative (3 pages) • Memo to the Planning Commission dated June 22, 2015 (6 pages) • Memo from the Fire Department dated June 15, 2015 (2 pages) • Memo from the Engineering Division dated June 16, 2015 (6 pages) • Unapproved Planning Commission Minutes dated June 22, 2015 (5 pages) • Site Plans submitted May 21, 2015 (24 pages) • Ordinance #568, Approval of Final Plan of Development, Golden Villa PUD No. 118 (2 pages) Recommended Action Motion to adopt Ordinance #568, Approval of Final PUD Plan, Golden Villas PUD No. 118, Golden Villas, LLC, Applicant. I •660 •112 1048, 101 1 07 111 12 012 4!29 156166 1 190 + 658 202 • 0000••••••••••• I{ • 201► 111 107103A03 • 622 628 634536 640 G44�gg650►656 203 • • •• • • • i 110 116121 158 186 .. .• .• •• .• . .. • 1 1 '204 110 109 105 102 626 630 632038 642 646 ' .209 2 2056► _ 208 205A Q v " a 71010.' C Z 1��2 12 c10 12, t _ 1£ -.3 79 D 1410 9240 9140 A °j � 8900 7. 130 9:° Subject Properties 1 9050 9000 93269310 12 ; • 12 z o Z 799210 10 9 91101 9400 —_ 3 ,Iden Valley Rd 9325 9100 9010 8950 y • • • • -- 9300 • 9130 '� - _ • • 9220 - 1.1wy No.55- • stat _ _ t1wY NO 55 "state 43 O`'S On NlernoTi 8945 `9131--f 9031 433 Z X101 > 424 9141' 201 421 Q ...r 3 302• c C , 29147 3o6 _ Z 3031 301 347 c 410 8928 8920 8912 4 a. ,' 102 0 9131 A LL' 13 L 10s 1 101 345 9143 Wally St «a , 9201 0201 339 N -- ._jr., • 91318 302 3 893 i 89258917'8913 306 .8909 325 L9131 C 301 General Milts Nature Preserve 9131D 9145 ' 9145,102 Harold Ave _ i41p-, u4,. 30 X20201 - c 9145E 02 G Narrative, Development Concept and Rationale for Variance Requests Narrative & Development Concept: Golden Villas, LLC offers this narrative under Golden Valley Zoning Code § 11.55 ("PUD Ordinance")to demonstrate compliance with the PUD Ordinance Purpose and Intent section and all other relevant section of the PUD Ordinance. The Project meets all aspects including the following goals highlighted in the PUD Ordinance: 1. Encourage,preserve and improve the health, safety and general welfare of the people of the City by encouraging the use of contemporary land planning principles. 2. Achieve a high quality of site planning, design, landscaping, and building materials which are compatible with the existing and planned land uses. 3. Encourage preservation and protection of desirable site characteristics and open space and protection of sensitive environmental features including steep slopes, trees, scenic views, water ways, wetlands and lakes. 4. Encourage construction of affordable housing and a variety of housing types. 5. Encourage creativity and flexibility in land development. 6. Encourage efficient and effective use of land, open space, streets, utilities and other public facilities. 7. Allow mixing land uses and assembly and development of land to form larger parcels. 8. Encourage development in transitional areas which achieve compatibility with all adjacent and nearby land uses. 9. Achieve development consistent with the Comprehensive Plan. 10. Achieve development consistent with the City's redevelopment plans and goals. The proposed project("Project") will consist of the redevelopment of two parcels that are presently outdated and underused into a well-planned and modern 172-unit market rate apartment. The Project will incorporate many of the latest land-use planning tools including underground rainwater storage and solar ready features. Our seven story building will include a full story of below-grade parking with additional parking on the "Street Level" allowing the site to provide the full parking requirements called for by the underlying zoning. In addition to parking,the Street Level incorporates many modern design and land-use features. The units will include rentable "townhomes"that have pet friendly walkouts and patios incorporating green-scaping. The Street Level will also include a complete fitness area that will offer not only individual workout equipment but provide a dedicated group workout area. Level 2 will have a beautiful amenity terrace with gorgeous club room opening onto the pool deck. Our Penthouse level featuring higher ceilings will have an outdoor terrace facing southeast with expansive views of Golden Valley's golf courses, open areas, and the downtown Minneapolis skyline. Our design team at ESG Architects is designing a custom, modern building constructed as 5stories of wood frame construction over two stories of concrete construction. The building's exterior will generate a modern and luxury setting through the coordinated exterior facade including a mixture of stucco, metal panel and fiber cement siding, with extra-large efficient windows to take advantage of Golden Valley's outstanding views. The modified U shaped building will feature abundant landscaping and ample parking. Contemporary land planning and exterior design vision was the core of our team's mission. The Project is also designed to include many environmentally friendly features including a Solar- ready building and the use of advanced Water Conservation Technologies including moderators, showerheads, flushometers and ballcock& diverter supply components to reduce our water consumption at our building. We also will strive for Alternative Transportation, car sharing and compact car use by providing designated parking spaces including Car2Go vehicle spaces, ample indoor/outdoor bicycle and moped/scooter parking spaces. Two properties have been assembled for our project and the public will benefit in numerous ways with the City's economic base enhancement, including job creation of about 8-12 on-site employees and approximately 240 construction jobs, a large blighted building will be removed, and additional unsubsidized private development will be encouraged after our development spearheads new activity in the area. The diversity of housing products will be enhanced with our offerings including rentable street level townhomes with individual entrances (pet owners will love these), Alcove units, 1 BR units, 1 BR/Den units, 2 BR units and 2 BR/Den units, and Penthouse units offering higher ceilings, fireplaces, finish levels and more! In sum, the Project fits squarely within the enumerated goals of a PUD. The Project will meet the purpose and other provisions of the PUD Ordinance, as well as the Comprehensive Plan, Land Use Goals and Housing Goals, the City's Redevelopment Plans, and the Metropolitan Council's increased density goals. Variance Requests: As scholars have noted, "Flexibility is perhaps the most often cited advantage of PUDs."1 It is that flexibility that allows multiple lots to be developed in a maximally efficient manner. The Project is no different. In order to redevelop two properties presently "improved"with functionally obsolete buildings that must be razed into a modern,market rate apartment with unique land-use features and advanced environmental/sustainability features, it needs flexibility from the strict application of the standard zoning requirements designed for a single lot development. To proceed, the Project needs two variances from standard zoning requirements: a variance to allow over 60% impervious surfaces limit and a variance to allow the proposed height. The Project as proposed is not only using the combined properties in a"reasonable manner" not strictly permitted by the standard zoning requirements, it is a planned development that puts two functionally obsolete properties to their highest and best use. The Project has relied on numerous professionals to create a well-designed development that spans multiple lots and incorporates the latest amenities, advanced land-use tools, and coordinated design features. 1 Michael Murphy&Joseph Stinson,Planned Unit Developments,Pace University School of Law p.3-4(1996). The Project is not only reasonable, but also one that is designed with the neighborhood character in mind. It is a high-density residential development in a high-density residential zoning district. It is also expected to be the first of many redevelopments that will follow in that neighborhood. The basis for our variance requests is that the variances are necessary to overcome the facts that we must raze and remediate the functional obsolesce that exists on two properties and address the physical configuration of these two properties in a manner that will permit us to construct a building, on the combined parcels, with enough density to be competitive in the marketplace with our market rate rental apartment building. For example, the fire department is requesting a 20-foot fire access road around the entire building, which adds a large amount of impervious area to our project. It is should also be noted that the impervious surface coverage of the two parcels before the redevelopment sat at 79%. As for the height, the central component of the PUD is a comprehensive,multi-lot redevelopment that includes advanced design features for the broader benefit. To accomplish that intent on these two lots of limited size that are burdened by existing functional obsolescence, it is necessary to have five stories of wood framing over one to two stories of the concrete parking structure. We decided on two concrete levels (both are primarily parking levels-one fully underground) as it helped us add not only more covered parking,but adds the street level townhome units and offered us more room to spread out our amenities and building features. Therefore our building height will vary from grade and be approximately 74 feet in height and seven stories, versus the sixty-feet and five-story limits of the standard zoning requirements. File: GV Development Concept and Rationale-2 CIo) of t go e MEMORANDUM llVa ey Planning Department 763-593-8095/763-593-8109 (fax) Date: June 22, 2015 To: Golden Valley Planning Commission From: Jason Zimmerman, Planning Manager Subject: Informal Public Hearing— Final PUD Plan for Golden Villas PUD No. 118 — 9130 and 9220 Olson Memorial Highway— Golden Villas, LLC, Applicant Background Golden Villas, LLC, represented by William Stoddard, is seeking approval of a Planned Unit Development (PUD) Permit to develop a six story 172 unit market rate apartment building with one level of underground parking at 9130 and 9220 Olson Memorial Highway. The site currently houses a vacant bowling alley and a small office building. This is the location of the recent Tiburon Apartments development which was approved in 2012 but not constructed. The property is zoned R-4 High Density Residential and guided for long-term High Density Residential use on the General Land Use Plan map. The total area of the two lots is 2.57 acres; it is bounded by Olson Memorial Highway to the south and Golden Valley Road to the north. The adjacent property to the west contains the National Camera Exchange and the adjacent property to the east contains a small one story office building. If approved, the two subject parcels would be replatted into one lot. The project is located within the area designated as the Highway 55 West Development Area by the City's Housing and Redevelopment Authority (HRA). The Applicant's application for Tax Increment Financing (TIF) assistance was approved by the HRA in April of 2015. Summary of Proposal The proposed PUD would allow the Applicant to construct a 172 unit market rate apartment building with six stories above ground and one level of underground parking located centrally on the site. A majority of the parking would be in the underground level as well as the southerly portion of the ground floor level. Surface parking spaces would be located along four sides of the building. The remaining half of the first floor would contain the lobby, a fitness center, 5 two- bedroom units, and 2 one-bedroom plus den units with individual entrances that would face Golden Valley Road. Levels two through six would contain a mixture of 33 alcove units, 78 one- 1 bedroom units, 46 two-bedroom units, and 8 two-bedroom plus den units. Additional amenities include an outdoor pool, secure indoor bicycle parking for residents, a dog wash area, and a sixth floor outdoor terrace. The Applicant is also proposing to utilize water conservation technology, car sharing options, and construct to be solar ready. The total square footage of the building is estimated to be 256,522 square feet. Building materials are proposed to be a mixture of brick, metal panels, fiber cement siding, stucco, and wood siding. Unit sizes would range from 552 square feet to 1,360 square feet. 206 of the 259 parking spaces would be enclosed while 53 would be surface spaces. 29 of the enclosed parking spaces would be tandem spaces. Staff is recommending that both spaces in any tandem parking arrangement be assigned to one unit in the building. The applicant has indicated one surface space would be dedicated for two car share vehicles and one surface space would be dedicated for 5-6 surface moped spaces. Outdoor bicycle parking would be provided to compliment the indoor secure bicycle storage. The pool and terrace would be located on level two and at the rear of the building nearest Olson Memorial Highway. A sidewalk is proposed to be added to the north side of the site along Golden Valley Road as part of the City's planned public improvements. Landscaping is concentrated around the front of the building and the perimeter of the site. Additional trees and shrubs will surround the outdoor dog run at the back of the building. While a significant amount of old pavement would be removed as part of the proposal, the massing of the new building, the surface parking spaces, and a 20 foot fire access lane around the rear of the property would increase the impervious surface amount to just under 77%. Comparison to Preliminary PUD Plans The Final PUD Plans have added 10 additional units to the building, mostly by reconfiguring unit types and layouts. In addition, one walk-up unit was removed in order to increase the size of each of the other walk-up units. The lobby was relocated from the northwest corner of the building to the northeast corner. The parking deficit of the Preliminary Plan has been addressed (increasing the number of parking spaces from 223 to 259) and the Final Plan has the amount of parking typically required in the High Density Residential (R-4) Zoning District. Elevations and architectural renderings, which were not provided as part of the Preliminary PUD Plan, are now included. 2 } m i N o 622-50 j t I 884° 9240 9140 9210 9110 i 9400 0 9050 9000 i Cq 9300 9200 8900 9326 rn O.W www. . ,.- G o l cue n V CD _.. ; I CD i 9300 9130 9220 __r-- �e > rn 433 c m m t 9131 0 424 423 9141 a' 421 t ! } t 347 N rn N cv u, fit? 9147 o, rn v d10 m m m 4( I N �..r 9201 345 s' L r i 9143 339 °' a .. . : 325 ' o PUD 118 - Site Map Land Use and Zoning Considerations The property was reguided for long-term High Density Residential use in the Comprehensive Plan and rezoned to R-4 High Density Residential in 2012 in anticipation of the Tiburon Apartment project. As a PUD, the City can offer flexibility from the regular zoning requirements in order to achieve a better development. The following table summarizes how closely the requirements of the R-4 High Density Residential Zoning District are met under the current proposal: R-4 High Density Residential Golden Villas PUD 118 Use Multiple-family dwellings Apartment Density Over 12 units/acre 66.9 units/acre Dimensional Standards Height Maximum of 5 stories or 60 6 stories above ground and feet or else by CUP 74 feet Minimum lot area 20,000 square feet 2.57 acres Minimum lot width 150' 480'+ 3 Structure coverage 40% maximum 40.9% Impervious coverage 60% maximum approx. 76.5% Minimum front setback 25' approx. 29' Minimum side and rear 20' approx. 28' (rear), 62' (east), setbacks and 78' (west) Parking for 172 units 1.5 spaces per dwelling unit 258 259— includes 29 tandem spaces PUD Standards and Guidelines There are a handful of standards and guidelines set within Section 11.55 of the City Code that regulate PUDs. The following table summarizes how closely the requirements of this section are met under the current proposal: Planned Unit Developments Golden Villas PUD 118 Frontage 100' or adequate to serve the 480'+ development Principal building setbacks No closer than its height to NA the rear or side property line of a single-family district All building setbacks No closer than 15' from the NA back of curb along internal roadway systems Private service facilities or Operation and maintenance NA common areas agreements required Engineering and Fire Safety Considerations As is standard practice for development proposals, plans for this proposal were reviewed by the City's Engineering Division to ensure the site can be adequately served by public utilities and that any traffic issues are resolved. A memorandum from the Engineering Division that addresses traffic, sanitary sewer and water services, stormwater management, and tree preservation and landscaping is attached. The Fire Department reviewed this proposal to ensure that buildings are equipped with fire protection systems and that adequate emergency vehicle access is achieved on the site. A memorandum from the Fire Department that addresses fire access, water supply, fire hydrants, and emergency responder radio coverage is attached. Anticipated Development Timeline Demolition is anticipated to take place in August of 2015 followed by excavation and foundation work in September and October. Wood frame construction would be expected to begin in January of 2016. 4 Justification for Consideration as a PUD The PUD process is an optional method of regulating land use in order to permit flexibility in uses allowed, setbacks, height, parking requirements, and number of buildings on a lot. Applications for PUDs must be consistent with the Intent and Purpose provisions and the PUD requirements and principles and standards adhered to in the City. In order to be approved as a PUD, the City must be able to make the following findings: 1. Quality Site Planning. The PUD plan is tailored to the specific characteristics of the site and achieves a higher quality of site planning and design than generally expected under conventional provisions of the ordinance. The applicant's use of a PUD has allowed the project to address various aspect of the site including its location along a busy State highway. Staff believes this standard has been met. 2. Preservation. The PUD plan preserves and protects substantial desirable portions of the site's characteristics, open space and sensitive environmental features including steep slopes, trees, scenic views, creeks, wetlands, and open waters. As the site is lacking open space or environmental features to preserve and protect, staff believes this standard has been met. 3. Efficient— Effective. The PUD plan includes efficient and effective use (which includes preservation) of the land. As a redevelopment of long vacant underutilized properties,the proposal would make better use of existing infrastructure and help the area transition into a more mixed use and pedestrian friendly environment. Staff believes this standard has been met. 4. Compatibility. The PUD Plan results in development compatible with adjacent uses and is consistent with the Comprehensive Plan and redevelopment plans and goals. The redevelopment of these two underutilized properties for multifamily housing is compatible with the medium density residential property to the north and is consistent with the goals of the Comprehensive Plan. Staff believes this standard has been met. 5. General Health. The PUD plan is consistent with preserving and improving the general health, safety and general welfare of the people of the City. By investing a long vacant property, this proposal helps rid the City of a blighted building, add value to the tax rolls, and provide new housing options for future residents. Staff believes this standard has been met. 6. Meets Requirements. The PUD plan meets the PUD Intent and Purpose provision and all other PUD ordinance provisions. Staff believes this standard has been met. Recommendation Staff recommends approval of the Final PUD Plan for Golden Villas PUD No. 118, subject to the following conditions: 1. The plans prepared by ESG Architects, submitted with the application on May 21, 2015, shall become a part of this approval. 2. The recommendations and requirements outlined in the memo from the Fire Department, dated June 15, 2015, shall become a part of this approval. 3. The recommendations and requirements outlined in the memo from the Engineering Division, dated June 16, 2015, shall become a part of this approval. 4. Both spaces in any tandem parking arrangement shall be assigned to the same unit. 5. All signage must meet the requirements of the City's Sign Code (Section 4.20). 5 6. The City Attorney will determine if a title review is necessary prior to approval of the Final Plat. 7. The Final Plat shall include "P.U.D. No. 118" in its title. 8. A park dedication fee of$33,600 (2% of the estimated land value) shall be paid prior to release of the Final Plat. 9. This approval is subject to all other state, federal, and local ordinances, regulations, or laws with authority over this development. Attachments Location Map (1 page) Applicant's Narrative (3 pages) Memo from the Fire Department dated June 15, 2015 (2 pages) Memo from the Engineering Division dated June 16, 2015 (6 pages) Site Plans submitted May 21, 2015 (24 pages) 6 t ( lcin v Fire Department 763-593-8079 / 763-593-8098 (fax) Date: June 15, 2015 To: Jason Zimmerman, Planning Manager From: John Crelly, Fire Chief Subject: Final PUD #118 for Golden Villas, L.L.C. (9130 & 9220 Olson Memorial Hwy) The Golden Valley Fire Department has reviewed the final PUD plans submitted May 21, 2015 for the proposed Golden Villas located at 9130—9220 Olson Memorial Highway. This final PUD application proposes the construction of a 172 unit market rate apartment building. The proposed building is 6 levels above grade and 1 level bEllow grade. The two lower levels are constructed of concrete and will provide inside parking of vehicles. The upper five floors are constructed of wood frame construction for the residential housing. SITE The plans show the construction of a multi-story "U" shaped building on the site of the old bowling alley and a small office building to the east. The proposal shows a 20+foot wide access road around the entire building. The access road appears to be designed adequately to allow for proper movement of large fire trucks. The general layout of the site appears to meet the requirements of Minnesota State Fire Code section 503.1 for fire access roads. BUILDING / SITE The water supply system for the proposed site shall be capable of supplying the required fire flow for this !wilding based on location, type of construction and size of building. Minnesota State Fire Code Appendix B and C will require a minimum total flow of 2000 gpm from a minimum of 2 fire hydrants with an average spacing of 450 feet. The revised drawings are showing a 6-inch water line and two fire hydrants on the east and west sides of the building. It appears that the layout of on- site fire hydrants is very close to meeting the 450 feet spacing requirement. All private fire hydrants shall meet the City's specifications and shall be paint red in color. The installation of a fire hydrant shall be within 150 feet of any fire department sprinkler/standpipe connection located on the building. The plan does not indicate a location of the fire department connection. City or private fire hydrants may be used when determining the 150 feet distance. Page 1 of 2 All connections to private fire service mains for fire protection systems shall be arranged in accordance with 2010 edition of NFPA 24 section 6.2.11 options 1, 2 or 6. Based on the buildings current configuration the only option is to provide a Yard Post Indicator Valve (YPIV) 40 feet from the building for controlling water on the 6-inch fire line going to the building. Other building/site considerations includes the type and placement of landscaping trees/shrubs. Landscaping trees/shrubs shall not obstruct or hinder the ladder operation from any secondary escape windows from any apartment units located in this building. Radio operability—All new buildings shall have approved radio coverage for emergency responders within the building based upon the existing coverage levels of the public safety communication systems of the jurisdiction at the exterior of the building. The building shall be considered to have acceptable emergency responder radio coverage when signal strength measurements in 95 percent of all areas on each floor of the building meet the minimum signal strength requirement of-95 dBm receivable and transmittable from the building. The construction of this building shall comply with all applicable codes. SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS The Golden Valley Fire Department recommends approval subject to the following conditions: 1. Prior to occupancy, the owner needs to have the building evaluated for 800 mhz radio coverage. Areas of deficiencies will need to be corrected. 2. Prior to building permits being issue, the developer shall submit an analysis showing that the road around the building is of adequate design to accommodate the weight and turning movements a fire department ladder truck. If you have any questions, please contact me at 763-593-8065, or e-mail crellv@goldenvalleymn.gov Page 2 of 2 Physical Development Department 763-593-8030/763-593-3988(fax) Date: June 16, 2015 To: Jason Zimmerman, Planning Manager From: Jeff Oliver, PE, City Engineer Eric Eckman, Public Works S cialist Subject: Final PUD Plan Review—Golden Villas (9130 and 9220 Olson Memorial Highway) Engineering staff has reviewed the Final Planned Unit Development (PUD) Plans for Golden Villas as submitted by Golden Villas, LLC. The proposed PUD is located at 9130 and 9220 Olson Memorial Highway in the northeast quadrant of the intersection of Trunk Highways 55 and 169. The redevelopment consists of combining two existing commercial properties to construct a seven-story, 172-unit apartment building. This memorandum discusses issues identified during the Engineering review that must be addressed prior to approval of the Final Plat. The comments contained in this review are based on the plans submitted to the City on May 18, 2015. Site Plan This redevelopment will consolidate two commercial properties to create one lot for the proposed apartment building. The two vacant commercial buildings will be demolished as part of the project. The new apartment building has two levels of enclosed parking that will provide 205 parking spaces, as well as surface parking areas that will provide 53 spaces. The two existing driveways onto Golden Valley Road will be removed and replaced with two new driveways located at the northwest and northeast corners of the site. The current alignment of the west driveway appears to be an issue as it does not align with the driveway across the street, the ramp down to the underground parking, or the western access road to the "move in/service area" located in the south parking lot, which will make truck turning movements difficult. The Developer must shift the driveway as far west as feasible to better align with these other access points. The final construction drawings for the PUD must also clearly show the dimensions of all paved areas and access roads shown on the site plan, as well as symbols for one and two way travel. The City's Comprehensive Plan shows proposed sidewalks along Golden Valley Road and other streets in this vicinity. Because this PUD is part of a larger redevelopment area (called Highway 55 West Redevelopment Area), the City will construct the sidewalks adjacent to this property, along with other public improvements planned for this corridor. The plans submitted by the Developer show a future sidewalk along Golden Valley Road which appears to be consistent with the City's vision for this redevelopment area. In the final construction drawings, the Developer must show connections from the proposed apartment building to the future public sidewalk. Internal sidewalks and pedestrian ramps must comply with Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) guidelines to the extent feasible. A Development Agreement will be drafted by the City at the time of final plat approval which will further detail the conditions and costs associated with the development. The Developer will be required to waive its right to appeal any special assessments that result from the construction of public improvements within the redevelopment area, consistent with state statutes. The new driveway aprons into the site must be constructed according to City standards for commercial driveway aprons. The driveways entrances must include curb tapers, in locations approved by the City, that allow for ADA pedestrian ramps to be constructed by the City at a later date. A City Right-of-Way Management Permit is required for driveway work and for all excavations and obstructions in public right-of-way. Additionally, the Developer or Contractor will be required to obtain the appropriate permits for all activities associated with demolition and removals prior to commencing work. The property proposed for redevelopment is adjacent to Trunk Highway 55 and therefore the plans are subject to the review and comment of the Minnesota Department of Transportation (MnDOT). Proposed Plat The Developer has addressed the items listed in the preliminary plan review and therefore the proposed plat appears to meet the City's requirements. Traffic and Access Management The existing street system in the vicinity of this development has adequate capacity to accommodate the new vehicle trips generated by this PUD. However,the intersection of Golden Valley Road, Decatur Avenue, and Trunk Highway 55 has existing operational issues that are currently being evaluated as part of the public improvements planned for the Highway 55 West Redevelopment Area. Utility Plan The City's sanitary sewer and water systems that provide service to these properties have adequate capacity to accommodate the proposed redevelopment. The Developer has demonstrated that extension of services is possible, as shown on the Utility Plan. According to the City's records, there are three sewer laterals serving the existing properties.The plans submitted include the installation of a new sanitary sewer service to the building near its northeast corner, but does not indicate the removal of the existing sanitary sewer services. The final construction drawings must be modified to include the removal of the three existing services from the main within Golden Valley Road to the existing buildings. The new sanitary sewer service will be owned and maintained by the Developer, consistent with City Code. City records indicate there are three water services serving the existing property. The Developer proposes to install new domestic and fire protection water services to the building. However, as with the sewer services, the plans do not indicate removal of the existing water services and must be modified to identify their removal from the main to the existing buildings. Upon construction, a small portion of the water services will be owned and maintained by the City (from the City's watermain to the shut-off valves located in the street right-of-way, including the valves themselves). The Developer will own and maintain the water and fire services between the shut-off valves and the building. All proposed valves must be shown in the final construction drawings consistent with City standards. The proposed Utility Plan also indicates the extension of four fire hydrants into the site from the City's watermain within Golden Valley Road. The placement of the hydrants and other fire- related appurtenances are also subject to the review of the Fire Chief. The Developer will be required to enter into a Maintenance Agreement with the City which will outline ownership and maintenance responsibilities for the utility services and fire hydrants. This agreement will be prepared by the City for the Developer's signature at the time of final plat approval. A City Right-of-Way Permit is required for all obstructions and excavations within City streets and rights-of-way. The plans indicate that Golden Valley Road will be open cut in multiple locations. Therefore, a Right-of-Way Permit is required for the work. In addition, because the City overlaid Golden Valley Road with new asphalt in 2012, an increased level of restoration is required for this roadway to meet City standards. According to City standards, cutting a pavement less than five years old requires a full-width pavement mill and overlay at a length determined by the City Engineer. The City will need to further evaluate and determine the extent of restoration required by the Developer as this PUD and the planned public improvement project progresses. The City has an Inflow and Infiltration (1/1) Ordinance that requires the sanitary sewer service to be brought into compliance when developing or subdividing a property. The Developer will be removing the existing sanitary sewer laterals to the main. The new service lateral will require an 1/1 inspection upon construction. The new lateral must achieve compliance with the 1/1 Ordinance, prior to occupancy of the building. In order to ensure that the existing laterals will be removed to the satisfaction of the City, the Developer will be required to post a financial security. Staff will include this item in the 1/1 Deposit Agreement which must be executed between the property owner and the City before the final plat is approved. Stormwater Management and Gradin The property being redeveloped is located within the Main Stem sub-watershed of the Bassett Creek Watershed and is subject to the review of the Bassett Creek Watershed Management Commission (BCWMC). The BCWMC will review the plans for compliance with its water quality and erosion control standards. Permits for buildings and site work related to new construction will not be issued by the City until approval from the BCWMC is received. The Developer has proposed the construction of stormwater quality treatment facilities as part of this redevelopment consisting of an underground pipe gallery designed for runoff rate control and volume reduction through the use of infiltration techniques. The Developer will own and maintain the storm sewer and stormwater quality treatment systems onsite and will be required to enter into a Maintenance Agreement for these facilities. The agreement will be drafted by the City and must be signed, prior to approval of the final plat. This PUD is subject to the City's Stormwater Management Ordinance. A City Stormwater Management Permit will be required before the start of construction, which includes a plan meeting City standards. The following items must be addressed prior to submittal of final construction drawings and issuance of a stormwater management permit: 1. In order to maximize the efficiency and the useful life of the infiltration system, the Developer must include sump manholes fitted with SAFL baffles, or other approved pre- treatment devices, to remove sediment from stormwater runoff prior to discharge into the infiltration system. 2. More information is needed regarding access to the underground infiltration system and the proposed maintenance plan and schedule. 3. Staff recommends test pits or borings be conducted in the proposed location of the infiltration system to ensure adequate soils and infiltration rates are present. 4. Staff recommends the bituminous spillway in the southwest corner of the parking lot be constructed with concrete. 5. Staff recommends the ramp down to the underground parking have a curve or plateau rather than a point at the high point where the grades transition. 6. A trench drain or similar approved structure must be shown in the final construction drawings along with the pipe locations and method of discharge (pump, gravity, etc). 7. The elevation of the Level P1 Parking garage must be indicated on the final drawings. The Stormwater Management Plan includes a discharge from the infiltration system into the north ditch of Trunk Highway 55. Therefore, approval of the Stormwater Management Plan is subject to the review and comment of MnDOT. In addition, the Developer or Contractor will be required to obtain the appropriate permits from MnDOT and MCES for work within their respective easements and rights-of-way along Highway 55. A Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) Construction Stormwater Permit is required for this development. The Developer must provide a copy of this permit to the City once it is obtained. The City Stormwater Management Permit will not be issued until a copy of the MPCA permit is provided. Tree Preservation Plan and Landscape Plan This PUD is subject to the City's Tree Preservation Ordinance and Minimum Landscape Standards. The plans submitted by the Developer appear to meet these requirements. However,the Developer has proposed trees within the public right-of-way (between the sidewalk and the street) along Golden Valley Road. Consistent with the City's right-of-way management ordinance, the Developer must remove the trees from the plans and relocate them to its private property. A Tree Preservation Permit is required before construction can begin. In addition, a cost estimate to furnish and install all landscaping plant materials must be provided to the City in order to determine the financial securities that must be posted by the Developer, as part of the Development Agreement. Summary and Recommendations Engineering staff recommends approval of the Final PUD Plans for Golden Villas, subject to the comments contained in this review. These comments are summarized as follows: 1. The Developer must shift the west driveway as far west as feasible to better align with the driveway across the street and the west access road to the "move in/service area" located in the south parking lot, as discussed in this review. 2. The Developer must show pedestrian connections from the proposed apartment building to the future public sidewalk along Golden Valley Road. 3. The final construction drawings must be modified to include the removal of the three existing water and sewer services from the main within Golden Valley Road to the existing buildings. 4. The Developer must enter into a Maintenance Agreement for the utilities and stormwater quality treatment facilities, as discussed in this review. 5. The Developer must complete an 1/1 Deposit Agreement with the City prior to final plat approval. 6. The proposed building must become compliant with the City's Inflow and Infiltration Ordinance, prior to occupancy of the building. 7. A Right-of-Way Permit will be required for the excavation of Golden Valley Road and the street must be restored to City standards, as discussed in this review. B. The Stormwater Management Plan items listed in this review must be addressed prior to issuance of permits. 9. The Developer must remove the proposed trees within the public right-of-way along Golden Valley Road and relocate them to its private property. 10. The Developer or its contractors must obtain the appropriate permits from the City and other agencies prior to development. 11. Final PUD approval is subject to the review and comments of the Minnesota Department of Transportation, Metropolitan Council Environmental Services, the Bassett Creek Watershed Management Commission, and other agencies as required. 12. The items above must be addressed prior to final plat approval. Approval is also subject to the comments of the City Attorney and other City staff. Please feel free to call if you have any questions regarding this matter. C: Tom Burt, City Manager Marc Nevinski, Director of Physical Development Emily Goellner, Planner John Crelly, Fire Chief Al Lundstrom, Park Maintenance Supervisor and City Forester Bert Tracy, Public Works Maintenance Manager Jerry Frevel, Building Official RJ Kakach, Utilities Engineer Eric Seaburg, Engineer Tom Hoffman, Water Resources Technician Minutes of the Golden Valley Planning Commission June 22, 2015 Page 9 3. Informal Public Hearing — Final Plan Review— Planned Unit Development (PUD #118) — Golden Villas — 9130 & 9220 Olson Memorial Highway Applicant: Golden Villas, LLC Address: 9130 & 9220 Olson Memorial Highway Purpose: To allow a six-story, 172-unit apartment building with one level of underground parking. Goellner referred to a location map and discussed the applicant's Final PUD proposal to construct a 172 unit, market rate apartment building with six levels above ground and one level of underground parking at 9130 & 9220 Olson Memorial Highway. The existing bowling alley and office building on the properties will be demolished. She stated that there will be a fitness center, seven units with individual entrances, a dog wash area, a dog run area, bicycle parking, a pool, and a rooftop terrace. Goellner stated that the properties were rezoned and re-designated on the Comprehensive Plan General Land Use Plan Map to High Density Residential in 2012 as part of the Tiburon PUD proposal which was not completed. Goellner discussed the amount of impervious surface coverage on the site and stated that currently the property has approximately 80% impervious coverage and that the applicant is proposing to have approximately 76.5% impervious surface. She added that the proposed landscaping is concentrated at the front of the building and along the perimeter of the site and that a sidewalk is planned along Golden Valley Road. Segelbaum noted the changes between the Preliminary Plan review and this Final Plan review including: improved fire access, new elevations, and the implementation of a TIF District. He referred to the amount of impervious surface and asked if that amount has changed. Waldhauser said she thought it is now slightly higher because of the new fire access road. Goellner stated that another change is that the applicant is now providing an adequate amount parking and they moved the location of the entrance lobby. Kluchka asked about the timing of the future sidewalk. Goellner said she did not know, but she would find out. Kluchka asked if the TIF District is approved. Goellner said yes. Baker referred to the swimming pool facing Highway 55 and said there shouldn't be site lines from the swimming pool to Highway 55. He also questioned what the green rectangular area shown on the plans is between the swimming pool and Highway 55. Waldhauser said she realizes that the developer was instructed by staff to remove a number of proposed trees placed in the right-of-way along Golden Valley Road, but she would like to see some trees on that side of the building. Minutes of the Golden Valley Planning Commission June 22, 2015 Page 10 Kluchka questioned if the applicant has a snow removal plan. Goellner said that snow storage won't be allowed to take away any required parking spaces and that it would have to be removed from the site. Kluchka suggested that be added as a condition of approval. Bill Stoddard, Applicant, explained the proposal to construct a market rate, 172 unit apartment building with a mix of alcove apartments, penthouses and townhome units. He said they will meet the stormwater requirements and will keep their water on-site. He discussed ways the building will be energy efficient including: being solar ready, water conservation efforts, a car2go hub, and moped parking. He stated that they are in agreement with staff's conditions, however they would like more time to review the Engineering staff's condition regarding shifting the west driveway as far west as feasible to better align with the driveway across the street. Burt Coffin, ESG Architects, discussed the public benefits of this project. He said they are tying this project into the neighborhoods to the east and west. He referred to a site plan and explained that the building will be 6 stories with parking both below grade and at grade. He stated that they want to tie into the proposed future sidewalk and added that the landscaping is a critical part of their proposal because they want to provide a landscape-rich environment with quality architecture on this highly visible site. He stated that the first floor will be brick with windows on all four sides and the main body of the building will be cementitious stucco with some lap siding and red corner highlights. He added that they are trying to activate the street front along Golden Valley Road as much as possible. He referred to the question about the green rectangular area shown on the plans and said that will be a dog walking area. Waldhauser stated that Golden Valley volunteer groups have done some landscaping along the Highway 55 MnDOT property and asked if there is a plan to do any maintenance of that area. Stoddard said yes, they plan to take the chain link fence down and maintain the area. He referred to the question regarding the swimming pool site lines and explained that the elevation of Highway 55 is much lower than their property. Kluchka asked if the name of the project will be changing since Golden Villas gives the impression of senior living, Traci Tomas, Golden Villas LLC, Applicant, explained that Golden Villas LLC is just the ownership and not the name of the building. She stated that they've been working with a marketing team and the name will be Hello. She said the concept is very friendly, welcoming, and unpretentious. Cera noted that the property is a gateway to Golden Valley so the name Hello makes sense. Kluchka asked about the snow removal plan. Tomas stated that they will do snow removal and haul snow off site as needed. Cera asked about the rental prices. Stoddard said they hope to appeal to a wide variety of people with rents ranging from $800 to over $2,000. Waldhauser asked about the rationale behind the location of the driveway that staff is recommending shifting further to the west. Coffin referred to a site plan and explained that Minutes of the Golden Valley Planning Commission June 22, 2015 Page 11 most of the traffic coming in the west entrance would go straight into the lower level parking. He said he understands it is important that vehicles and fire trucks have enough room to maneuver and that they would like to do a turn study to determine if is it possible keep the driveway in the location they've proposed. Baker referred to the applicant's presentation and asked what "solar ready" means. Stoddard explained that they will have conduit and the necessary items in place during construction and will be ready to install solar when necessary. Segelbaum asked about the elements being added to the project in order to contribute as part of the TIF financing. Stoddard stated that but for TIF they wouldn't be able to do this project. He discussed the changes in the Highway 55 slip ramp, the additional sidewalk being added to the north, the additional street lighting being added, and the other environmentally friendly benefits to the City other than the tax benefit. Waldhauser referred to the condition in the staff report regarding removal of the proposed trees within the right-of-way along Golden Valley and questioned if the City could install additional trees when it constructs the sidewalk to the north. She stated that she doesn't think this a practical recommendation by staff because the developer has no place else to put more trees along that side of the property. Kluchka asked about the construction schedule. Stoddard said they hope to break ground this fall. Johnson asked how the pedestrian connection would work to connect from the building to the public sidewalk. Stoddard said they are considering a painted/striped walkway. Johnson questioned how the sidewalk plan gets implemented. Tomas said it is similar to proof of parking. They will show the proposed sidewalk on their plans for future use and construction. Segelbaum opened the public hearing. Seeing and hearing no one wishing to comment, Segelbaum closed the public hearing. Cera asked why the proposed trees along Golden Valley Road would have to be relocated. Goellner stated that if the developer plants trees in the public right-of-way then the City would be responsible for maintenance. She suggested that a maintenance agreement might be able to be put in place between the developer and City to allow trees to be planted in the right-of-way. Kluchka suggested that requiring a neighborhood communication plan and a snow removal plan be added as conditions of approval. Segelbaum stated that maybe the developer's website could be used for communication. He asked the Commissioners if they would be willing to recommend softening the condition regarding the driveway alignment. Baker said he would like to leave that up to staff. Waldhauser said the proposal seems to work but if there is a safety issue, it should be addressed. Kluchka Minutes of the Golden Valley Planning Commission June 22, 2015 Page 12 suggested the Commission say that more investigation should be done before the proposal goes to the City Council for review. Cera said he is curious about the proposed tandem parking spaces. Segelbaum stated that the City is requiring that the tandem spaces belong to the same unit. Cera questioned if the tandem spaces are being proposed to meet the City's parking requirements and if they will really be used. Stoddard said they are fine with the staff's recommendation regarding the tandem parking spaces. Blum stated that this is a gateway location and it is good to see something attractive and interesting on this site. Segelbaum agreed. Kluchka said this is a good example of gateway design and he is happy about the proposed name. Cera said he is enthusiastic about the proposal and thinks it is a very attractive building. MOVED by Cera, seconded by Baker and motion carried unanimously to recommend approval of the Final PUD Plan for Golden Villas PUD No. 118, subject to the following findings and conditions: Findings: 1. The PUD plan is tailored to the specific characteristics of the site and achieves a higher quality of site planning and design than generally expected under conventional provisions of the ordinance. The applicant's use of a PUD has allowed the project to address various aspect of the site including its location along a busy State highway. 2. The PUD plan preserves and protects substantial desirable portions of the site's characteristics, open space and sensitive environmental features including steep slopes, trees, scenic views, creeks, wetlands, and open waters. The site is lacking open space or environmental features to preserve and protect. 3. The PUD plan includes efficient and effective use (which includes preservation) of the land. As a redevelopment of long vacant underutilized properties, the proposal would make better use of existing infrastructure and help the area transition into a more mixed use and pedestrian friendly environment. 4. The PUD Plan results in development compatible with adjacent uses and is consistent with the Comprehensive Plan and redevelopment plans and goals. The redevelopment of these two underutilized properties for multifamily housing is compatible with the medium density residential property to the north and is consistent with the goals of the Comprehensive Plan. 5. The PUD plan is consistent with preserving and improving the general health, safety and general welfare of the people of the City. By investing a long vacant property, this proposal helps rid the City of a blighted building, add value to the tax rolls, and provide new housing options for future residents. 6. The PUD plan meets the PUD Intent and Purpose provision and all other PUD ordinance provisions. Conditions: 1. The plans prepared by ESG Architects, submitted with the application on May 21, 2015, shall become a part of this approval. Minutes of the Golden Valley Planning Commission June 22, 2015 Page 13 2. The recommendations and requirements outlined in the memo from the Fire Department, dated June 15, 2015, shall become a part of this approval. 3. The recommendations and requirements outlined in the memo from the Engineering Division, dated June 16, 2015, shall become a part of this approval. 4. Both spaces in any tandem parking arrangement shall be assigned to the same unit. 5. All signage must meet the requirements of the City's Sign Code (Section 4.20). 6. The City Attorney will determine if a title review is necessary prior to approval of the Final Plat. 7. The Final Plat shall include "P.U.D. No. 118" in its title. 8. A park dedication fee of $33,600 (2% of the estimated land value) shall be paid prior to release of the Final Plat. 9. No snow shall be stored on site. 10. This approval is subject to all other state, federal, and local ordinances, regulations, or laws with authority over this development. --Sh rt Recess-- 4. Reports on Meetings of the Ho sing and Redevelopment Authority, City Council, Board of Zoning App als and other Meetings No ports were given. 5. her Business • M O Blue Line Extensi' n, S ion Area Planning Final Report No discussion wa eld. r" • Council Liaiso ep No report was given. v 6. Adjournme The meeting w adjourned 9:40 pm. i John Kluchka, Secretary Lisa Wittman, Administrative Assistant E 0 +OV CL r4 toz -Lz-q'und1VN1 . ............. .. ...... LCI) z t� F=:;l r-A cli gig Z cc � � � Q x 0,3 : 3 w 0 g...' LL 0 z 15 MMMMOINH M HAA W uj i AM w ail Cf) 1 z9; �,>Zv 2s r.M� uzy N o AGom ! GM.. 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Z p 'I I , i IF i1 c�3a YG , of el m 80l o 3 o A IE Q �w i _.N85.00 11H O�Z $ul �I I Io G I I a (D .W.,,...... Ig WNB i l g ROMA o I Im in I� Diw, W Z I I I a a wI 2z� � W I8 I JO r`zb�N I K 0 z99 L-___ 'i 196'942 eE Eoz _ 80594 M.4S9Z.00N I 1 I N 1 t I ,1 °d I ab Ke� 33 i I Uw 0^n m yg Z� O' I " / v3i3:m 'u I 00 ULj Od 9 , `z zW I WW ,� O W� h B nz d_ z°g I w3 m iI �; I 3u 3.s moos I ; M.4S.DZ.00N \ i. ...... ORDINANCE NO. 568, 2ND SERIES AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE CITY CODE Approval of Final Plan of Development Golden Villas P.U.D. No. 118 Golden Villas, LLC, Applicant The City Council for the City of Golden Valley hereby ordains as follows: Section 1. City Code Chapter 11 entitled "Land Use Regulations (Zoning)" is amended in Section 11.10, Subd. 2, and Section 11.55, by approving the Final Plan of Development for Planned Unit Development (P.U.D.) 118 thereby allowing the applicant to construct six story 172 unit apartment building with one level of underground parking at 9130 and 9220 Olson Memorial Highway. This PUD is subject to all of the terms of the permit to be issued including, but not limited to the following specific conditions: 1. The plans prepared by ESG Architects, submitted with the application on May 21, 2015, shall become a part of this approval. 2. The recommendations and requirements outlined in the memo from the Fire Department, dated June 15, 2015, shall become a part of this approval. 3. The recommendations and requirements outlined in the memo from the Engineering Division, dated June 16, 2015, shall become a part of this approval. 4. Both spaces in any tandem parking arrangement shall be assigned to the same unit. 5. No snow shall be stored on site. 6. All signage must meet the requirements of the City's Sign Code (Section 4.20). 7. The City Attorney will determine if a title review is necessary prior to approval of the Final Plat. 8. The Final Plat shall include "P.U.D. No. 118" in its title. 9. A park dedication fee of $33,600 (2% of the estimated land value) shall be paid prior to release of the Final Plat. 10.This approval is subject to all other state, federal, and local ordinances, regulations, or laws with authority over this development. In addition the Council makes the following findings pursuant to City Code Section 11.55, Subd. 6(Q): 1. The PUD plan is tailored to the specific characteristics of the site and achieves a higher quality of site planning and design than generally expected under conventional provisions of the ordinance. 2. The PUD plan preserves and protects substantial desirable portions of the site's characteristics, open space and sensitive environmental features including steep slopes, trees, scenic views, creeks, wetlands and open waters. 3. The PUD plan includes efficient and effective use (which includes preservation) of the land. 4. The PUD plan results in development compatible with adjacent uses and is consistent with the Comprehensive Plan and redevelopment plans and goals. Ordinance No. 568 - continued 5. The PUD plan is consistent with preserving and improving the general health, safety and general welfare of the people of the City. 6. The PUD plan meets the PUD Intent and Purpose provision and all other PUD ordinance provisions Section 2. The tract of land affected by this ordinance is legally described as follows: 9130 Olson Memorial Highway—West 211 14/100 feet of East 291 14/100 feet of that part of NW Y4 of SW 1/4 lying South of MPLS Watertown Road and North of State Highway No. 55 9220 Olson Memorial Highway — That part of NW 1/4 of SW 1/4 lying East of West 749 8/10 feet thereof and West of East 291.14 feet thereof North of State Highway No. 55 and South of Watertown Road Section 3. City Code Chapter 1 entitled "General Provisions and Definitions Applicable to the Entire City Code Including Penalty for Violation" and Sec. 11.99 entitled "Violation a Misdemeanor" are hereby adopted in their entirety, by reference, as though repeated verbatim herein. Section 4. This ordinance shall take effect from and after its passage and publication as required by law. Adopted by the City Council this 21St day of July, 2015. /s/Shepard M. Harris Shepard M. Harris, Mayor ATTEST: /s/Kristine A. Luedke Kristine A. Luedke, City Clerk city oy,oldef!, Ar M E M 0 R A N D U M Physical Development valley Department Y P 763-593-8095/763-593-8109(fax) Executive Summary For Action Golden Valley City Council Meeting July 21, 2015 60 day deadline:July 20, 2015 60 day extension: September 18, 2015 Agenda Item 4. D. Public Hearing- Final PUD Plan for Liberty Crossing PUD No. 123 - 7751-7775 Medicine Lake Road, 2430 and 2480 Winnetka Avenue North, 2485 Rhode Island Avenue North - Intuitive Investments, Applicant Prepared By Jason Zimmerman, Planning Manager Summary Intuitive Investments is seeking approval of a Planned Unit Development (PUD) to create a residential development consisting of a 184 unit apartment building and 63 townhomes in the southeast quadrant of the Medicine Lake Road and Winnetka Avenue North intersection. The proposal involves four lots, all containing existing structures-the VFW building at 7751-7775 Medicine Lake Road (3.0 acres), a car wash at 2485 Rhode Island Avenue North (0.88 acres), an Asian restaurant at 2480 Winnetka Avenue North (1.6 acres), and the vacant SIFCO building at 2430 Winnetka Avenue North (5.4 acres). In total, the land area of all four properties is 10.88 acres. The proposed apartment building would be located in the southeastern portion of the site and would be complemented by an outdoor pool, a dog run, a play area, and a community amenity building containing fitness equipment. The apartment building would be five stories above ground and one level below grade for parking. Four townhome buildings, each two stories and containing six units, would be located on the northernmost portion of the site, closest to Medicine Lake Road. Six additional two story townhome buildings, four containing four units and two containing six units, would be located on the westernmost portion of the site along Winnetka Avenue. To the south, five one story townhome buildings would containing 11 units. Access to the site would primarily be from Winnetka Avenue, with one drive serving the majority of the townhomes and the apartment building. Additional access to the apartment building, including to the underground parking entrance, would be off of Rhode Island Avenue in the southeast corner of the site. Under this proposal, direct access from Medicine Lake Road would be restricted to a right-in only in order to accommodate deliveries to Walgreens. Based on the parking requirements of the Zoning Code, 402 spaces are required. 465 spaces are proposed. At the June 22, 2015, Planning Commission meeting, the Commission voted 7-0 to recommend approval of the Final PUD Plan. Stormwater Management As outlined in more detail in the memo from the Engineering Division, management of stormwater for this project would be handled through an above ground pre-treatment and filtration basin, a newly constructed Swale, and a network of modular underground storage chambers. This system would not only manage water originating on-site, but, through a partnership with the City, would help capture large amounts of water that currently cause flooding issues along Medicine Lake Road and in the DeCola Ponds area. Water moving southeast from Medicine Lake Road would be diverted through the construction of an open swale into DeCola Pond B. When water levels reach a critical depth,the overflow would be diverted into the underground storage chambers on the subject property and would be released gradually over a period of time as water in the DeCola Pond system lowers. The construction of the swale would necessitate the removal of a portion of Rhode Island Avenue south of the entrance to Dover Hills and north of the entrance to the site and the new apartment building. The creation of this new green space not only enhances the apartment building, but removes existing impervious surfaces and provides a direct link from the site to Pennsylvania Woods and the existing trails. Comparison to Preliminary PUD Plan Based on review from Hennepin County, the Final PUD Plans have been modified to remove one point of access on Winnetka Avenue and to allow for one right-in only point of access from Medicine Lake Road. At the request of the Planning Commission, the City's consulting traffic engineer reviewed the plans and is in agreement that the removal of the southern access point on Winnetka will be beneficial. The remaining access point to the north is positioned near the high point in the hill and will provide for better visibility. Additional pedestrian connections, including a proposed trail along the east side of the property, have been added to the Final Plan. Detailed elevations, which were not provided as part of the Preliminary PUD Plan, are now included. Findings and Conditions City Code establishes standards for PUDs, which are laid out in the Staff report to the Planning Commission. In addition, City Code establishes findings that must be made by the City when creating a PUD. The Council makes the following findings pursuant to City Code Section 11.55, Subd. 6(Q): 1. Quality Site Planning. The PUD plan is tailored to the specific characteristics of the site and achieves a higher quality of site planning and design than generally expected under conventional provisions of the ordinance. The applicant worked closely with the City during a lengthy pre-application process-and has continued to refine the proposal-in order to accommodate the unique circumstances surrounding the site. The flexibility allowed under a PUD is necessary to achieve the outcome that will not only benefit the applicant, but the City as a whole. Staff believes this standard has been met. 2. Preservation. The PUD plan preserves and protects substantial desirable portions of the site's characteristics, open space and sensitive environmental features including steep slopes, trees, scenic views, creeks, wetlands, and open waters. Given the lack of open space or other sensitive environmental features on the site today, there is little available for the applicant to preserve. However, the proposal does take advantage of the natural areas of Pennsylvania Woods and DeCola Pond B to the east and, in partnership with the City, will use a constructed swale to manage stormwater more effectively and result in the creation of additional green space within in the Rhode Island Avenue right of way. Staff believes this standard has been met. 3. Efficient- Effective. The PUD plan includes efficient and effective use (which includes preservation) of the land. The proposal not only provides for an increase in residential density in an underutilized area well served by transit, but the creative inclusion of regional flood storage within the development provides a benefit to the greater area. Staff believes this standard has been met. 4. Compatibility. The PUD Plan results in development compatible with adjacent uses and is consistent with the Comprehensive Plan and redevelopment plans and goals. The use of this property for higher density residential use is compatible with the neighboring property to the east and the density being proposed is consistent with the City's revised Comprehensive Plan. Staff believes this standard has been met. 5. General Health. The PUD plan is consistent with preserving and improving the general health, safety and general welfare of the people of the City. The potential for reduction in flooding along Medicine Lake Road and within the DeCola Ponds area provides great benefit to the City and its residents. Staff believes this standard has been met. 6. Meets Requirements. The PUD plan meets the PUD Intent and Purpose provision and all other PUD ordinance provisions. The flexibility provided by the PUD allows for a better site layout and coordination between the two uses on the site. Staff believes this standard has been met. Staff recommends approval of the Final PUD Plan subject to the following conditions: 1. The plans prepared by Tanek, submitted May 21 and June 8, 2015, shall become a part of this approval. 2. The recommendations and requirements outlined in the memo from the Fire Department, dated June 15, 2015, shall become a part of this approval. 3. The recommendations and requirements outlined in the memo from the Engineering Division, dated June 18, 2015, shall become a part of this approval. 4. Public bicycle racks or similar facilities for the parking/storage of a minimum of 14 bicycles shall be provided, based on a calculation of 5% of the 276 parking spaces required for the apartment building. 5. All signage must meet the requirements of the City's Sign Code (Section 4.20). 6. The City Attorney will determine if a title review is necessary prior to approval of the Final Plat. 7. The Final Plat shall include "P.U.D. No. 123" in its title. 8. A park dedication fee of$60,100, or 2% of the land value, shall be paid before release of the Final Plat. 9. A neighborhood communications plan regarding the construction schedule must be established prior to issuance of a building permit. 10. This approval is subject to all other state, federal, and local ordinances, regulations, or laws with authority over this development. Attachments • Location Map (1 page) • Applicant's Narrative and Development Information (10 pages) • Memo to the Planning Commission dated June 22, 2015 (8 pages) • Memo from the Fire Department dated June 15, 2015 (3 pages) • Memo from the Engineering Division dated June 18, 2015 (7 pages) • Unapproved Planning Commission Minutes dated June 22, 2015 (8 pages) • Email from Kenneth Pronovici dated May 28, 2015 (1 page) • Plans from Tanek Architecture submitted May 21 and June 8, 2015 (31 pages) • Ordinance#569, Approval of Final Plan of Development, Liberty Crossing No. 123 (2 pages) Recommended Action Motion to adopt Ordinance #569, Approval of Final PUD Plan, Liberty Crossing PUD No. 123, Intuitive Investments, Applicant. W LpJ -- I QUEBE C rr�o�w uor..�u�r•MfO�Cltlf ldkf Rd n�n�u�o�n�w�r.�,rr�norsu�w�a�uwr.�u�rrrru�..�u�u�«�«�u�w-rrrr�n�..�a�w�n�m 550 81796139 8101 �� 8181 • 22 2 2526 8025 2175 259222252524'- 222246 2500 8140 1 8100 0 �'151A 8 ,224/8-^ 25485625W t,8 `.7S 2508; 2 246 `-- Subject Properties: 2552 4 X15250610 7 45 X554 2511 2 48 6 2876 SIA' 25tt1 Ave N 8159 8101 2480 2500 a5�2562 2504 14, 2465 1445 2568 2500 24124180 j4 ^ 2400 24/24182 2424 2400 2405 2440 2445 2450 2420 24222 405 > = 101 2440 •y 1G J12400 2350 2385 L Q 21 /1011101 8040 8020 2425 >r 0j 2400 a 319 705 2360 2365 _� 2415 519 719 716 Jonelien In y O p 2355 2340 2345 80458015 5005 t 7979 2409 1335 2320 8100 8040 6020 8000 .315\ 7960 2337 2 =�(•• .yy�, Wynnwood Rd Q �=iT 8155-r-- "! 8135 8105 8045 6015 Z 2315 2320 2325 • -- .° 2300 t 2300 ' 200 618 0 6140 8100 6040 8020 8000 3 I I • " Pennsylvalxa Y/ —_ _lam 2301 y 23rd Ave N P2255 2250 2255 2 2250 7955 79257901 765376337631t INi 2220 2225Q 2120 785122509 s`t 2202 �IlkMr Y 200 2205 2x00 79601I79467920-2 205 ay�s.�� _a s- Kiz - !�k •z ��IK, - 2205 t S I n 2200 st�ye_ "= i�ie:�liYr: ,,. Liberty Crossing Development : Final PUD Application — City of Golden Valley ` ' 5-21-2015 kJ Narrative Description of the Development— PUD Provisions a) The Liberty Crossing PUD development encourages, preserves and improves the health, safety and general welfare of the people of the City by encouraging the use of contemporary land planning principles. Liberty Crossing is working with the Golden Valley Engineering Department to mitigate storm water flooding in this area of Golden Valley. This effort will improve the health, safety and general welfare of the residents of Golden Valley. In addition the redevelopment will improve the current level of water quality and storm water management on this 10 acre site. b) The Liberty Crossing PUD development achieves a high quality of site planning, design, landscaping and building materials which are compatible with the existing and planned land use. The Liberty Crossing site and land use plan will deliver high quality, best practices site planning and design, landscaping and building materials to the development. c) The Liberty Crossing PUD development encourages preservation and protection of desirable site characteristics and open space and protection of sensitive environmental features including steep slopes, trees, scenic views, water ways, wetlands and lakes. The development will provide new storm water management improvements that will enhance and protect the Decola Pond system in Golden Valley as well as the surrounding properties and infrastructure. d) The Liberty Crossing PUD development encourages construction of affordable housing and a variety of housing types. Liberty Crossing will provide a wide variety of including affordable rental properties to Golden Valley. The combination of rental apartments, one story and two story townhomes will also provide housing for a large demographic of the population. e) The Liberty Crossing PUD development encourages creativity and flexibility in land development. The development includes a variety of land development techniques and uses on this site. This development includes low density and high density residential properties as well as creating open space and increasing the existing green space on the site. f) The Liberty Crossing PUD development encourages efficient and effective use of land, open space, streets, utilities and other public features. The redevelopment will remove older obsolete buildings on the property which include the existing land, open space, streets and tultites. The new buildings will include the most current practices in design and construction to provide efficiency and sustainability in design and construction. g) The Liberty Crossing PUD development allows mixing land uses and assembly and development of land to form larger parcels. Currently the development consists of four separate land parcels. The PUD will allow the developer to combine the parcels into a larger parcel and provide both low density and high density residential uses. h) The Liberty Crossing PUD development encourages development in transitional areas which achieve compatibility with all adjacent and nearby land uses. The Liberty Crossing surrounding area and properties is largely mixed use including single family, multi family, industrial, retail and institutional uses. The proposed low density and high density uses at Liberty Crossing will prove very compatible to the surrounding uses. i) The Liberty Crossing PUD development achieves development consistent with the Comprehensive Plan. The City of Golden Valley has already reviewed and approved a revision to their Comprehensive Plan for the Liberty Crossing use. The Met Council is considering a similar approval in the very near future. j) The Liberty Crossing PUD development achieves development consistent with the City's redevelopment plans and goals. The development will provide a significant upgrade to the northwest corner of Golden Valley by removing four old structures which are currently underutilized properties. The new development will provide 247 units of housing for approximately 370 to 425 residents that will positively impact the City of Golden Valley including the surrounding neighborhoods and businesses. k) The Liberty Crossing PUD development encourages development that is sustainable and has a high degree of energy efficiency. The new residential buildings constructed at Liberty Crossing will be state of the art in both green design and include efficient materials during construction and in ongoing property operations. Liberty Crossing Development Final PUD Application — City of Golden Valley f 5-21-2015r. Project Amenities The Liberty Crossing development contains 184 units of rental apartment and 63 units of rental town house housing for a total of 247 housing units. Based on the current project design the development will provide the following amenities: Interior Amenities: • Enclosed underground parking • Enclosed trash & recycling • Enclosed bike repair & storage space • Common area lounge & seating space for residents • On site property managers office • Tenant storage on each floor level • Wi-Fi & coffee lounge for residents Exterior Amenities: • Heavily landscaped site • Free standing community room/clubhouse including, Fitness room Leasing offices Children's play room Women's & men's locker rooms Community space & resident lounge/seating • Exterior swimming pool & amenity deck • Enclosed resident parking in town home buildings • Dog park/run area • Resident play area and BBQ area • On street parking stalls • Internal sidewalks for resident & neighborhood circulation Liberty Crossing Development Final PUD Application — City of Golden Valley 5-21-2015 Refuse and Garbage Plan The Liberty Crossing development contains 184 units of rental apartment and 63 units of rental town home housing for a total of 247 housing units. Based on the current project design the apartment building will collect its garbage waste via an interior trash chute located in a trash room on each floor of the building which will collect all trash in dumpsters located in an enclosed room in the basement of the apartment building. The dumpsters will be rolled out of the building basement on trash collection day. When emptied by the trash service contractor the dumpsters will be promptly placed back in the basement trash room of the apartment building by property staff. Recycling will be collected in each trash room on each floor and moved to the basement trash room as needed. The recycling will be also collected by a third party. Each townhome has an enclosed parking stall where the resident will store both their trash cart and their recycling cart. On the designated trash day each townhouse resident will be responsible for bringing their trash cart and recycling cart to the curbside of their townhouse for collection. It will be the resident's responsibility to replace their trash and recycling carts in their garages. Fv>, O LOV1 o O d' W Or4 r, N tD O'1 l0 coci V N N 1� 't - 00 LL -1-1 ^ -* -1.1 ^ V M O N ~ N N r- V V .-1 N N Lf) 1- O M W N Lq V1 LL � o IV N d a J M O1 O �D (N O Y) C14 z N W C O J O 0 � W Z CL W O � J W oG 0 0 z w a H > >> > O N GJ J J Y m Co m L L Y Y m E E E m m Ln V'f O O O O ry O O O \ \ � e ami v v o o E E m m m 0 0 0 0 G C of •--4 N M 'DO 'DO Y Gl C/ Y Y Y m mWW m m E C C C N N M E E E a, w " G t t t 7 O vOi vOi Q3 m Q m t L O O Q Q Q 3 3 c c 0 F0 FO- N f a Liberty Crossing Development Final PUD Application — City of Golden Valley 5-21-2015 r► Life Cycle and Affordable Housing Narrative. The Liberty Crossing development contains 184 units of rental apartment and 63 units of rental town house housing. The Liberty Crossing development does not include any units that are officially designated as Affordable Housing but the creation of a wide variety of unit types in a single development will create housing options that will be considered by future residents to be a very good value. The Liberty Crossing development does not include any units that are officially designated as Life Cycle Housing but the creation of a wide variety of unit types within a large supportive residential community will provide housing options that will appeal and be occupied by residents of a wide demographic and a wide level of independence. Liberty Crossing Development Final PUD Application — City of Golden Valley ;- 5-21-2015 Population Estimate The Liberty Crossing development contains 184 units of rental apartment and 63 units of rental town house housing for a total of 247 housing units. The general standard in the multi family industry is that 1.5 persons typically occupy one residential unit in a mutli family property. If that standard is applied to the Liberty Crossing development then when fully occupied the property would expect to contain approximately 371 residents. f?, Liberty Crossing Development Final PUD Application — City of Golden Valley 5-21-2015 Number of Employees The Liberty Crossing development contains 184 units of rental apartment and 63 units of rental town house housing for a total of 247 housing units. When completed and fully occupied Liberty Crossing is expected to have the following employment base: 1) 1 — On site property manager employee 2) 1 — On site maintenance person employee 3) 3 — On site caretaker persons employees 4) 1 — On site marketing person employee In addition the completed development will have numerous third party service contracts that will indirectly increase the employment base of the third party service providers. 4 LIBERTY CROSSING DEVELOPMENT SCHEDULE r E 5/21/2015 r' Start Complete Land Acquisition:Sifco November 2014 January 2015 Land Acquisition:VFW November 2014 August 2015 Land Acquisition: Restaurant November 2014 August 2015 Land Acquisition: Car Wash November 2014 August 2015 City Entitlements: March 2015 to August 2015 Design Plans January 2015 August 2015 Building Demolition September 2015 October 2015 Construction-Apartments November 2015 February 2017 Construction-Townhomes April 2016 September 2016 Leasing and Occupancy-Apartments Febraury 2017 Leasing and Occupancy-Townhomes September 2016 Liberty Crossing Development Final PUD Application — City of Golden Valley 5-21-2015 Schedule - Project The Liberty Crossing development contains 184 units of rental apartment and 63 units of rental town house housing for a total of 247 housing units. Based on the current City of Golden Valley entitlement schedule and the planned project financing schedule the timeline should be as follows: City Approvals Completed — July 2015 Closing on three of four land parcels —August 2015 Closing of project financing — October/November 2015 Demolition of four existing buildings — October/November 2015 Start of construction — apartment building (one) — November 2015 Start of town house buildings (15 total) —April 2016 Completion of town house buildings (15 total) — September 2016 First occupancy of town house buildings (15 total) — October 2016 Completion of apartment building (1) — January/February 2017 First occupancy of apartment building (1) — February 2017 Cite 0f MR AN DU M goldcnIV7,l 1 Physical Develo Development Department valley pP 763-593-8095/763-593-8109(fax) Date: June 22, 2015 To: Golden Valley Planning Commission From: Jason Zimmerman, Planning Manager Subject: Informal Public Hearing–Final PUD Plan for Liberty Crossing PUD No. 123 –7751- 7775 Medicine Lake Road, 2430 and 2480 Winnetka Avenue North, 2485 Rhode Island Avenue North– Intuitive Investments, Applicant Background Intuitive Investments is seeking approval of a Planned Unit Development (PUD)to create a residential development consisting of a 184 unit apartment building and 63 townhomes in the southeast quadrant of the Medicine Lake Road and Winnetka Avenue North intersection. The proposal involves four lots, all containing existing structures—the VFW building at 7751-7775 Medicine Lake Road (3.0 acres), a car wash at 2485 Rhode Island Avenue North (0.88 acres), an Asian restaurant at 2480 Winnetka Avenue North (1.6 acres), and the vacant SIFCO building at 2430 Winnetka Avenue North (5.4 acres). In total, the land area of all four properties is 10.88 acres. In the northwest corner of the block,the Walgreens, Dairy Queen, and Midland Auto buildings would all remain. To the south,the public storage buildings would also remain. Surrounding the site are single family homes to the west (across Winnetka),the public storage site to the south, commercial and multi-family residential uses to the north (across Medicine Lake Road in New Hope), and multi-family residential and open space to the east (across Rhode Island) in the form of the Dover Hills Apartments, Pennsylvania Woods, and DeCola Pond B. Currently, the site can be accessed via two driveways on Winnetka,two driveways on Rhode Island, and two driveways on Medicine Lake Road. In addition, a narrow right-of-way extends from the VFW site to Winnetka to the west. On December 2, 2014, the City Council approved re-designating these properties as High Density Residential on the General Land Use Plan Map. The Metropolitan Council approved the re- designation and on May 5, 2015, these properties were rezoned to High Density Residential (R-4). 1 7751-75 V AR �y CO OD -8035 2542 LO q0 $�p0 Cli 2486 2476 xa ti a 2564 2520 .. � 2458 o 00 2500 39 81p1 1 7-0 g � N C� 2414 2436 N O CD A 2p(�tJ Zggp ZgAS 2�'`p 0 J Z0 O O N Z� OD CD 2400 V O Q N N M CD N O 102 rn 0) _ � o lbf N N! 2337 p a �`' oh o o `" ,•. 2�2� 232 N W <b N 1 O CO -w OPP �p 7955 7925 2240 9D m 2) m 2220 Proposed PUD 123 - Site Map Summary of Proposal The proposed PUD would allow for the consolidation of the properties and the construction of a 184 unit apartment building and 15 townhome buildings containing 63 units. The apartment building would be located in the southeastern portion of the site and would be complemented by an outdoor pool, a dog run, a play area, and a community amenity building containing fitness equipment. The apartment building would be five stories above ground and one level below grade for parking. Four townhome buildings, each two stories and containing six units, would be located on the northernmost portion of the site, closest to Medicine Lake Road. Six additional two story townhome buildings, four containing four units and two containing six units, would be located on the westernmost portion of the site along Winnetka Avenue. To the south, five one story townhome buildings would containing 11 units. Access to the site would primarily be from Winnetka Avenue, with one drive serving the majority of the townhomes and the apartment building. Additional access to the apartment building, including to the underground parking entrance, would be off of Rhode Island Avenue in the southeast corner of the site. Under this proposal, direct access from Medicine Lake Road would be restricted to a right-in only in order to accommodate deliveries to Walgreens. 2 -WORE 51 AND AVENIE NORN 41 North Proposed Site Layout The underground parking level of the apartment building would provide 232 stalls. A surface parking area in front of the building would provide another 56 spaces for a total of 288 spaces. Based on the parking requirements of the Zoning Code, 276 spaces are required. All but five of the townhome units would have garage space for two cars; five of the townhome units would have garage space for one car. In addition, 17 driveway spaces would be provided for the 11 one story townhomes for a total of 138 parking spaces. Based on the parking requirements of the Zoning Code, 126 spaces are required. 39 additional parking spaces would be available along the internal street network. Existing sidewalks along Winnetka and Medicine Lake Road would be preserved, and a new internal sidewalk network would be added to move pedestrians through the site. A new north-south trail is proposed along the east side of the development to provide connections to the existing trails in Pennsylvania Woods. Per the Zoning Code, bicycle racks or a similar facility must be available to the public at a rate of 5% of the required vehicle parking. Based on the 184 apartment units and 276 vehicle spaces required, 14 public bicycle spaces must be provided. Comparison to Preliminary PUD Plans Based on review from Hennepin County, the Final PUD Plans have been modified to remove one point of access on Winnetka Avenue and to allow for one right-in only point of access from Medicine Lake Road. At the request of the Planning Commission, the City's consulting traffic 3 engineer reviewed the plans and is in agreement that the removal of the southern access point on Winnetka will be beneficial. The remaining access point to the north is positioned near the high point in the hill and will provide for better visibility. Additional pedestrian connections, including a proposed trail along the east side of the property, have been added to the Final Plan. Detailed elevations, which were not provided as part of the Preliminary PUD Plan, are now included. Land Use and Zoning Considerations As a PUD, the City can offer flexibility from the regular zoning requirements in order to achieve a better development. The following table summarizes how closely the requirements of the R-4 High Density Residential Zoning District are met under the current proposal: R-4 High Density Residential Liberty Crossing PUD 123 Use Multiple-family dwellings Apartment and townhomes Dimensional Standards Minimum lot area 20,000 square feet for any Total site area over 473,000 principal structure square feet; largest lot at 160,229 — smallest at 1,608 Minimum lot width at front 150' Greater than 290' setback line Structure coverage 45% maximum 25.4% Impervious coverage 60% maximum 61.9% Front setback 25' 25' along Winnetka, 28' along Rhode Island, 40' along Medicine Lake Road Side setback 20' 47' along Walgreens property Rear setback 20' 22' along south property line Accessory structures Includes private indoor and Pool, play area, and outdoor recreation facilities clubhouse/fitness building Parking for 184 apartment units 1.5 spaces per dwelling unit 1276 288 Parking for 63 townhome units 2 spaces per dwelling unit 126 138 with at least 1 enclosed 39 additional parking spaces provided along internal street network The site will be divided into 65 individual lots, including 63 townhome lots and a large lot containing the apartment building. All remaining property, primarily consisting of circulation and parking areas, will be combined into one lot. 4 Although the amount of impervious coverage is slightly higher than what would be allowed under the typical R-4 zoning designation, the amount of impervious coverage is actually a reduction from the existing conditions. In addition, the innovative storm water management system being proposed in partnership with the City (see below) will result in the removal of a portion of Rhode Island Avenue to the east, increasing the amount of pervious surfaces in the area even further. PUD Standards and Guidelines There are a handful of standards and guidelines set within Section 11.55 of the City Code that regulate PUDs. The following table summarizes how closely the requirements of this section are met under the current proposal: Planned Unit Developments Liberty Crossing PUD 123 Lot size No minimum NA Frontage 100' or adequate to serve the Greater than 290' development Principal building setbacks No closer than its height to NA the rear or side property line of a single-family district All building setbacks No closer than 15' from the Meets requirements back of curb along internal roadway systems Private service facilities or Operation and maintenance Will be included as part of common areas agreements required Development Agreements Stormwater Management As outlined in more detail in the memo from the Engineering Division, management of stormwater for this project would be handled both through an above ground pre-treatment and filtration basin but also through a network of modular underground storage chambers. This system would not only manage water originating on-site, but, through a partnership with the City, would help capture large amounts of water that currently cause flooding issues along Medicine Lake Road and in the DeCola Ponds area. Water moving southeast from Medicine Lake Road would be diverted through the construction of an open swale into DeCola Pond B. When water levels reach a critical depth, the overflow would be diverted into the underground storage chambers on the subject property and would be released gradually over a period of time as water in the DeCola Pond system lowers. The construction of the swale would necessitate the removal of a portion of Rhode Island Avenue south of the entrance to Dover Hills and north of the entrance to the site and the new apartment building. The creation of this new green space not only enhances the apartment building, but removes existing impervious surfaces and provides a direct link from the site to Pennsylvania Woods and the existing trails. 5 Engineering and Fire Safety Considerations As is standard practice for development proposals, plans for this proposal were reviewed by the City's Engineering Division to ensure the site can be adequately served by public utilities. A memorandum from the Engineering Division that addresses flood mitigation, access and circulation, pedestrian facilities, sanitary sewer and water services, inflow and infiltration, stormwater management, and tree preservation is attached. The Fire Department reviewed this proposal to ensure that adequate emergency vehicle access is achieved on the site. A memorandum from the Fire Department that addresses site access, site design, and water supply is attached. Anticipated Development Timeline The applicant has completed the purchase of the SIFCO site and anticipates completing the purchases of the other properties in early summer of 2015. Upon final approval of the PUD in the late summer, demolition of the existing buildings could proceed in the fall, beginning with the SIFCO property. It is anticipated that site work and construction of the underground parking level of the apartment building could take place in November, with additional work on the apartment building continuing throughout the winter and into 2106. Working with the City, the underground storage could be installed early in 2016 with construction of the townhomes taking place soon afterwards. Leasing for the apartment and townhomes could happen as early as late 2016. Justification for Consideration as a PUD The PUD process is an optional method of regulating land use in order to permit flexibility in uses allowed, setbacks, height, parking requirements, and number of buildings on a lot. Applications for PUDs must be consistent with the Intent and Purpose provisions and the PUD requirements and principles and standards adhered to in the City. In order to be approved as a PUD, the City must be able to make the following findings: 1. Quality Site Planning. The PUD plan is tailored to the specific characteristics of the site and achieves a higher quality of site planning and design than generally expected under conventional provisions of the ordinance. The applicant worked closely with the City during a lengthy pre-application process—and has continued to refine the proposal—in order to accommodate the unique circumstances surrounding the site. The flexibility allowed under a PUD is necessary to achieve the outcome that will not only benefit the applicant, but the City as a whole. Staff believes this standard has been met. 2. Preservation. The PUD plan preserves and protects substantial desirable portions of the site's characteristics, open space and sensitive environmental features including steep slopes, trees, scenic views, creeks, wetlands, and open waters. Given the lack of open space or other sensitive environmental features on the site today, there is little available for the applicant to preserve. However,the proposal does take advantage of the natural areas of Pennsylvania Woods and DeCola Pond B to the east and, in partnership with the City, will use a constructed 6 Swale to manage stormwater more effectively and result in the creation of additional green space within in the Rhode Island Avenue right of way. Staff believes this standard has been met. 3. Efficient—Effective. The PUD plan includes efficient and effective use (which includes preservation) of the land. The proposal not only provides for an increase in residential density in an underutilized area well served by transit, but the creative inclusion of regional flood storage within the development provides a benefit to the greater area. Staff believes this standard has been met. 4. Compatibility. The PUD Plan results in development compatible with adjacent uses and is consistent with the Comprehensive Plan and redevelopment plans and goals. The use of this property for higher density residential use is compatible with the neighboring property to the east and the density being proposed is consistent with the City's revised Comprehensive Plan. Staff believes this standard has been met. 5. General Health. The PUD plan is consistent with preserving and improving the general health, safety and general welfare of the people of the City. The potential for reduction in flooding along Medicine Lake Road and within the DeCola Ponds area provides great benefit to the City and its residents. Staff believes this standard has been met. 6. Meets Requirements. The PUD plan meets the PUD Intent and Purpose provision and all other PUD ordinance provisions. The flexibility provided by the PUD allows for a better site layout and coordination between the two uses on the site. Staff believes this standard has been met. Recommendation Staff recommends approval of the Final Plan for Liberty Crossing PUD No. 123, subject to the following conditions: 1. The plans prepared by Tanek, submitted May 21 and June 8, 2015, shall become a part of this approval. 2. The recommendations and requirements outlined in the memo from the Fire Department, dated June 15, 2015, shall become a part of this approval. 3. The recommendations and requirements outlined in the memo from the Engineering Division, dated June 18, 2015, shall become a part of this approval. 4. Public bicycle racks or similar facilities for the parking/storage of a minimum of 14 bicycles shall be provided, based on a calculation of 5%of the 276 parking spaces required for the apartment building. 5. All signage must meet the requirements of the City's Sign Code (Section 4.20). 6. The City Attorney will determine if a title review is necessary prior to approval of the Final Plat. 7. The Final Plat shall include "P.U.D. No. 123" in its title. 8. A park dedication fee of$60,100, or 2%of the land value, shall be paid before release of the Final Plat. 9. This approval is subject to all other state,federal, and local ordinances, regulations, or laws with authority over this development. 7 Attachments Location Map (1 page) Applicant's Narrative and Development Information (10 pages) Memo from the Fire Department dated June 15, 2015 (3 pages) Memo from the Engineering Division dated June 18, 2015 (7 pages) Email from Kenneth Pronovici dated May 28, 2015 Plans from Tanek Architecture submitted May 21 and June 8, 2015 (31 pages) 8 (TO CI;I 4r v . ey sire Department ,. 763-593-8079/ 763-593-8098 (fax) Date: June 15, 2015 To: Jason Zimmerman, Planning Manager From: John Crelly, Fire Chief Subject: Final PUD#123 for Liberty Crossings The Golden Valley Fire Department has reviewed the final PUD plans that were submitted on May 21, 2015 and the additional revised drawings submitted on June 8, 2015 for Liberty Crossings. This final PUD application proposes the removal of 4 existing structures and the construction of a 6 story apartment building, a clubhouse/fitness center and a variety of 63 single-story and two-story townhouses grouped in clusters of either 2, 3, 4 or 6 units. SITE ACCESS The current proposal has 3 points of access to public streets. One entrance off of Rhode Island Avenue from the south, one entrance off of Winnetka Avenue and one entrance off Medicine Lake Road. All private roads on site are designed with a minimum width of between 26 %feet to 30 feet. The plans shows truck movements throughout the site confirming that a minimum road width and a 45 foot turning radius will accommodate larger trucks as required by the Minnesota State Fire Code (MSFC). Based on the vehicle movements, ALL personal vehicle parking will need to in designated parking stalls as shown on the plan. Nose in parking in front of the two-story townhouse that face each other will not be allowed due to the limited road width / limit space in front of the garages. Areas that are not designated parking will need to be properly identified with yellow painted curbing and signage as required by MSFC. The owner agreed to this in an email from Tom Dillon dated June 1, 2015 at 3:29 pm. The plans do not give specifics on what standard the roads will be constructed to. Minnesota State Fire Code (MSFC) section 503.2.3 states: "Fire apparatus access roads shall be designed and maintained to support the imposed loads of fire apparatus and shall be surfaced so as to provide all-weather driving capabilities". The owner agreed to this in an email from Tom Dillon dated June 8, 2015 at 12:58 pm. Pagel of 3 of the fire department connection. City and private fire hydrants may be used when determining the 100 feet distance. The layout of water mains throughout the development consists of a network of 8-inch piping with two connections to City mains. One to the water main on Rhode Island Avenue North and the other connection to a water main on Winnetka Avenue North. There is a total of 10 fire hydrants throughout the development. Sectional control valves have been added on revised drawings. Final review and approval is required and the owner has agreed to this in an email from Tom Dillon dated June 1, 2015 at 3:29 pm. SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS The 7 conditions listed in the preliminary PUD have been addressed in the revised drawings and /or agreed to in various e-mails as noted above. Staff recommends approval of the final PUD. If you have any questions, please contact me at 763-593-8065, or e-mail jcrelly@goldenvalleymn.gov v c cv Physical Development Department 763-593-8030/763-593-3988(fax) Date: June 18, 2015 To: Jason Zimmerman, Planning Manager From: Jeff Oliver, PE, City Engineer Eric Eckman, Public Works Specialist Subject: Liberty Crossing PUD #123—Final PUD Review Engineering staff has reviewed the plans for the proposed Liberty Crossing planned unit development (PUD), submitted by Intuitive Investments (Developer). The proposed PUD is located between Winnetka Avenue and Rhode Island Avenue, immediately south of Medicine Lake Road. The PUD is approximately 10.8 acres and is comprised of four existing commercial properties. The proposed redevelopment of the site includes the construction of a 184-unit apartment building, 63 townhomes and a community building with an outdoor pool. This memorandum discusses the items identified during the Engineering review that must be addressed prior to final plat approval. The comments contained in this review are based on the plans submitted to the City on May 21, 2015, and revised June 8, 2015. Site Plan The proposed PUD includes the demolition of four existing commercial properties and the construction of new apartments and townhomes. The five-story apartment building will be generally located in the southeast portion of the site and will include one level of underground parking beneath the apartment property. The townhomes will be distributed around the site to include the following: 24 units located in the north portion of the site; 28 units in the west portion of the site; and 11 units located along the south boundary of the PUD. As part of the proposed PUD, the four commercial buildings will be demolished to make way for the redevelopment. The Developer must obtain the appropriate City permits for demolition of the existing buildings, and removal of all utilities, pavements, and other related infrastructure. As discussed in the preliminary review, the portion of the PUD located near the intersection of Medicine Lake Road and Rhode Island Avenue experiences significant flooding during large precipitation events. The cities of Golden Valley, New Hope, and Crystal have been studying this area as part of the Medicine Lake Road and Winnetka Avenue Area Long Term Flood Mitigation Study. As such, the Developer has been working with the City to ensure that the proposed PUD is G:\Developments-Private\Liberty Crossing\Memos\Liberty FinaiPUD_ReviewO61515.docx constructed to meet flood protection elevations, while mitigating any potential flood impacts that may result from the development. Staff has the following comments regarding the flood mitigation efforts: 1. The Developer must continue to work with the City on the design details of the flood storage areas (underground tank, flood storage Swale) in order to maximize the long term flood mitigation efforts within the subwatershed. 2. In the final construction drawings, the Developer must reference the vertical datum used during survey and design (NAVD88) and account for the difference between that datum and the datum used by the City during its flood study (NGVD29).This must be reflected in the low floor and low opening elevations of structures and also in the calculations of proposed fill volumes. 3. The flood storage swale (900 feet mean sea level elevation) may need to be extended west along Medicine Lake Road to the low point overflow from the street. This can be shown on the Developer's final construction drawings once the flood storage design has been further refined. 4. In the southeast corner of the PUD the plans show areas of proposed fill within the right- of-way of Rhode Island Avenue. The City has identified this area as having potential for excavation and creation of flood storage, and therefore no fill is allowed in this area. 5. As plans for the underground flood storage tank are developed, the maintenance access and other maintenance needs will become more evident. This will likely include working with the Developer to ensure that the trails and walks proposed on top of the tank are constructed to allow for maintenance access, and that an adequate number of access points are included in the design. 6. The Developer must remove all trees proposed within the footprint of the flood storage areas. Shrubs, perennials, and grasses may be acceptable in certain locations due to their smaller root structure, however those details will not be known until the overall design is further refined. The City will continue to work with the Developer on these details as the project progresses. The site plan submitted by the Developer includes a significant number of sidewalks for internal circulation, as well as a future north-south trail connecting the Pennsylvania Woods Nature Area to the sidewalk along Medicine Lake Road. The Developer must continue to work with the City on the alignment and design of the north-south trail as plans for the flood storage areas are further developed. Depending on the final design of the flood storage areas, the north-south trail will likely be used as a maintenance access and therefore would need to be designed accordingly (as discussed above in item 4). It is anticipated that the north-south trail will be used by the public and therefore the Developer must dedicate permanent walkway easements to the City. The sidewalks along Winnetka Avenue and Medicine Lake are owned and maintained by the City and therefore must be fully reconstructed, adjacent to this PUD, to meet City standards and ADA guidelines, including the construction of accessible curb ramps at all intersections with driveways. Construction details will be discussed further with the Developer during the Right-of-Way permitting process. &\Developments-Private\Liberty Cross ing\Memos\Liberty_Fin aIPUD_Review061515.docx The Developer must submit financial securities for the construction of public trails and sidewalks, the details of which will be outlined in the development agreement. Access and Traffic Management The PUD plans show an overall reduction in the number of driveways and access points onto City streets and County Roads. Engineering staff generally supports the site access and circulation plan shown on the plans as well as the proposed reduction in driveways. The PUD includes the removal of existing driveway entrances and the construction of new entrances, both on City and County streets. Therefore, a City Right-of-Way Management Permit is required. All driveway entrances must meet the City standards for commercial driveway aprons. In addition, a Hennepin County permit will be required for all work within County right-of-way. Hennepin County is planning a pavement mill and overlay project on Winnetka Avenue in 2015. If possible, the Developer should attempt to perform all driveway apron, curb, and utility work requiring street excavation and restoration prior to the County's mill and overlay project. The overlay project is scheduled for mid-September 2015. As part of the mill and overlay project, Hennepin County is considering reducing the number of travel lanes on Winnetka from 4 lanes to 3 lanes from Orkla Drive to just south of Medicine Lake Road. The City's traffic engineer has reviewed the County's overlay plans and has also performed a review of the Liberty Crossing plans. The traffic engineer's determination is that vehicle trips generated by the Liberty Crossing PUD will not adversely impact traffic on the adjacent streets, and that residential uses will be better served than commercial in this location, especially during peak periods. In addition, turning movements into and out of the PUD will benefit from the proposed three lane design, and the shoulder buffer will create a safer environment for pedestrians, bikes, and motorists. Preliminary Plat The Developer has submitted an ALTA land title survey of the property within the proposed PUD. The site is comprised of four existing parcels, as summarized below: • VFW site at 7775 Medicine Lake Road (Lot 1, Block 1 of Golden Valley VFW Post Number 7051) • SIFCO site at 2430 Winnetka Avenue (Lot 1, Block 1 of MCTAC Addition) • Car Wash site at 2485 Rhode Island Avenue North (Lot 2, Block 1 of MCTAC Addition) • Restaurant site at 2480 Winnetka Avenue (not part of any plat of record) The existing public easements within the properties above will need to be vacated as part of the development. The City will initiate the vacation process upon application by the Developer, and the process will run concurrent with the final plat approval. The Developer must provide the City with legal descriptions and exhibits for the easement vacations, as may be required. G:\Developments-Private\Liberty Crossing\Memos\Liberty_FinaIPUD_Review061515.docx The Developer has submitted a preliminary plat for review. Prior to final plat approval, the Developer must include the following items on the plat: 1. The'dedication of public right-of-way for the future Rhode Island Avenue cul-de-sac in the south end of the PUD. 2. The dedication of drainage and utility easements over the proposed flood storage areas, including the underground tank and flood storage swale. 3. The dedication of drainage and utility easements along public streets, property lines, and plat boundaries consistent with the City's Subdivision Ordinance. This PUD is adjacent to County Highways 156 (Winnetka Avenue) and 70 (Medicine Lake Road) and therefore,the plans must also be submitted to Hennepin County for review and comment. Utility Plan (Water and Sanitary Sewer) The Developer has submitted a utility plan showing the extension of new water and sanitary sewer mains into the PUD. The City's water and sanitary sewer systems that provide service to these properties have adequate capacity to accommodate the proposed redevelopment. Staff offers the following comments in regards to the utility plan: 1. Staff recommends the Developer adjust the grades of the sanitary sewer mains to be more uniform throughout the development, if feasible. 2. The water, sanitary sewer, and storm sewer systems within the PUD will be owned and maintained by the Developer or future property owner. The Developer will be required to enter into a maintenance agreement with the City outlining these requirements. 3. The private utilities that currently serve the existing parcels are generally located overhead. The new private utilities installed for this PUD must be placed underground. In addition,joint trench construction methods must be employed to minimize the amount of space consumed by the utilities. 4. All existing and proposed buildings within the PUD must comply with the City's 1/1 Ordinance. Upon completion of the proposed sewer work, the new sewer mains and services must be inspected and found to be compliant with the 1/1 ordinance, prior to occupancy of the buildings. 5. A City Right-of-Way Management Permit is required for all excavations and obstructions within City streets, rights-of-way, and easements. All pavements and subgrades must be restored according to City standards. 6. A Hennepin County permit will be required for all work within County right-of-way. Work planned within county roads must be coordinated with Hennepin County. This is especially important on Winnetka Avenue as the County will be completing a mill and overlay project in 2015. Stormwater Management This PUD is within the Main Stem subwatershed of the Bassett Creek watershed. More specifically, it is located within the Medicine Lake Road and Winnetka Avenue Area Long Term Flood Mitigation Study area. The site generally drains from north to south via storm sewer systems located within Rhode Island Avenue and Winnetka Avenue, eventually discharging into G:\Developments-Private\Liberty Crossing\Memos\Liberty_FinaIPUD_ReviewO61515.docx the DeCola Ponds system and Bassett Creek. The PUD proposes to disturb approximately 10 acres and will reduce the impervious surface area by about 0.3 acres. The PUD is subject to the review and approval of the Bassett Creek Watershed Management Commission (BCWMC). Plans will be forwarded to the BCWMC once they are found to be acceptable by the City. According to the grading, drainage, and erosion control plan submitted by the Developer, the site will drain to two filtration basins before discharge off site. Peak runoff rates, stormwater volume, and phosphorus and sediment loads are being reduced as a result of the stormwater treatment proposed. Staff offers the following comments regarding the grading, drainage, and erosion control plan submitted: 1. The Developer is encouraged to add stormwater practices that will retain or reuse stormwater volume on site, consistent with the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) Construction Permit, the City's Stormwater Ordinance, and BCWMC requirements. 2. At the northeast pipe outlet into Filtration Basin 1, staff recommends the Developer extend the storm sewer and install a catch basin in the street, rather than a curb cut with rip rap. The City's experience is that the curb cut designs are difficult to maintain and are often blocked. 3. The two eastern pipe outlets into Filtration Basin 1 are very close to the basin outlet, short circuiting the water quality treatment effectiveness and increasing maintenance frequency. Increasing the spacing is recommended. 4. Staff recommends that the Developer install a standard catch basin structure with 4-foot sump upstream of Filtration Basin 2 to reduce the amount of sediment that will accumulate in the basin. 5. Snow may not be stored on top of Filtration Basin 2 or any other stormwater treatment basin. Please remove this note and look for alternatives. 6. The Developer must remove trees proposed within the footprint of the filtration basins. Shrubs, perennials, and grasses are acceptable due to their smaller root structure and for facilitating maintenance and vegetation management. Native plant species must be selected for these areas. 7. Rock construction entrances meeting the City's standard must be shown on the plan. All storm sewer and stormwater quality treatment facilities within this PUD, including the native vegetation around the filtration basins, will be owned and maintained by the Developer or future property owner. A maintenance agreement outlining these responsibilities will be drafted by the City and must be signed by the Developer prior to the issuance of permits. The Developer or contractor must obtain a City Stormwater Management Permit before construction. A stormwater management plan meeting the standards of the City of Golden Valley must be included with the permit application. Plan review and approval by the BCWMC must also be completed before a City Stormwater Management Permit can be issued. G:\Developments-Private\Liberty Cross ing\Memos\Liberty_FinaIPU D_Review061515.docx This PUD is also subject to the requirements of the MPCA Construction Stormwater Permit. A copy of this permit and the corresponding Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan must be submitted to the City before work can begin. Tree Preservation/Landscape Plan The PUD is subject to the City's Tree Preservation Ordinance and Minimum Landscape Standards. A Tree Preservation Plan with an inventory of significant trees has been submitted by the Developer. Based upon the tree removals proposed,the Developer must obtain a Tree Preservation Permit. The plans include foundation plantings, and the planting of shrubs and perennials within the site as outlined in the City's minimum landscape standards. Consistent with the City's natural resources management plan, tree species diversification and the selection of native tree and plant species are encouraged to be included in all new developments. The City Forester has reviewed the plans and has the following additional comments: 1. The Developer must submit a summary table with the numbers of all trees, shrubs, perennials, and other plant materials shown on the plans. 2. Depending on the type of soils present, staff generally recommends not planting northern pin oak in clay soils. Swamp white oak may provide a good alternative. 3. Consider using Autumn Spire or Northwood red maples rather than Autumn Blaze maples. 4. The Developer will be required to submit a financial security to the City to ensure that the trees and landscaping survive a warranty period. The Developer must submit a cost estimate to furnish and install all trees and plant materials shown in the plans to help the City determine the security amount. Summary and Recommendations Engineering staff recommends approval of the Liberty Crossing final PUD plans subject to the comments contained in this review, which are summarized as follows: 1. The Developer must address the flood mitigation comments contained in this review, and must continue to work with the City on the design details of the proposed flood storage areas (underground tank, flood storage swale) in order to maximize the long term flood mitigation efforts within the subwatershed. 2. The Developer must continue to work with the City on the alignment and design of the future north-south trail, generally located on the east side of the PUD, as the plans for the flood storage areas are further developed. 3. Public easements within the existing parcels will need to be vacated as part of the development. 4. The Developer must address comments regarding the preliminary plat, before final plat approval. 5. The Developer must address comments regarding the utility plan, as discussed in this review. G:\Developments-Private\Liberty Crossing\Memos\Liberty_FinaIPUD_ReviewO61515.dOcx 6. The water, sanitary sewer, and storm sewer systems, and stormwater quality treatment facilities within the PUD will be owned and maintained by the Developer or future property owner. The Developer will be required to enter into a maintenance agreement with the City outlining these requirements. 7. The Developer must address comments regarding the stormwater management plan, before submittal to the BCWMC for review. 8. The Developer must address the City Forester's comments related to the tree and landscape plan. Approval is also subject to the comments of the City Attorney, Fire Chief, other City staff, and other governmental entities. Please feel free to call me if you have any questions regarding this matter. C: Tom Burt, City Manager Marc Nevinski, Physical Development Director Emily Goellner, Associate Planner John Crelly, Fire Chief Jerry Frevel, Building Official Bert Tracy, Public Works Maintenance Manager Al Lundstrom, Park Maintenance Supervisor and City Forester Tim Kieffer, Street Maintenance Supervisor RJ Kakach, Engineer Eric Seaburg, Engineer Tom Hoffman, Water Resources Technician G:\Developments-Private\Liberty Crossing\Memos\Liberty_finalPUD_ReviewO61515.dOcx Regular Meeting of the Golden Valley Planning Commission June 22, 2015 A regular meeting of the Planning Co mission was held at the Golden Valley City Hall, Council Chambers, 7800 Golden Vall Road, Golden Valley, Minnesota, on Monday, 22, 2015. Vice Chair Segelbau called the meeting to order at 7 pm. Those pr nt were Planning Com ssioners Baker, Blum, Cera, Johnson, Kluchka, Segelbaurn a Waldhauser. Also esent was Associate P er/Grant Writer Emily Goellner, City En er Jeff Oliver, nd Administrative. istant Lisa Wittman. 1. Approval of Minutes wT= June 8, 2015, Regular P,,,,, ing mission Meeting Johnson referred to t - inth par raph on page t nd clarified that a privacy notice might be require ja mobile foo vendor license applic f credit card information is requested. MOV y Cera, seconded by K chka and motion carried unanimously to approve the J 8, 2015, minutes with the a ove noted clarification. 2. Informal Public Hearing — Final Plan Review — Planned Unit Development (PUD #123) — Liberty Crossing — Southeast Quadrant of Medicine Lake Road and Winnetka Avenue North Intersection Applicant: Intuitive Investments Addresses: 7751-7775 Medicine Lake Road, 2430 and 2480 Winnetka Avenue North, and 2485 Rhode Island Avenue North Purpose: To allow a 184 unit apartment building and 63 townhome units. Goellner referred to a location map and discussed the applicant's Final PUD proposal to construct a 184 unit apartment building and 63 townhome units on four parcels of land in the southeast quadrant of the Medicine Lake Road and Winnetka Avenue intersection. Goellner stated that the properties were re-designated on the Comprehensive Plan General Land Use Plan Map to High Density Residential in December of 2014, and were re-zoned to High Density Residential in May of 2015. Goellner referred to renderings of the proposed buildings and explained that most of the townhome units will be two-stories in height and will be landscaped to create a front yard neighborhood feel. The apartment building will be five stories tall with one level of underground parking and will include a pool, a dog run, and a clubhouse. She discussed the proposed landscaping and screening that will provide privacy for tenants and will help the apartment building fit into the neighborhood. Minutes of the Golden Valley Planning Commission June 22, 2015 Page 2 Goellner referred to the parking requirements and explained that the apartment building requires 276 parking spaces, the applicant is proposing 288 spaces (232 underground, 56 surface). The townhomes require 126 spaces, and the applicant is proposing 138 spaces. The applicant is also proposing an additional 39 parking spaces along the internal drives and will need to provide 14 spaces for bicycles. Goellner referred to a site plan and discussed the existing and proposed access points. She also discussed the proposed trails and sidewalks on the perimeter and interior of the site and said the pedestrian circulation will be strong in both the north-south and east- west connections. Goellner discussed the history of flooding in the area and stated that the applicant has been working with the City regarding stormwater management strategies including: removing a portion of Rhode Island Avenue and installing a dry pond on the northeast corner of the site, installing a large underground stormwater storage system on the current VFW site, and installing an infiltration basin on the north side of the apartment building. She added that creative management on this site can help the overall flood conditions on Medicine Lake Road and throughout the DeCola Ponds system. She stated that staff is recommending approval of this Final PUD proposal. Segelbaum discussed the differences between the Preliminary PUD plan and the Final PUD plan including the different access points and driveways in and out of the development, a quality assessment regarding materials, and the flood mitigation strategies, and the enhanced sidewalk plan. Goellner referred to a drawing of the access points and explained that the number of access point has been reduced since the Preliminary PUD plan review and that the access from Medicine Lake Road will be a right in only turn. She added that the sidewalk plan has been enhanced and a trail along Rhode Island Avenue has been added to the Final Plan. Waldhauser asked if there is a continuous bike trail from Rhode Island Avenue to Medicine Lake Road, or if ends where the swale will be on the north. Kluchka said there is an existing sidewalk to the north of the proposed new trail. Oliver clarified there will be a trail where Rhode Island Avenue is being removed that will connect the existing sidewalk on the east side of Rhode Island to the trail system further to the south into Pennsylvania Woods. Cera asked for clarification on the location of the proposed dry pond. Oliver explained that a portion of Rhode Island Avenue will remain to gain access to Dover Hills. A portion of the right-of-way will be used to provide a dry pond in the short term as investigation of additional flood storage continues. He stated that water will flow from Medicine Lake Road into the underground flood storage and the swale, and will eventually discharge into the expanded storage in the DeCola ponds/Pennsylvania Woods area. Baker asked if there is a difference between the terms "swale" and "dry pond." Oliver said they are essentially the same, however, in the short term it is more accurately serving as a dry pond than a conveyance swale which is what it will be in the long term. Baker referred to the photo shown of an underground storage tank and noted that it had standing water in it. He said it is his understanding that there would not be standing water Minutes of the Golden Valley Planning Commission June 22, 2015 Page 3 in the proposed underground storage. Oliver said he didn't know the context of the photo shown, but the design for this proposal will have a sloped floor so water will eventually flow out. Blum asked about the security of the underground storage tanks. Oliver said they will be locked and not accessible except for maintenance. Kluchka said his recollection from the Preliminary Plan review was that discussion of the expanded flood storage could not move forward unless the three cities involved agreed on how the financing would work. Oliver said the City knows storage needs to be provided in this area and that there is an opportunity with this development to take the first steps at resolving the overall flooding issue in this watershed. He added that the finalization of the overall financing is many months away, but there is an opportunity with Tax Increment Financing to maximize the public benefit on this site with this development. Segelbaum asked if the developer is responsible for all of the costs or just their part. Oliver said the developer will be responsible for mitigation and that the conversations are ongoing. Baker referred to the access plan and said he thought the access road/alley north of the Walgreen's property wasn't usable but it is now being shown on the plans as a main access point. Kluchka asked for clarification on if that road is for emergency or primary access. Johnson asked which access will be the primary access to the underground parking. Goellner said the parking ramp will be accessed at 23rd and Rhode Island Avenue on the southeast corner of the apartment building. Johnson referred to the main entrance on Winnetka Avenue for the townhomes and asked how that will be prevented from becoming a throughway versus just an access. Goellner agreed that wouldn't be a desirable entrance for the entire development and that the underground parking access will most likely be the preferred access for people living in the apartments. She added that the applicant is also exploring various signage options. Oliver explained that that entrance was placed where it is because it is central to the site and traffic can access the entrance from both directions rather than taking all the traffic all the way through the development. Also, it is evenly spaced between 23rd Avenue and the other entrances and it is located at the top of the hill to maximize visibility for turns in and out of the site. He added that the County is exploring converting Winnetka Avenue from four lanes to three. Cera asked what would prevent people from turning left from Medicine Lake Road. Oliver said he is confident that the access on Medicine Lake Road can be designed appropriately to help stop cut across traffic. Johnson referred to the applicant's narrative and questioned why it states in one location that they encourage affordable housing but they aren't providing any affordable units. Goellner said that staff always encourages affordable housing, but the City doesn't have the authority to require affordable housing as a part of the proposal. She added that the applicant is providing a lot of variety in the types of units and not just offering luxury units. Minutes of the Golden Valley Planning Commission June 22, 2015 Page 4 Johnson questioned where the City can require affordable housing. Kluchka said that would be a discussion for the City's HRA. Kluchka referred to the proposed sidewalks and asked if they would be the same width as the sidewalks and trails that surround this proposal. Todd Schachtman, Applicant, said he is excited for the options, variety and overall revitalization of this area. He said he is confident this proposal will help redefine this area and help with additional infrastructure improvements. He referred to the comment about the location of the buildings being different in the Preliminary Plan and clarified that the proposed location of the buildings are the same in the Final Plan as they were in the Preliminary Plan. He referred to the access point south of the Dairy Queen property and explained that they will own it, but it is not a defined access point into Liberty Crossing. He added that they have worked diligently with the County, the City and Walgreens's regarding the access points to create a much safer environment. He reiterated that the traffic for the apartment building will use 23rd Avenue to access the underground parking and that the overall access plan works best with the stormwater issues. He referred to the stormwater management issues and noted that at the Preliminary design phase they were at a net neutral, but now they are well above that and they are happy to provide as much stormwater storage space as they can. He referred to the proposed landscaping and trail plans and noted that the landscaping really defines and delineates the townhome and apartment entrances and will be a landscape-rich environment. He stated that they've always viewed the trail system and connections as a key feature for them. He added that he is also looking to add solar panels. Waldhauser referred to the comment in the staff report about not allowing fill to be brought in and asked the applicant about using fill in the southeast corner of the property. Schachtman stated that they are planning to bring fill out, but will not be bringing fill in. Segelbaum asked the applicant if they are planning on installing vehicle charging stations. Schachtman said yes and added that they will also be installing extensive bike racks. Johnson referred to the proposed right only turn on Medicine Lake Road and asked about the purpose of a right turn only. Schachtman stated that the County had alignment and safety concerns. Blum asked what other types of sustainability items are proposed. Schachtman stated that in addition to the vehicle charging stations, solar will be implemented, more and larger windows will be used, and they will be recapturing water to use for irrigation. Kluchka referred to the area between Walgreen's and Dairy Queen and asked if there is an opportunity to clean up the trees in that area. Schachtman said yes, it is a part of their development and will be maintained. Minutes of the Golden Valley Planning Commission June 22, 2015 Page 5 Kluchka referred to the sidewalk widths within the proposed development and asked if there was a purpose in making them narrower than the sidewalks or trails leading to the development. Elisa Richardson, Tanek Architecture, explained that the trail along the east side of the development will be 10 feet wide, and the bulk of the development will have 5-foot wide sidewalks. She added that the sidewalk along Winnetka will be widened and will be moved further away from the curb. Kluchka said he wants the pedestrian experience to be consistent coming from a trail or sidewalk and not have people feel like they are coming into a private, not as welcoming development. Richardson said they could make their main sidewalks in the development wider and use different materials to welcome people through the development. Kluchka asked about signage. Richardson said there will be a sign on the southeast entrance on Winnetka Avenue and a sign a Medicine Lake Road. Segelbaum asked if the applicant would be keeping the Liberty Crossing name. Schachtman said yes. He added that the name was chosen out of admiration of the VFW and that the clubhouse will be available for them to use for their monthly meeting. He said he wants the clubhouse to be representative of the VFW and what it has meant to Golden Valley. Waldhauser asked about the rent costs. Schachtman said the rates will be representative of the choice of housing. He said the rents will be typical market rate and will most likely start between $1,000 and $1,400 and go up from there, but they will be less than some other apartments that have been built recently. Waldhauser asked about the rent for the larger units for families. Schachtman said they would be approximately $1,700 to $2,100. He added that the units will be high quality housing that will create choice for different types of people. Segelbaum opened the publichearing. Roger Kinisto, 30th and Kentucky, asked if the townhomes would be privately owned and why the development couldn't be all townhomes and no apartments. He asked if there would be any retail and if the property taxes are sufficient to pay for the number of new students so this development won't be a burden on everyone else. Victoria Hopponen, 2400 Valders Avenue North, said she is the only one left in the area who knows what the area used to look like. She said the land south of Walgreens is unstable ground, the manufacturer bulldozed the hill, and the restaurant used to be standing water. She said there were fox, skunks and deer and they won't come back. She asked how many pilings will have to be put in to stabilize the ground and how long they will have to put up with it, and what time they are allowed to start construction so that people can sleep in. Minutes of the Golden Valley Planning Commission June 22, 2015 Page 6 Seeing and hearing no one else wishing to comment, Segelbaum closed the public hearing. Kluchka asked the applicant to address the rental and ownership markets. Schachtman stated that all of the units in the proposed development will be rental. He said they are estimating 14 to 15 months of construction and that they believe this type of housing is needed and wanted. Segelbaum asked if there will be a retail component to the proposal. Schachtman said no, and added that they are pleased to have Walgreens as a neighbor. Kluchka asked about the construction schedule and the communication plans with the community. Schachtman said they hope to start demolition in September or October with 14 to 15 months of construction. He stated that their managing partner will communicate on their website, as well as having on-site communications. Kluchka suggested that a condition of approval be added stating that a communications plan with the neighborhood must be implemented. Segelbaum asked about the hours of construction. Schachtman said they will follow whatever the City requires regarding hours of construction and noise. Kluchka asked the applicant to speak about the soil quality. Schachtman said they have done extensive environmental work on the site and have found nothing atypical. Goellner added that investigation is underway regarding soil contamination. Kluchka asked if pilings will be needed. Schachtman stated that none of their findings have deterred them from being able to use common construction techniques. Tom Dillon, NAI Everest, added that in their geo-technical study the worst part of the development is under the VFW. He stated that they might be able to use geo-piles instead of pounding piles into the ground. Johnson asked the applicant why they are proposing an apartment building instead of having the entire development be townhomes. Schachtman said based on feasibility studies they've done there is a need for choice. Kluchka asked if there will be enough taxes generated to support the needs of the families living here. Goellner said the County's assessing department would determine the amount of property taxes to be paid. Cera added that the school district sets a budget based on parcels in the district so people won't see a big jump in their taxes due to this proposal. Segelbaum asked if there is a time frame in which construction has to be completed. Goellner said she didn't know, but that she would look into it. Kluchka reiterated that he would like there to be a good communication plan with the neighborhood. Segelbaum questioned if the Planning Commission has ever required a Minutes of the Golden Valley Planning Commission June 22, 2015 Page 7 communication plan as a condition of approval in the past. Waldhauser stated Breck was required to have a communication plan with their neighbors. Waldhauser said she thinks the changes that have been made to this proposal make sense and that this development looks like an asset to the community and she likes the mix of housing and that it is not all high end, luxurious units. She added that the progress on the stormwater mitigation is also nice to see. Blum said he is glad to see a creative water management solution. He said this development will have good access to public transportation, new jobs will be created and the population increase will support jobs in the area. Kluchka said he is enthusiastic about this development. He said he is happy to see the elevation changes because it will look like a neighborhood. He said he wants to recommend a welcoming element around the sidewalks. Segelbaum said he wants to be careful about people cutting through areas where the traffic needs to be so there needs to be a balance between the two. Kluchka asked if striping would be required internally. Oliver said that all pedestrian facilities need to meet accessibility laws. Baker said he is supportive of this the proposal. He said he likes the contributions to the water management issues. He added that he is going to hold the applicant to his commitment to use solar energy. Cera agreed and said this will be a nice addition to that corner of the City. He said he would encourage lower rents and organic recycling. Segelbaum said he thinks this development will be an asset to the community and will help with flood mitigation in the entire area. MOVED by Baker, seconded by Cera and motion carried unanimously to recommend approval of the Final PUD Plan for Liberty Crossing PUD No. 123, subject to the following findings and conditions- Findings- 1. onditions:Findings:1. The PUD plan is tailored to the specific characteristics of the site and achieves a higher quality of site planning and design than generally expected under conventional provisions of the ordinance. The applicant worked closely with the City during a lengthy pre-application process—and has continued to refine the proposal—in order to accommodate the unique circumstances surrounding the site. The flexibility allowed under a PUD is necessary to achieve the outcome that will not only benefit the applicant, but the City as a whole. 2. The PUD plan preserves and protects substantial desirable portions of the site's characteristics, open space and sensitive environmental features including steep slopes, trees, scenic views, creeks, wetlands, and open waters. Given the lack of open space or other sensitive environmental features on the site today, there is little available for the applicant to preserve. However, the proposal does take advantage of the natural areas of Pennsylvania Woods and DeCola Pond B to the east and, in partnership with the City, will use a constructed swale to manage stormwater more Minutes of the Golden Valley Planning Commission June 22, 2015 Page 8 effectively and result in the creation of additional green space within in the Rhode Island Avenue right-of-way. 3. The PUD plan includes efficient and effective use (which includes preservation) of the land. The proposal not only provides for an increase in residential density in an underutilized area well served by transit, but the creative inclusion of regional flood storage within the development provides a benefit to the greater area. 4. The PUD Plan results in development compatible with adjacent uses and is consistent with the Comprehensive Plan and redevelopment plans and goals. The use of this property for higher density residential use is compatible with the neighboring property to the east and the density being proposed is consistent with the City's revised Comprehensive Plan. 5. The PUD plan is consistent with preserving and improving the general health, safety and general welfare of the people of the City. The potential for reduction in flooding along Medicine Lake Road and within the DeCola Ponds area provides great benefit to the City and its residents. 6. The PUD plan meets the PUD Intent and Purpose provision and all other PUD ordinance provisions. The flexibility provided by the PUD allows for a better site layout and coordination between the two uses on the site. Conditions: 1. The plans prepared by Tanek, submitted May 21 and June 8, 2015, shall become a part of this approval. 2. The recommendations and requirements outlined in the memo from the Fire Department, dated June 15, 2015, shall become a part of this approval. 3. The recommendations and requirements outlined in the memo from the Engineering Division, dated June 18, 2015, shall become a part of this approval. 4. Public bicycle racks or similar facilities for the parking/storage of a minimum of 14 bicycles shall be provided, based on a calculation of 5% of the 276 parking spaces required for the apartment building. 5. All signage must meet the requirements of the City's Sign Code (Section 4.20). 6. The City Attorney will determine if a title review is necessary prior to approval of the Final Plat. 7. The Final Plat shall include "P.U.D. No. 123" in its title. 8. A park dedication fee of $60,100, or 2% of the land value, shall be paid before release of the Final Plat. 9. A neighborhood communications plan regarding the construction schedule must be established prior to issuance of a building permit. 10. This approval is subject to all other state, federal, and local ordinances, regulations, or laws with authority over this development. Wittman, Lisa From: pronovic@gmail.com on behalf of Kenneth Pronovici <pronovic@ieee.org> Sent: Thursday, May 28, 2015 9:34 PM To: Planning Subject: Feedback about Proposed Liberty Crossing Development Dear Planning Commission Members: I read with interest the article in the Sun Post a few weeks ago about the proposed Liberty Crossing development in the area bordered by Medicine Lake Road, Rhode Island Avenue N, and Winnetka Avenue. It's an exciting development for the area. The Sun Post article made it sound like a portion of Rhode Island Avenue N might be closed as part of the drainage design for the area. I just wanted to mention that the bike/walk path through Pennsylvania Woods Park is an important connector for north-south bike traffic. My wife and I would be disappointed if we lost access to that trail as a result of this development. The short Pennsylvania Woods trail (which is essentially a pedestrian connector between Rhode Island Avenue N and Pennsylvania Avenue N) provides a convenient, low-traffic way to connect from New Hope, Crystal and other points north to amenities in Golden Valley, including the Luce Line trail and the restaurants, shops, and parks in the vicinity of Winnetka and Hwy 55. My wife and I regularly ride down to Golden Valley to get dinner using this route. This trail also enables good, low-traffic bike connections to the wider metro-area bike trails. For instance, by crossing Hwy 55 at the Glenwood light, it's easy to stay on neighborhood roads down to the pedestrian bridge over 1-394 by Morrie's Cadillac, and from there to the Cedar Lake Trail. Because of the way the railroad cuts through Golden Valley, losing this connection between Rhode Island Avenue N and Pennsylvania Avenue N would require cyclists to ride on much higher-traffic roads like Duluth or Winnetka to make similar connections. Having served on New Hope's Citizens Advisory Commission, I realize that you have to take a lot of different viewpoints into account when working on a plan such as this. I appreciate anything you can do to help preserve this important bicycle route through Golden Valley. Sincerely, Ken Pronovici Kenneth J. Pronovici 3725 Maryland Avenue N New Hope, MN 55427 Email: pronovic gieee.org i N p Z a�O 0D O •y L Q p' = A O «d n m 2 `! 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Z 0 00 Aft Z Q oe I i I _ m _____________________� Y I w a 1 Y f L. z rE • •• O i I I ' rIc CD 0 t, i ca �LL ' -... I _i i I o fI °° '- - — a '-MEW 114W I o ----- I` V z -----------T------_T-------T--------f-------T__________- I I � I • I I I I• Y I W I I —i— J Jn rbc ' o I I PbnJ bJennB .'��µp _ _ Z pp /f'T J J. o � O o I l� a - ------ ------- LU 1 LU O "' J C Q e O N CL • I i SN31S),SOD3 N` Odn N°Id DNIJ'v'34nS SN` Id 3d` :)SaN'r (]NY d3A03 aN`I JNISSOU A143911 'fill C%4 1p nI x � d u O Z p Q � o J O N \w / r O w ZQ Q Z V � J � N _ LU i- m J Qdu Le) N LU a)N N Q U Y � LL V) Z �z Q J Vim! O L j NZ O U m 07 V CY O V) Ul) ILLI LOJ LL- J Z CL N Q (7 W M F— 10 Uj N m V C1C) N N V C ORDINANCE NO. 569, 2ND SERIES AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE CITY CODE Approval of Final Plan of Development Liberty Crossing P.U.D. No. 123 Intuitive Investments, Applicant The City Council for the City of Golden Valley hereby ordains as follows: Section 1. City Code Chapter 11 entitled "Land Use Regulations (Zoning)" is amended in Section 11.10, Subd. 2, and Section 11.55, by approving the Final Plan of Development for Planned Unit Development (P.U.D.) 123 thereby allowing the applicant to construct a 184 unit apartment building and 63 townhomes at 7751-7775 Medicine Lake Road, 2485 Rhode Island Avenue North, 2480 Winnetka Avenue North, and 2430 Winnetka Avenue North. This PUD is subject to all of the terms of the permit to be issued including, but not limited to the following specific conditions: 1. The plans prepared by Tanek, submitted May 21 and June 8, 2015, shall become a part of this approval. 2. The recommendations and requirements outlined in the memo from the Fire Department, dated June 15, 2015, shall become a part of this approval. 3. The recommendations and requirements outlined in the memo from the Engineering Division, dated June 18, 2015, shall become a part of this approval. 4. Public bicycle racks or similar facilities for the parking/storage of a minimum of 14 bicycles shall be provided, based on a calculation of 5% of the 276 parking spaces required for the apartment building. 5. All signage must meet the requirements of the City's Sign Code (Section 4.20). 6. The City Attorney will determine if a title review is necessary prior to approval of the Final Plat. 7. The Final Plat shall include "P.U.D. No. 123" in its title. 8. A park dedication fee of $60,100, or 2% of the land value, shall be paid before release of the Final Plat. 9. A neighborhood communications plan regarding the construction schedule must be established prior to issuance of a building permit. 10.This approval is subject to all other state, federal, and local ordinances, regulations, or laws with authority over this development. In addition the Council makes the following findings pursuant to City Code Section 11.55, Subd. 6(Q): 1. The PUD plan is tailored to the specific characteristics of the site and achieves a higher quality of site planning and design than generally expected under conventional provisions of the ordinance. 2. The PUD plan preserves and protects substantial desirable portions of the site's characteristics, open space and sensitive environmental features including steep slopes, trees, scenic views, creeks, wetlands and open waters. 3. The PUD plan includes efficient and effective use (which includes preservation) of the land. Ordinance No. 569 - continued 4. The PUD plan results in development compatible with adjacent uses and is consistent with the Comprehensive Plan and redevelopment plans and goals. 5. The PUD plan is consistent with preserving and improving the general health, safety and general welfare of the people of the City. 6. The PUD plan meets the PUD Intent and Purpose provision and all other PUD ordinance provisions Section 2. The tracts of land affected by this ordinance is legally described as follows: The West 374 feet of the North 205 feet of the South 860 feet of the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 29, Township 118, Range 21, except the West 33 feet thereof, according to the United States Government Survey thereof, Hennepin County, Minnesota. Together with an easement for ingress and egress over the following described property: The North 30 feet of the North 655 feet of the South 860 feet of that part of the northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 29, Township 118, Range 21, lying West of the East 704 feet thereof, except the West 374 feet of the North 205 feet of the South 860 feet of the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 29, Township 118, Range 21, as shown in deed Document No. 2476007; And together with an easement for private roadway as evidenced by Document No. 1287516. Being Registered land as is evidenced by Certificate of Title No. 1305335. Lot 1, Block 1, McTac Addition, according to the recorded plat thereof, Hennepin County, Minnesota. Being Registered land as is evidenced by Certificate of Title No. 689295. Lot 1, Block 1, Golden Valley VFW Post Number 7051, according to the recorded plat thereof, Hennepin County, Minnesota. Being Registered land as is evidenced by Certificate of Title No. 1325613. Section 3. City Code Chapter 1 entitled "General Provisions and Definitions Applicable to the Entire City Code Including Penalty for Violation" and Sec. 11.99 entitled "Violation a Misdemeanor" are hereby adopted in their entirety, by reference, as though repeated verbatim herein. Section 4. This ordinance shall take effect from and after its passage and publication as required by law. Adopted by the City Council this 21st day of July, 2015. /s/Shepard M. Harris Shepard M. Harris, Mayor ATTEST: /s/Kristine A. Luedke Kristine A. Luedke, City Clerk ( y ej te mu IP 100 oiuoiuou 15'115 umoi 11111 7IIII ��� 10001 011,01,01, Physical Development Department 763-593-8095/763-593-8109(fax) Executive Summary For Action Golden Valley City Council Meeting July 21, 2015 Agenda Item 6. A. METRO Blue Line Extension Update Prepared By Jason Zimmerman, Planning Manager Project Summary Representatives from the Project Office will be available to update the City Council on the efforts to understand the likely parking demand at a Golden Valley Road station and to provide dedicated parking there for the light rail line. The Project Office has scheduled a public Open House for Wednesday, August 12, 2015, in the Council Chambers from 5:30 to 7 pm with a presentation at 6 pm to give an update on the proposed station(s) located in Golden Valley and to discuss parking and pedestrian/bicycle access. A revised timeline for local approval of the preliminary design plans (municipal consent) has plans being submitted to the cities by the end of December of 2015. This would mean a public hearing on the plans would need to be scheduled in January of 2016 and a vote for local approval taken in February or March. Station Area Planning Summary The City Council is being asked to receive and file the final report from the Station Area Planning process. A digital version can be found on the Hennepin County web site via the link below: http://www.hennepin.us/—/media/hennepinus/residents/transportation/bottineau/minneapolis- gv-report-final-150601-web.pdf This report is the culmination of over a year of work by the Bottineau LRT Planning Advisory Committee and involved many conversations with stakeholders, three open houses, and one community meeting. For each of the station areas, the report analyzes the existing conditions, summarizes the station area vision, and lays out an implementation framework. The report was reviewed by the Planning, Environmental, and Open Space and Recreation Commissions on June 22, 2015. Commissioners agreed that their main areas of concern were: the reconstruction of Golden Valley Road, the connections to Three Rivers Park District trails, the issue of parking at the Golden Valley Road station, and the fact that a large percentage of Golden Valley residents are not within a 1/2 mile of either of the proposed stations. The findings and recommendations that came out of the Station Area Planning process and that are included in the report will provide a critical reference point for possible changes to the City's Comprehensive Plan as it is updated in 2018. Attachments • METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Station Area Planning Final Report for Plymouth Avenue and Golden Valley Road Stations (93 pages) Recommended Action Receive and file METRO Blue Line Extension Update. Receive and file METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Station Area Planning Final Report. Plymouth Avenue and Golden Valley Road Stations Minneapolis and Golden Valley, MN METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Station Area Planning June 1, 2015 Prepared for: Hennepin County, Bottineau LRT Community Works City of Minneapolis and City of Golden Valley CONSULTING TEAM: SRF Consulting Group, Inc. Hoisington Koegler Group, Inc. Leland Consulting Group, Inc. Tangible Consulting Services Carroll, Franck and Associates METRO BLUE LINE EXTENSION (BOTTINEAU LRT) PHASE 1: STATION AREA PLANNING PLYMOUTH AVENUE AND GOLDEN VALLEY ROAD STATIONS City of Minneapolis and City of Golden Valley, Hennepin County iii Elected Officials Hennepin County Linda Higgins, District 2 City of Minneapolis Betsy Hodges, Mayor Barbara Johnson, Council President Blong Yang, Ward 5 Golden Valley Shep Harris, Mayor Joanie Clausen, City Council Larry Fonnest, City Council Steve Schmidgall, City Council Andy Snope, City Council Hennepin County, Department of Community Works and Department of Planning, Policy and Land Management Andrew Gillett, Principal Planning Analyst - Project Manager Denise Engen, Principal Planning Analyst - Public Engagement Manager Brent Rusco, Senior Professional Engineer Joe Gladke, Manager of Engineering and Transit Planning Karen Nikolai, Manager, Healthy Community Planning Darlene Walser, Bottineau Community Works Program Manager Health Equity and Engagement Cohort Northside Residents Redevelopment Council (NRRC) Harrison Neighborhood Association (HNA) Heritage Park Neighborhood Association (HPNA) Comunidades Latinas Unidas en Servicio (CLUES) CAPI USA Lao Assistance Center of MN (LACM) Redeemer Center for Life (RCFL) Masjid An-Nur (MAN) Nexus Community Partners, Facilitator Technical Advisory Committee Tina Sanz, Hennepin County Jeff Oliver, City of Golden Valley Jason Zimmerman, City of Golden Valley Emily Goellner, City of Golden Valley Eric Eckman, City of Golden Valley Don Pflaum, City of Minneapolis Jim Voll, City of Minneapolis Beth Grosen, City of Minneapolis Becca Farrar, City of Minneapolis Dean Carlson, Minneapolis Public Housing Authority Jennifer Ringold, Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board Adam Arvidson, Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board Alicia Vap, Metro Transit Michael Mechtenberg, Metro Transit Pierce Canser, Metro Transit Amy Geisler, Metro Transit Karen Lyons, Metropolitan Council Mike Larson, Metropolitan Council Jan Youngquist, Metropolitan Council Ryan Wilson, MnDOT Ann Rexine, Three Rivers Park District Community Working Group Plymouth Avenue/Wirth Park Station Rich Baker Tonia Galonska Ishmael Israel John Munger Naima Richmond LaShella Sims Dan Steinberg Andrea Wiley Golden Valley Road Station Winnie Brown Bobby Evans Sean Fahey Erv Heim Cynthia Hickman Nancy Huntley Alison Pence Gillian Rosenquist Lucretia Sudduth Cathy Waldhauser Debra Yahle Thank you to all participants of our engagement activities and open houses ACKNOWLEDGMENTS iv METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Station Area Planning TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION ..........................................................................1-1 Project Definition and Context ....................................................................................1-2 Definition of Station Area Planning ...........................................................................1-3 Purpose of Station Area Planning ...............................................................................1-4 Related Documents .........................................................................................................1-9 Plymouth Avenue/Wirth Park STATION AREA .......................2-1 Existing Conditions Analysis ........................................................................................2-2 Station Area Vision .........................................................................................................2-12 Implementation Framework ......................................................................................2-30 GOLDEN VALLEY ROAD STATION AREA ..................................3-1 Existing Conditions Analysis ........................................................................................3-2 Station Area Vision .........................................................................................................3-12 Implementation Framework ......................................................................................3-32 Glossary .......................................................................................A-1 City of Minneapolis and City of Golden Valley, Hennepin County v LIST OF FIGURES + TABLES INTRODUCTION ..........................................................................1-1 Figure 1.1: Regional Transitways .................................................................................1-2 Figure 1.2: METRO Blue Line Extension ....................................................................1-3 Figure 1.3: METRO Blue Line Extension Development Process .......................1-4 Figure 1.4: FTA New Starts Rating System ...............................................................1-5 Figure 1.5: Station Area Planning Schedule ............................................................1-7 Plymouth Avenue/Wirth Park STATION AREA .......................2-1 Table 2.1: Plymouth Avenue Community Profile ..................................................2-2 Figure 2.1: Plymouth Avenue/Wirth Park Station Area .......................................2-3 Figure 2.2: Average Life Expectancy at Birth by Census Tract in 2007...........2-4 Figure 2.3: Existing Streets and Highways ...............................................................2-5 Figure 2.4: Existing Transit Routes ..............................................................................2-6 Figure 2.5: Existing / Planned Sidewalks and Bikeways ......................................2-8 Figure 2.6: Existing Land Use ........................................................................................2-9 Figure 2.7: Existing / Planned Amenities and Destinations .............................2-11 Figure 2.8: Roadway Circulation Enhancements .................................................2-13 Figure 2.9: Pedestrian Circulation Enhancements ..............................................2-14 Figure 2.10: Bicycle Circulation Enhancements ...................................................2-15 Figure 2.11: Existing Comprehensive Plan Future Land Use ...........................2-18 Figure 2.12: Future Land Use Modifications..........................................................2-19 Figure 2.13: Future Land Use .....................................................................................2-20 Figure 2.14: Future Land Use (Parcel Basis) ...........................................................2-21 Figure 2.15: Development Intensity ........................................................................2-23 Figure 2.16: Public Realm Improvements .............................................................2-24 Figure 2.17: Representative Public Realm and Streetscape Improvements .......................................................................................................2-25 Figure 2.18: Plymouth Avenue Street Section .....................................................2-26 Table 2.2: Healthy Community Design Features .................................................2-29 Table 2.3: Day of Opening Improvements .............................................................2-31 Figure 2.19: Day of Opening Pedestrian Circulation Improvements ...........2-32 Figure 2.20: Day of Opening Bicycle Circulation Improvements ...................2-33 Figure 2.21: Day of Opening Public Realm Improvements..............................2-34 Table 2.4: Future Improvements ...............................................................................2-35 GOLDEN VALLEY ROAD STATION AREA ..................................3-1 Table 3.1: Golden Valley Road Community Profile ...............................................3-2 Figure 3.1: Golden Valley Road Station Area ...........................................................3-3 Figure 3.2: Existing Streets and Highways ...............................................................3-4 Figure 3.3: Existing Transit Routes ..............................................................................3-5 Figure 3.4: Golden Valley Road - Theodore Wirth Parkway Intersection.......3-6 Figure 3.5: Existing / Planned Sidewalks and Bikeways ......................................3-7 Figure 3.6: Existing Land Use ........................................................................................3-8 Figure 3.7: Existing / Planned Amenities and Destinations .............................3-10 Figure 3.8: Roadway Circulation Enhancements .................................................3-13 Figure 3.9: Pedestrian Circulation Enhancements ..............................................3-14 Figure 3.10: Bicycle Circulation Enhancements ...................................................3-15 Figure 3.11: City of Golden Valley Future Land Use - Transition Areas ........3-19 Figure 3.12: City of Minneapolis Existing Comprehensive Plan Future Land Use ............................................................................................................................3-20 Figure 3.13: City of Minneapolis Future Land Use Modifications ..................3-21 vi METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Station Area Planning LIST OF FIGURES + TABLES Figure 3.14: City of Minneapolis Future Land Use ..............................................3-22 Figure 3.15: City of Minneapolis Future Land Use (Parcel Basis)....................3-23 Figure 3.16: City of Minneapolis Development Intensity .................................3-24 Figure 3.17: Public Realm Improvements ..............................................................3-26 Figure 3.18: Representative Public Realm and Streetscape Improvements .......................................................................................................3-27 Figure 3.19: Golden Valley Road Street Section (West of Xerxes Avenue) ....................................................................................3-29 Table 3.2: Healthy Community Design Features .................................................3-31 Table 3.3: Day of Opening Improvements .............................................................3-34 Figure 3.20: Day of Opening Roadway Circulation Improvements ..............3-35 Figure 3.21: Day of Opening Pedestrian Circulation Improvements ...........3-36 Figure 3.22: Day of Opening Bicycle Circulation Improvements ...................3-37 Figure 3.23: Day of Opening Public Realm Improvements..............................3-38 Table 3.4: Future Improvements ...............................................................................3-39 INTRODUCTION 1. Project Definition and Context 2. Definition of Station Area Planning 3. Purpose of Station Area Planning 4. Station Area Planning Process and Approach 5. Related Documents 1 1-2 METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Station Area Planning Project Definition and Context The METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau Light Rail Transit (LRT)) project is a proposed 13-mile addition to the existing METRO Blue Line and will extend from downtown Minneapolis through north Minneapolis, Golden Valley, Robbinsdale, Crystal, and Brooklyn Park, serving the northwest Twin Cities metro area as shown in Figure 1.1. The METRO Blue Line Extension will link to local and express bus routes at its planned stations, and seamlessly connect to the region’s system of transitways at Target Field Station in downtown Minneapolis. As currently proposed, the METRO Blue Line Extension will build up to 11 new stations: • Two stations in Minneapolis: Van White Boulevard and Penn Avenue • One or two stations in Golden Valley: Plymouth Avenue and/or Golden Valley Road • One station in Robbinsdale: Robbinsdale (at 42nd Avenue) • One station in Crystal: Bass Lake Road • Five stations in Brooklyn Park: 63rd Avenue, Brooklyn Boulevard, 85th Avenue, 93rd Avenue, and Oak Grove Parkway In an effort to use project resources effectively, Hennepin County divided the METRO Blue Line Extension station area planning process into two phases. Phase One is the subject of these plans and covers the four stations in Minneapolis and Golden Valley. Phase One station area plans are presented in two documents. One report addresses the Van White Boulevard and Penn Avenue INTRODUCTION Figure 1.1: Regional Transitways This map shows the extension of the Blue Line through North Minneapolis, Golden Valley, Robbinsdale, Crystal and Brooklyn Park. City of Minneapolis and City of Golden Valley, Hennepin County 1-3 station areas in Minneapolis. This report addresses the Plymouth Avenue and Golden Valley Road station areas, each of which falls partially in the cities of Golden Valley and Minneapolis. Phase Two is underway and will cover the balance of the stations in Robbinsdale, Crystal, and Brooklyn Park. Phase Two station area plans will be available at a later date. As noted above and in Figure 1.2, Metro Transit plans to build either the Plymouth Avenue or the Golden Valley Road Station or both stations. Selection of a station will occur during the Blue Line Extension Project Development phase. To inform this selection, and to keep the decision unbiased, Hennepin County and the Cities of Minneapolis and Golden Valley elected to prepare full station area plans for both stations. Definition of Station Area Planning Station area planning is a process by which county and city staff work together with community members to establish a plan for the area surrounding a proposed transit station. Station area plans typically cover the area within a 1/2 mile radius or a ten minute walk of the station. During the station area planning process community members discuss issues, needs, desires, and priorities, and set a vision for the future look and feel of the area that creates a context for the station in the community. Station area planning results in a list of recommended actions for agencies and local communities that contribute toward realization of the vision. Figure 1.2: METRO Blue Line Extension *Section of a Golden Valley Road station, Plymouth Avenue/Wirth Park Station, or retention of both stations will be made in the future based on information from environmental impact review, engineering, and public involvement. Blue Line Extension Bottineau LRT This map shows which station area planning phase the various METRO Blue Line Extension stations are addressed in. 1-4 METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Station Area Planning Recognizing that transportation systems and the characteristics of our neighborhoods have a substantial impact on community health and that populations within the Bottineau corridor experience significant disparities in health outcomes, Hennepin County incorporated health considerations as a special area of focus in station area planning. Purpose of Station Area Planning Station area planning is one step in a larger transportation development project, as depicted in Figure 1.3. The Phase One Station Area Planning process is a joint effort of Hennepin County Bottineau LRT Community Works, Hennepin County Regional Railroad Authority, and the Cities of Minneapolis and Golden Valley. The purpose of Station Area Planning is to create land use and transitway supportive plans centered on the proposed Bottineau LRT transit stations. These plans examine transportation and circulation issues, urban design and placemaking, and public realm infrastructure so as to help maintain and create healthy, great neighborhoods and high quality transit-oriented development. These plans cover the area within a half mile of a transit station, but concentrate on the area within a 10 minute walk. The purpose of the Station Area Planning process is threefold: First: To provide an opportunity for dialogue with station area residents, members of the business community, agency staff, and elected and appointed officials regarding land use concepts and ideas, infrastructure improvements, and whether changes are recommended to city, county, and regional plans, policies, and ordinances. The station area plans will be adopted as part of the comprehensive plans of the partner cities. The station area plans provide guidance for the cities in designating land uses, making infrastructure investments, and developing and providing community services. The maps, goals, and policies of the plan provide the framework for adoption of regulations, programs, and services to implement the plan and help prepare for the METRO Blue Line Extension as a major infrastructure investment. Second: To improve the METRO Blue Line Extension project’s likelihood of receiving federal funding. The METRO Blue Line Extension project is competing with transitway projects across the country for Federal Transit Administration (FTA) New Starts funds, which could pay for up to 50 percent of the capital costs of the project. Proposed New Starts projects are evaluated and rated according to local financial commitment and project justification criteria set forth in the federal Figure 1.3: METRO Blue Line Extension Development Process City of Minneapolis and City of Golden Valley, Hennepin County 1-5 transportation bill, Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century (MAP-21) and are shown in Figure 1.41. Of the six project justification criteria, two criteria, economic development effects and land use, are based almost entirely on local plans and policies, as well as the physical character of station areas. Station area planning therefore has the potential to increase the project’s rating and its likelihood of funding and implementation. Ratings on additional criteria (mobility and cost) can also benefit from station area planning, as these ratings are affected by the number of people who will be served by and ride the LRT line. Planning around stations is the first step in allocating growth to station areas, eventually increasing the population near stations and in turn increasing ridership on the LRT line. Finally, the station area planning process builds capacity within community members and agency staff to fully participate in the Hennepin County Bottineau LRT Community Works program, as well as the project development process for the LRT line. Bottineau LRT Community Works is a partnership of Hennepin County, the corridor cities, and Metropolitan Council/Metro Transit to coordinate planning and make effective investments in the station areas that foster transit-oriented development, pedestrian and bicycle accessibility, job growth, neighborhood vitality, and unique places in the corridor. Station Area Planning Process and Approach Process The station area planning process proceeded in five phases: pre-planning; inventory and analysis; concept alternatives; preferred alternative and implementation recommendations and development of the final station area plans. Pre-Planning To provide Bottineau Corridor stakeholders with a foundation of objective information for future station area planning efforts, two planning efforts were undertaken prior to actively working on station area plans. A pre-planning study documented some best 1As of August 2013, FTA’s interim policy is to assign 50 percent weight to the summary project justification rating and 50 percent weight to the summary local financial commitment rating to arrive at an overall rating for the project. FTA requires at least a medium rating on both measures to obtain a medium or better rating overall. Figure 1.4: FTA New Starts Rating System 1-6 METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Station Area Planning practices for transit-oriented development (TOD) and community engagement, established a corridor-wide vision and suggested station typologies. In recognition of the relationship between transportation decision making and health outcomes, Hennepin County undertook a health impact assessment (HIA) of the transitway. This effort is similar to an environmental impact assessment, but considers the impact of a project on community health. The HIA found that: • The Bottineau Transitway has the potential to improve health in the region by influencing multiple factors that shape health. • Enhancements to land uses surrounding the station areas could greatly advance the LRT line’s impact on health. • The degree to which these health promoting benefits reach communities experiencing health disparities, such as minority and low-income populations, will depend on measures to ensure their access to the LRT. HIA recommendations for station area planning included: • Engage populations living in the Bottineau Corridor during station area planning and incorporating engagement strategies to reach traditionally underrepresented groups such as low-income, minority, immigrant, and non- English speaking populations. • Focus Bottineau Corridor cities’ residential and commercial growth to the station areas and implement zoning, parking requirements, and building codes that encourage higher density, mixed-use development that will benefit current and future communities. • Incorporate pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure improvements into station area plans to improve traffic safety and facilitate access to the transit stations by foot and bike. • Preserve existing affordable housing and support the development of affordable and mixed-income housing near transit locations using strategies that have been successful for other transit-related investments throughout the U.S. Inventory and Analysis – Spring and Summer 2014 This phase included collection of data and an in-depth analysis of several topics. Results of the following inventory and analysis can be found in Chapter 2, Part 1: Existing Conditions Analysis unless otherwise noted. Access and Circulation • An analysis of the connections between modes at each station; bus, bicycle, and pedestrian access to the station; and missing links in pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure • High-level consideration of traffic-related issues and traffic generating locations • An in-depth look at the pedestrian environment on Olson Memorial Highway, including the possibility for a parallel trail, north-south pedestrian connections across the highway, exploration of crossing scenarios, as well as pedestrian and bicycle crossings above-, below-, and at-grade with the highway • Examination of on and off-street parking options and parameters near the stations Existing and Future Land Use • Mapping of existing land use in each of the station areas Amenities and Destinations • Inventory and mapping of local amenities and destinations, including major developments, healthcare, civic, and educational destinations, as well as parks and historic properties and districts Economic Development Results of the economic development inventory and analysis can be found at the station area market analysis link on page 1-10. • A quantitative and qualitative evaluation of development capacity in each of the station areas including large sites and those in public ownership • In-person interviews with local developers, community members, business owners, and organizational leaders regarding current real estate dynamics and opportunities City of Minneapolis and City of Golden Valley, Hennepin County 1-7 Figure 1.5: Station Area Planning Schedule 1-8 METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Station Area Planning • An evaluation of opportunities for retail, general commercial, and office development at the neighborhood, community, and sub-region scale, as well as potential opportunities for civic, educational, and healthcare uses • Gathering of baseline demographic information, with metrics such as household size, incomes, age, and educational attainment Housing Markets Results of the housing inventory and analysis can be found at the station area market analysis link on page 1-10. • Documentation of the market dynamics driving residential development (achievable price points, land values, density, and absorption), and links between current and future housing typologies and developable land, in order to generate a picture of the station area in the short and long terms • An inventory of existing housing conditions, including the scale of existing development, and affordability mix • Use of housing-related data as well as the reports and perceptions of community residents and other stakeholders to outline the housing needs of communities near the stations • An evaluation of current and projected market conditions for housing development to estimate the rents that would be achievable in new developments by housing type, and the populations and households that might be target markets for new housing development Future Character • Statements shaped through the community engagement process that communicate each station’s assets and values and set the vision that will guide future development in the station area Concept Alternatives – Fall and Winter 2014 The concept alternatives encompass the information gathered during the inventory and analysis phase and illustrate a range of development options for each station, as well as potential infrastructure improvements. Preferred Alternative and Implementation Recommendations – Winter 2015 Each station’s preferred alternative concept is consistent with its station area character statement and incorporates recommended circulation and public realm enhancements. To facilitate adoption into each city’s comprehensive plan, the preferred concept alternative is presented as a future land use plan. Recommendations are based on the results of the analysis, conceptual station area layouts, assessment of development financial feasibility, and extensive community engagement. Recommendations are presented for each station in phases: pre-transitway (2013 - 2020), and post-transitway (2020 - 2030). The implementation plan includes mutually agreed-on roles and responsibilities for both public agencies and community stakeholders. Final Station Area Plans – Spring 2015 This document is a record of the community engagement process, along with the results of technical analyses, as well as the final station concept, future land use plan maps, and corresponding recommendations and implementation plan. For the station area planning timeline, please see Figure 1.5. Public Engagement throughout the Station Area Planning Process Robust public engagement was central to development of the station area plans, and the plans reflect input from a wide variety of residents, business community members, community organizations, and government agencies. A variety of methods were used to engage people throughout the project; detail is provided in the sections below. Community Engagement The METRO Blue Line Extension Station Area Planning process began with a concerted effort to identify and invite people who live, work, or are otherwise interested in the station areas to join a Community Working Group, a group of community members that met monthly throughout the planning process to generate ideas, review drawings, maps, and documents, and provide direction on broader station area planning outreach efforts. Seven Community Working Group meetings were held over the course of the planning process, while three open houses were held at critical junctures to share information and gather input from a broader group of people. Community Working Group meetings City of Minneapolis and City of Golden Valley, Hennepin County 1-9 were open to the public and were well attended by members. Open houses were thoroughly advertised on the Bottineau LRT Community Works email list, website, and noticed in public places and via community and neighborhood organizations. Open houses were very well attended, with more than 150 participants at each event. In addition, city, county, and consultant staff met with many other stakeholders in small- group and one-on- one topical meetings, and conducted interviews with a broad cross-section of key stakeholders, as well as developers in the corridor and region. Health Equity and Engagement Cohort In 2013, Hennepin County published the Bottineau Health Impact Assessment (HIA), which documented dramatic economic, environmental, and social inequalities in the Bottineau Corridor compared to the rest of the region. These inequalities result in lower life expectancy, poor health outcomes, and more traffic fatalities in the corridor. The METRO Blue Line Extension project offers an opportunity to begin improving health in nearby communities. As follow up to the HIA and in parallel to the station area planning process, Hennepin County initiated an engagement process specifically aimed at integrating health equity principles into Bottineau Station Area Planning. The Health Equity and Engagement Cohort formed in 2014 and is comprised of representatives from Northside Residents Redevelopment Council, Harrison Neighborhood Association, Heritage Park Neighborhood Association, Comunidades Latinas Unidas en Servicio (CLUES), CAPI USA (formerly Center for Asian and Pacific Islanders), Lao Assistance Center of Minnesota, Redeemer Center for Life, and Masjid An- Nur. The cohort has provided input to the station area planning process, and many individual members of the organizations listed above have participated in the process, as well. Agency Engagement A Technical Advisory Committee comprised of representatives from each of the affected agencies met eight times throughout the project to review and provide comment and direction on both technical information and community engagement methods. TAC members engaged in difficult conversations to reconcile the differing priorities of their agencies, all of which retain an interest in the success of the METRO Blue Line Extension and its stations. TAC members also participated in a design charrette, an intense all-day meeting with the purpose of identifying preferred land uses, solidifying preferred alternatives, and discussing potential implementation strategies. For a timeline of community and agency engagement efforts, please see Figure 1.5. Related Documents Previous Studies As part of the station area planning process, plans that provided city-wide policy guidance, such as Comprehensive Plans, were consulted. In addition, policy documents developed by the Metropolitan Council and Hennepin County were also consulted for applicable policy direction. The studies referenced below each informed the station area planning process. A short description of each is provided, along with a brief synopsis of the information the study provided to the METRO Blue Line Extension Station Area Planning process. Bottineau Transitway Draft Environmental Impact Statement Published in April 2014, the Bottineau Transitway Draft Environmental Impact Statement describes the transportation and environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of an LRT project to improve transit service in the northwest part of the region. The Bottineau Draft EIS provided information about LRT design, placement of LRT components and potential impacts of the line that was used to inform the station area plans. Theodore Wirth Regional Park Bottineau Transitway Design Forum In February 2013, the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board sponsored the Theodore Wirth Regional Park Bottineau Transitway Design Forum to explore the relationship between the LRT project and the park. The outcome of the forum is a series of concepts that illustrate potential solutions to the issues and opportunities presented by LRT adjacent to the east side of the park. The station area planning process further explored many of the ideas raised during the Design Forum. 1-10 METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Station Area Planning Bottineau Transitway Station Area Pre- Planning Study Published in February 2013, the purpose of the Bottineau Transtiway Station Area Pre-Planning Study is to provide Bottineau Corridor stakeholders with a foundation of objective information for future station area planning efforts. As a pre-planning study, it does not describe where and how change should occur. Rather, it establishes some best practices for TOD, establishes a corridor-wide vision, and suggests station typologies. The vision and station typologies proposed in the Pre-Planning Study were used to arrive at the character statements for each station. Bassett Creek Regional Trail CSAH 66/Golden Valley Road Segment Feasibility Study The City of Golden Valley initiated the Bassett Creek Regional Trail CSAH 66/Golden Valley Road Segment Feasibility Study to understand the opportunities and impacts that developing the Bassett Creek Regional Trail along the CSAH 66 corridor through Golden Valley might have on the property owners and resources of the City. The Feasibility Study was used as a reference for understanding of the location and potential for the Regional Trail. Bottineau Transitway Health Impact Assessment In recognition of the relationship between transportation decision making and health outcomes, Hennepin County published the Bottineau Transitway Health Impact Assessment (HIA) in December 2013. The HIA provides recommendations for advancing the transitway’s positive health impacts and is intended to help stakeholders consider health as they make decisions and participate in the next phases of the Bottineau Transitway project. The HIA informed community engagement efforts and to consideration of health outcomes throughout the station area planning process. Concurrent Studies Several studies were underway at the same time at METRO Blue Line Extension Station Area Planning. Information from these efforts was coordinated as needed. Theodore Wirth Regional Park Master Plan Published in February 2015, the Theodore Wirth Regional Park Master Plan documents current park data and analysis, communicates a plan for the park’s future, and guides strategic implementation of the plan over the next 20 years. It serves as a “memory” for decision- making, by reminding future residents, park visitors, and staff of the rationale behind the vision for the park and the recommended improvements. The Master Plan was used as a reference document for understanding of the Park’s future and its facilities as they relate to the Penn, Plymouth and Golden Valley Road Stations. Conceptual Sochaki Park, Mary Hills, and Rice Lake Nature Area Planning Three Rivers Park District is collaborating with the Cities of Robbinsdale and Golden Valley to identify potential capital projects and natural resource and programming initiatives in Sochacki Park and the Mary Hills and Rice Lake Nature Areas. This planning process highlighted the need for a new trail connection between Mary Hills Nature Area and Bassett Creek Regional Trail/Theodore Wirth Park, which is reiterated in the Golden Valley Station Area Plan. Penn Avenue Vision and Implementation Framework The Penn Avenue Community Works Corridor Vision and Implementation Framework is a Hennepin County- led effort to develop an integrated community-based vision and a coordinated, long-term implementation framework to guide future inter-agency efforts and investments in multimodal transportation, land use, economic development, housing, and placemaking along Penn Avenue North between the METRO Green Line Extension station just south of I-394, to 44th Avenue North. Information gathered as part of the Penn Avenue Community Works research and community engagement informed the development potential, community character, and circulation aspects of the Penn Avenue and Plymouth Avenue/Wirth Park Station Area Plans. North Minneapolis Greenway: Technical Investigation Progress Report Prepared in June 2014 by the City of Minneapolis, the North Minneapolis Greenway: Technical investigation Progress Report documents a proposed 3.5-mile greenway route extending from the intersection of Humboldt Avenue N and 47th Avenue N to the intersection of Irving Avenue N and 16th Avenue N. Several alternative routes were identified between 16th Avenue N and Glenwood Avenue that were taken into consideration during station area planning. City of Minneapolis and City of Golden Valley, Hennepin County 1-11 METRO Blue Line Extension Project Development In August 2014, the Federal Transit Administration approved the METRO Blue Line Extension for entry into the Project Development (also referred to as the Project Development) phase of the project. Metro Transit is currently leading design of the LRT project, in partnership with FTA, Hennepin County, and the corridor cities. Supporting Reports/Memoranda Over the course of the project, supporting reports and technical memoranda were developed on specific topics. These documents can be accessed as separate Appendices. Station Area Market Analysis The Station Area Market Analysis report titled, Place Based Economic Development and Market Analysis, provides a realistic understanding of the types of real estate (housing, retail, offices, and employment) that are likely to be feasible within the four station areas over the coming two decades, and to identify key “development opportunity sites” within each of the four station areas. Stakeholder Engagement Memorandum The Stakeholder Engagement Memorandum describes community engagement efforts throughout the station area planning process, outlines issues and themes expressed, and documents how the planning documents and overall process were shaped by community input. Golden Valley Road Parking Management Strategy Assessment The Golden Valley Road Parking Management Strategy Assessment synthesizes parking discussions held throughout the station area planning process and provides a tool for City of Golden Valley staff and policy-makers to engage in education and discussion regarding parking strategies at the Golden Valley Road Station. Estimated Infrastructure Construction Costs Estimated construction costs were prepared for infrastructure improvement projects recommended in the final station area plans. PLYMOUTH AVENUE/WIRTH PARK STATION AREA 1. Existing Conditions Analysis 2. Station Area Vision 3. Implementation Framework 2 2-2 METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Plymouth Avenue / Wirth Park Station Area Planning The proposed Plymouth Avenue/Wirth Park Station is located on the east side of Theodore Wirth Regional Park, at the intersection of Plymouth Avenue and the BNSF Railway. The station area extends one-half mile around each proposed light rail transit (LRT) station, or the distance the average person can walk to/from the station in ten minutes. One-half mile is the transit industry standard for the maximum length that people are willing to walk to reach a transitway station. While a one-half mile is equated with a ten-minute walk, in reality this does not always hold true on the ground as factors such as terrain and the transportation network affects how people move through the station area. Please see Figure 2.1 for a map of the station location, half-mile radius, and ten-minute walk extent. Relationship to Community Health The Plymouth Avenue/Wirth Park Station Area is shared by residents in Minneapolis and Golden Valley. Minneapolis residents in this station area experience disparities in health outcomes such as chronic disease and life expectancy, as is evident from Figure 2.2. Additionally, Table 2.1 demonstrates that 27 percent of residents in this station area are living below the federal poverty level2 and that there is a concentration of youth and of senior citizens. These vulnerable populations are less likely to be able to drive cars and often experience disparities in access to healthy foods, education, and jobs, compared to the rest of the region. The Plymouth Avenue/Wirth Park Station Area Plan recommends filling in sidewalk and trail gaps to increase access for people walking and biking to the station. Some limited small-scale commercial development as mentioned in the plans at the intersection of Penn and Plymouth Avenues which could result in walkable destinations for residents. Additionally, the METRO Blue Line Extension and Plymouth Avenue/Wirth Park Station have the potential to positively impact health all along the line by providing convenient access to Theodore Wirth Park. Increased access to outdoor space and extensive programming that takes place in this large park provides opportunities for transit-dependent populations to be physically active. Existing Conditions Analysis Roadways As shown in Figure 2.3, Plymouth Avenue is a low- volume, two-lane, local street owned and maintained by the City of Minneapolis. Approximately 4,800 vehicles used Plymouth Avenue near the station on a daily basis in 2012 and parking is allowed on both sides of the street. Plymouth Avenue spans the BNSF Railway and is a major entrance point to Theodore Wirth Regional Park, connecting to the Theodore Wirth Parkway, and the Wirth Chalet. Primary Community Input Several community members expressed concern about increased street parking due to transit riders driving to the station area and parking on neighborhood streets. PLYMOUTH AVENUE/WIRTH PARK STATION AREA Half-Mile Station Area Minneapolis Golden Valley Hennepin County Population (2010)3,382 382,578 20,371 1,152,388 Persons under 18 years 31%20.2%19.9%22.4% Persons over 65 years 10%8.0%20.3%12.2% Minority 80%36.2%14.6%23.6% Zero car households 14%19%5.7%10.5% Living in poverty 27%22.5%6.8%12.8% Data sources: U.S. Census (2010); American Community Survey 2007-2011 5-year summary file Table 2.1: Plymouth Avenue Community Profile 2Living in poverty is defined as populations living in households whose income is at or below the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services poverty thresholds. As a reference, this threshold was $22,300 in 2010 for a family of four. Minority is defined as non- white. City of Minneapolis and City of Golden Valley, Hennepin County 2-3 Figure 2.1: Plymouth Avenue/Wirth Park Station Area This map shows the half mile buffer and 10 minute walking extent for the station area. 2-4 METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Plymouth Avenue / Wirth Park Station Area Planning Transit Local Routes 7 and 32 operate on Plymouth Avenue in the station area. Both routes terminate at the Theodore Wirth Regional Park Chalet just west of the station. The Route 7 is regular local bus route, providing all day service to the station location, as shown in Figure 2.4. Local Route 32 also serves the station but operates just once in the morning and once in the afternoon, on weekdays while school is session, as this branch of Route 32 operates to serve students bound for Edison High School. Due to the very limited service this route offers, it is not included in Figure 2.4. The proposed C Line Arterial Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) service will operate on Penn Avenue just outside the station area; a station is planned at the intersection of Penn and Plymouth Avenues. Primary Community Input Bus service along Plymouth Avenue is not high- frequency and operates every 30 minutes throughout the day, making convenient transfers to or from LRT more difficult. Bikeways and Sidewalks Sidewalk infrastructure in the station area is consistent with the regular urban street grid, with sidewalks on both sides of local and arterial streets. Sidewalks along local streets are separated from the roadway by a planted boulevard with grass, street trees, or landscaping. Street lights along Plymouth and Theodore Wirth Parkway are oriented to automobiles only; no pedestrian-scale lighting is present. Gaps in the sidewalk network are present in several of the residential blocks closest to Theodore Figure 2.2: Average Life Expectancy at Birth by Census Tract in 2007 City of Minneapolis and City of Golden Valley, Hennepin County 2-5 Figure 2.3: Existing Streets and Highways This map depicts roadway jurisdictions, roadway classifications, and existing and forecasted traffic volumes. Note: The City of Minneapolis defines a Community Corridor as primarily residential with intermittent commercial uses clustered at intersection nodes. 2-6 METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Plymouth Avenue / Wirth Park Station Area Planning Figure 2.4: Existing Transit Routes Olson Memorial Hwy This map depicts existing bus routes and planned arterial BRT routes. City of Minneapolis and City of Golden Valley, Hennepin County 2-7 Wirth Regional Park, most critically on the south side of Plymouth Avenue between Xerxes and Washburn Avenues. Bicycle infrastructure in the station area serves east- west users fairly well with on-street lanes on Plymouth Avenue. On-street bikeways are also planned for Oak Park Avenue. North-south users are served by trails in Theodore Wirth Regional Park that are in close proximity to the proposed station platform. However, these trails are located on the other side of the BNSF Railway tracks. Fencing planned between the LRT line and BNSF Railway will prohibit a direct pedestrian connection from the platform to these trails. Though there are no north-south on-street bike lanes in the station area, an on-street bikeway is planned on Thomas Avenue North. See Figure 2.5 for existing and planned sidewalks and bikeways. Primary Community Input Community members who participated in engagement activities expressed a strong preference for the LRT platform to be located on the north side of Plymouth Avenue. Many of the transit users who use this station are expected to go to Theodore Wirth Regional Park. If the platform is located north of Plymouth Avenue, Xerxes Avenue would separate the proposed platform from residential housing that faces onto Xerxes Avenue. This enhances the public visibility to the station. In contrast, south of Plymouth Avenue, the platform would be located adjacent to a thickly wooded hillside behind residential back yards making the proposed platform area feel secluded. Some community members expressed safety concerns if the platform was located south of Plymouth Avenue. A safe and well-lit access to the grade-separated platform is critical because of its location below street level. Accommodations for people with sporting equipment (bicycles, skis, golf clubs) should be incorporated into the design of the station so that it is useful as a park destination. Examples of this include an elevator sized large enough to accommodate bicycles, skies, and other recreation equipment and stairs with built in bicycle track. Neighborhood residents east of Theodore Wirth Regional Park currently use many informal paths across the existing freight rail tracks into Wirth Park that will be no longer accessible when LRT is constructed. While done, these are not legal crossings of the railroad. Community members were not pleased about the prospect of losing these connections. See Figure 2.5 for a map of informal routes used today and distances to existing grade-separated crossings. Land Use Land uses in the Plymouth Avenue/Wirth Park station area are depicted in Figure 2.6. The land use map was created from data received from the Metropolitan Council (2010). The land uses shown on this map represent a period in time and may not exactly match actual land uses or the Cities’ existing land use maps. Please note that while it provides project context, it is not the official land use map for the cities of Minneapolis or Golden Valley. The western half of the Plymouth Avenue/Wirth Park Station area is in the City of Golden Valley. Land uses in Golden Valley are predominantly single family, with a non profit organization and parkland located in close proximity to the station. The eastern half of the station area is largely in the City of Minneapolis, in neighborhoods of older single family homes. Over half of these homes were built in the 1920s or earlier. The blocks on the south side of Plymouth Avenue are considered to be in the potential Homewood Historic District, which has been determined to be potentially worthy of historic designation. The size of the lots in Homewood are atypically large by Minneapolis standards, and there are homes along the park perimeter that are truly grand. The vast majority of these homes are owner occupied. The area to the north of Plymouth Avenue is a mix of owner occupied and rental housing. Lot sizes are more typical for Minneapolis. Single family homes still predominate, although some blocks have a duplex or two. Apartments are scarce in the station area, with just three multifamily properties along Plymouth Avenue. There is also little commercial development in the station area. The only exceptions are an institutional property on the park side of Xerxes Avenue, and some businesses and nonprofit offices along Plymouth Avenue in the few blocks closest to the Penn Avenue intersection. The Penn and Plymouth intersection is an important neighborhood commercial node at the eastern edge of the study area. It offers a major health care facility, NorthPoint Health and Wellness Center, owned and operated by Hennepin County in partnership with a community board of directors. The University of Minnesota’s UROC (Urban Research and Outreach-Engagement Center) facility, and the Minneapolis Urban League are also important community-based institutions at Plymouth and Penn. 2-8 METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Plymouth Avenue / Wirth Park Station Area Planning Figure 2.5: Existing / Planned Sidewalks and Bikeways This map shows existing sidewalks and bikeways, along with identified sidewalk gaps, planned sidewalks and planned bikeways previously identified in city policy documents. City of Minneapolis and City of Golden Valley, Hennepin County 2-9 Figure 2.6: Existing Land Use This map shows existing land uses with data received from the Metropolitan Council (2010). 2-10 METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Plymouth Avenue / Wirth Park Station Area Planning There is potential for additional development at the node, with 2.2 acres of City-owned property at the southeast and southwest corners of the Plymouth/ Penn intersection. One of these sites is being pursued for the development of a grocery store (Praxis Grocery). There are a few vacant properties in the blocks north of Plymouth Avenue. They are generally not in locations near or along the Plymouth Avenue corridor where City policy might be supportive of increased development density, but they would be suitable for the development of new single family homes. Community Character The Plymouth Avenue/Wirth Park Station will serve the Willard Hay neighborhood, Theodore Wirth Regional Park users and nearby amenities and destinations as depicted on Figure 2.7. The primary feature of the station area is Theodore Wirth Regional Park, just west of the station platform. The Theodore Wirth Chalet is within 1,000 feet of the proposed station and a planned Park Welcome Center will be approximately 2,000 feet from the station. Transit users exiting at the Plymouth Avenue/Wirth Park Station will have convenient access to numerous year-round activities, such as golfing, mountain biking, Nordic skiing, along with tubing, sledding and snowboarding. The station area is an urban neighborhood with low potential for change given the presence of Theodore Wirth Regional Park and stable neighborhoods east of the station, including the potential Homewood Historic District. The station area is home to several religious, civic, and health organizations but is mostly a single- family residential neighborhood. With an approximate station area population of 3,700, the station will be an origin for riders who will arrive on foot or by bus or bicycle, and a destination for many users bound for the multitude of recreational opportunities available at Theodore Wirth Regional Park. Primary Community Input Community members who participated in engagement activities are satisfied with the current character of the neighborhood and are generally not seeking new development or displacement of the stable housing in the neighborhood. To this end, neighborhood residents want the station to fit in with the existing neighborhood character and park setting and raised some concerns regarding increased street parking on the neighborhood streets. Community members pointed out that the area near the station is on the edge of the park, gets very dark, and can feel unsafe, especially at night. Lighting and security cameras are necessary, as well as wayfinding. Finally, residents embrace the park as a major asset in their neighborhood, and felt that station design should be low-impact and done with respect to nearby wetlands and in coordination with the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board. City of Minneapolis and City of Golden Valley, Hennepin County 2-11 Figure 2.7: Existing / Planned Amenities and Destinations This map identifies amenities and destinations located in the station area. 2-12 METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Plymouth Avenue / Wirth Park Station Area Planning Station Area Vision Future Station Area Character The Plymouth Avenue/Wirth Park Station area is envisioned as: • The METRO Blue Line’s recreation-oriented destination station that welcomes people to Theodore Wirth Regional Park; • A walkable area with historic residential architecture nearby; and • A community poised for future neighborhood- scale commercial activity at the intersection of Penn and Plymouth Avenues. Because of the destination character of the station, community members have suggested that a more fitting name for the station may be the “Wirth Park Station”. This vision statement can be used as a guide for city staff and community members as they evaluate future development proposals to ensure that new development is consistent with and supportive of the desired community character for this station area. Circulation Roadways A location for vehicular drop-offs of transit riders should be provided at the Plymouth Station. Modifications of the street curb lines to create special bays or restrictions to on-street parking may be necessary to allow passenger drop-off near the intersection of Plymouth Avenue and Xerxes Avenue. This space is intended for very short term use as LRT passengers exit or enter vehicles. Buses making connections to the METRO Blue Line Extension Plymouth Avenue/Wirth Park Station are envisioned to terminate at the Theodore Wirth Chalet, or possibly the proposed future Welcome Center. The Theodore Wirth Regional Park Master Plan includes a recommendation to rehabilitate the grounds in the foreground of the Wirth Chalet including redesigned parking, circulation, and landscaping. This may provide an opportunity to consider intersection modifications that can best meet park needs and circulation needs for all modes of transportation. See Figure 2.8 for a map of roadway circulation enhancements. Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities Though the LRT platform will be close to a north- south trail in Theodore Wirth Regional Park, the station platform and park trail are separated by freight rail tracks that will not be crossable. Therefore, pedestrians and bicycles leaving the station are envisioned to cross over to the west side the LRT line and freight rail via the Plymouth Avenue bridge and then take a path down to a new pedestrian bridge over Bassett Creek to reach the park trail. See Figure 2.9 and Figure 2.10 for details. A Nice Ride station is proposed to provide connections to neighborhoods east and west of the station. The station platform should be located north of Plymouth Avenue as this location will provide a location that enhances users’ sense of personal safety. In addition to an elevator and stairs that will be incorporated into the station platform, a safe, well-lit, comfortable and convenient ground plane transition from street level down to the LRT platform will be an important factor in the success of the Plymouth Avenue/ Wirth Park Station. The area where the ground plane changes elevation should accommodate Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) compliant movement for both pedestrians and bicyclists. The following improvements should be considered at locations where pedestrians and bicyclists are expected to cross higher volume roadways, such as Plymouth Avenue, Penn Avenue and Olson Memorial Highway. All Intersections • Median island pedestrian refuges or curb extensions • Improved intersection and pedestrian realm lighting • Crossing signage • ADA-compliant pedestrian ramps Signalized Intersections • High visibility crosswalk markings and signs • Traffic signal timing modifications to provide adequate crossing time for pedestrians • Countdown timers that allow pedestrians to make informed decisions whether there is adequate time to safely cross the roadway. • ADA-compliant signals Non-signalized Intersections • Rapid flashing beacons There are several critical gaps in the sidewalk network in the station area. Sidewalks should be added on the south side of Plymouth Avenue and Theodore City of Minneapolis and City of Golden Valley, Hennepin County 2-13 Figure 2.8: Roadway Circulation Enhancements Olson Memorial Hwy This map shows recommended roadway enhancements in the station area to better support station area livability and LRT station access. Due to ongoing discussions regarding design, development, and treatment of Olson Memorial Highway, additional guidance for this area will be added to Minneapolis’ plan at a later date before adoption Olson Memorial Hwy 2-14 METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Plymouth Avenue / Wirth Park Station Area Planning Figure 2.9: Pedestrian Circulation Enhancements Olson Memorial Hwy This map shows recommended pedestrian circulation enhancement to better support station area livability and LRT station access. Due to ongoing discussions regarding design, development, and treatment of Olson Memorial Highway, additional guidance for this area will be added to Minneapolis’ plan at a later date before adoption City of Minneapolis and City of Golden Valley, Hennepin County 2-15 Figure 2.10: Bicycle Circulation Enhancements Olson Memorial Hwy This map shows recommended bicycle circulation enhancement to better support station area livability and LRT station access. Due to ongoing discussions regarding design, development, and treatment of Olson Memorial Highway, additional guidance for this area will be added to Minneapolis’ plan at a later date before adoption 2-16 METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Plymouth Avenue / Wirth Park Station Area Planning Wirth Parkway from Washburn Avenue to a proposed future pedestrian bridge that will connect to the park’s Welcome Center. Sidewalk gap closures are also proposed along the west side of Xerxes Avenue between Plymouth Avenue and Golden Valley Road, and along 8th Avenue and Oak Park Avenue near Vincent Avenue. For a map of envisioned pedestrian and bicycle circulation enhancements, see Figure 2.9 and Figure 2.10. Transit Routes 7 and 32 will continue to serve the station. Stops may be shifted slightly to facilitate a more direct transfer from LRT to bus. Prior to LRT service starting operations, Metro Transit will evaluate the bus routes and make modifications as necessary to best support convenient transit connections. As depicted in Figure 2.9 and Figure 2.10, a short segment of curb-abutting street space will be reserved for bus stops near the intersection of Plymouth Avenue and Xerxes Avenue. The bus stops could be located within the existing street in an area of restricted parking or the street curb lines could be modified to create a special drop-off/pick-up bay. Future Development The Plymouth Avenue/Wirth Park Station is in a park- like setting at the edge of a distinctive single family neighborhood, with the neighborhood areas on the south side of Plymouth Avenue being deemed potentially worthy of historic designation. The transit station will bring transit connectivity to the nearby neighborhood, and to north Minneapolis households to the east of the immediate area through a bus connection down Plymouth Avenue. The proposed future development vision is a balance that weighs policies which support higher density development near transit stations areas, and policies which highlight the importance of retaining existing neighborhood character. New development at a higher density is supported along Plymouth Avenue between Penn Avenue and the transit station, with the exception of the few blocks nearest the station. The character of the development on these blocks is proposed to be retained because it reflects the proximity to the regional park, and in some cases reflects an important historic legacy. In Golden Valley, no land use revisions are recommended within the station area. Land Use This plan supports the development vision by offering formal land use guidance for the Plymouth Avenue/ Wirth Park Station Area by proposing changes to the Future Land Use map in The Minneapolis Plan for Sustainable Growth (the comprehensive plan for the entire City of Minneapolis), providing a more detailed Future Land Use map as part of this small area plan— which has policy effect upon adoption. Figure 2.11 depicts the Future Land Use map adopted in The Minneapolis Plan for Sustainable Growth. Important land use policy goals are represented by features on the Future Land Use map in the City of Minneapolis’s comprehensive plan. To provide policy support for the development envisioned for the area, two changes are proposed to the features in this map as depicted in Figure 2.12 and Figure 2.13. 1. The station location at Plymouth Avenue is designated a Transit Station. A Transit Station designation on the Land Use Map establishes policy support for high-density development at transit stations in most cases. This is done to encourage transit use. However, this does not mean that high-density residential is appropriate on every parcel near a transit station. The comprehensive plan states that potential densities and/or redevelopment opportunities are generally highest within ¼ mile of the transit station, but are also dependent upon factors such as existing neighborhood character, and the availability and cost of land. 2. The Community Corridor designation of Plymouth Avenue is extended from Sheridan Avenue North, to the transit station. A Community Corridor designation on the Future Land Use Map indicates a corridor that carries moderate traffic volumes, and makes important connections to other locations. “The development of low- to medium-density housing” is generally supported along the corridor “to serve as a transition to surrounding low-density residential areas.” However, this does not mean that every parcel on a Community Corridor has to be medium-density and existing low-density residential is allowed. The Plymouth Avenue/Wirth Park Station is adjacent to the potential Homewood Historic District and has a strong single-family character. City of Minneapolis and City of Golden Valley, Hennepin County 2-17 It is a destination for Wirth Park and a way to provide transit service to the residents of the north side more than a potential development area. For these reasons, the land use plan directs the new housing and commercial activity to the east end of the station area at the Penn-Plymouth Neighborhood Commercial Node and blocks adjacent to that node on Plymouth and Penn Avenues, rather than adjacent to the station. The addition of the Transit Station and Community Corridor land use features are important additions to help prioritize infrastructure decisions and to support strong pedestrian, bike, and transit connections rather than to encourage the redevelopment of the entire area to medium and high-density housing. The policy excerpts on the following page provide more detail about the policies that are supported at designated Transit Stations and Community Corridors. Figure 2.14 is consistent with the Future Land Use map in the City’s comprehensive plan, but it provides additional detail to it. Along the Plymouth Avenue corridor, for example, it puts residential development in one of two density categories—low density or medium density. Although the colors on the future land use map seem to imply great precision, that is not their intent. For example, a medium density residential development that incorporates a “low-density” property or two may be deemed consistent with the policy intent of this plan without plan amendment. Policy 1.9: Through attention to the mix and intensity of land uses and transit service, the City will support development along Community Corridors that enhances residential livability and pedestrian access. 1.9.1 Support the continued presence of existing small-scale retail sales and commercial services along Community Corridors. 1.9.2 Support new small-scale retail sales and services, commercial services, and mixed uses where Community Corridors intersect with Neighborhood Commercial Nodes. 1.9.3 Discourage uses that diminish the transit and pedestrian oriented character of Community Corridors, such as automobile services and drive- through facilities. 1.9.4 Discourage the conversion of existing residential uses to commercial uses outside of Neighborhood Commercial Nodes. 1.9.5 Encourage the development of low- to medium-density housing on Community Corridors to serve as a transition to surrounding low-density residential areas. 1.9.6 Promote more intensive residential development along Community Corridors near intersections with Neighborhood Commercial Nodes and other locations where it is compatible with existing character. Policy 1.13: Support high density development near transit stations in ways that encourage transit use and contribute to interesting and vibrant places. 1.13.1 Encourage pedestrian-oriented services and retail uses as part of higher density development near transit stations. 1.13.2 Pursue opportunities to integrate existing and new development with transit stations through joint development. 1.13.3 Discourage uses that diminish the transit and pedestrian character of areas around transit stations, such as automobile services, surface parking lots, and drive-through facilities. 1.13.4 Encourage architectural design, building massing and site plans to create or improve public and semi-public spaces near the station. 1.13.5 Concentrate highest densities and mixed use development adjacent to the transit station and along connecting corridors served by bus. 1.13.6 Encourage investment and place making around transit stations through infrastructure changes and the planning and installation of streetscape, public art, and other public amenities. Policy Excerpts from The Minneapolis Plan for Sustainable Growth 2-18 METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Plymouth Avenue / Wirth Park Station Area Planning Figure 2.11: Existing Comprehensive Plan Future Land Use [ This map depicts the Future Land Use map in the adopted Minneapolis Plan for Sustainable Growth. Due to ongoing discussions regarding design, development, and treatment of Olson Memorial Highway, additional guidance for this area will be added to Minneapolis’ plan at a later date before adoption City of Minneapolis and City of Golden Valley, Hennepin County 2-19 Figure 2.12: Future Land Use Modifications [ This map highlights proposed modifications to the City of Minneapolis’ future land use. Due to ongoing discussions regarding design, development, and treatment of Olson Memorial Highway, additional guidance for this area will be added to Minneapolis’ plan at a later date before adoption 2-20 METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Plymouth Avenue / Wirth Park Station Area Planning Figure 2.13: Future Land Use This map depicts proposed modifications to the City of Minneapolis’ future land use in context with the City’s adopted future land use map. Note: The City of Minneapolis defines a Community Corridor as primarily residential with intermittent commercial uses clustered at intersection nodes. [ Due to ongoing discussions regarding design, development, and treatment of Olson Memorial Highway, additional guidance for this area will be added to Minneapolis’ plan at a later date before adoption City of Minneapolis and City of Golden Valley, Hennepin County 2-21 Figure 2.14: Future Land Use (Parcel Basis) This map depicts recommended City of Minneapolis future land use on a parcel- specific basis. [ Due to ongoing discussions regarding design, development, and treatment of Olson Memorial Highway, additional guidance for this area will be added to Minneapolis’ plan at a later date before adoption 2-22 METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Plymouth Avenue / Wirth Park Station Area Planning Figure 2.15 contributes additional clarity concerning the desired density of future development. The map is parcel-specific, similar to the plan’s Future Land Use map (although as described above, that should not be taken to imply complete policy precision). Darker shades of blue indicate policy support for medium or higher density development. Light blue indicates policy support for lower density development. The map assigns property in the Plymouth Avenue/ Wirth Park Station area—whether residential or mixed use—to one of two development districts. The two development districts represent different acceptable density levels. The Urban Scale development district suggests a four-story upper limit on development and the Neighborhood Scale development district supports low to medium density development types that are more compatible with the character of the surrounding residential neighborhoods. Density is frequently measured using parameters like floor area ratio, or dwelling units per square foot of property area. Those density measures are not very intuitive, in part because they don’t lend themselves to being depicted visually. The density scale employed in this plan attempts to make the proposed density levels more intuitive by correlating each district with a mix of compatible development types that are common in Minneapolis and will be easily recognized by most Minneapolis citizens. Where commercial development occurs, it should be of a similar scale to the listed residential building types, or it may be situated on the ground level of an otherwise residential development. Public Realm Improvements Public realm improvements are critical components of the station area as they create a safe and comfortable environment that support walking and biking to the station. These improvements also provide economic, environmental and social benefits that are supportive of overall neighborhood livability. Figure 2.16 shows recommended public realm improvements; Figure 2.17 shows representative public realm improvement images. Streetscaping Enhancing the streetscape environment in the Plymouth Avenue/Wirth Park Station area will facilitate improved mobility to and from the station platform from nearby amenities, destinations, homes and businesses, and improve the character of the public realm. Streetscape enhancements may include improvements to pedestrian facilities, greening the streets, street and pedestrian lighting, street furnishings, signage and wayfinding elements. Specific streetscape improvements recommended near the Plymouth Avenue/Wirth Park Station area include the following: Plymouth Avenue Plymouth Avenue should be designed to include streetscape enhancements that create a pedestrian- friendly corridor. Figure 2.18 depicts the desired character and streetscape features for Plymouth Avenue. Recommended improvements include: • Upgrade any worn sidewalks • Boulevard street trees where they don’t currently exist • Pedestrian lighting • Site furnishings (benches, trash receptacles, bicycle racks) at key intersections • Signage and wayfinding • Relocating overhead utilities underground Xerxes Avenue Xerxes is an important connector to the Plymouth Avenue/Wirth Park Station for residents located to the north of the station. The Xerxes Avenue streetscape currently lacks a sidewalk along the west side of the street and several large street trees were lost due to severe weather conditions. Streetscape improvements to Xerxes should include the following: • Minimum 5-foot wide sidewalk detached from the curb on the west side of the street • Minimum 5-foot wide turf boulevard on the west side of the street • Boulevard street trees where they don’t currently exist • Pedestrian lighting • Site furnishings (benches, trash receptacles, bicycle racks) at the intersection of Xerxes Avenue and Plymouth Avenue • Signage and wayfinding Wayfinding Wayfinding and signage is an important urban design element that orients and directs people to and from their destinations, and enhances the sense of character and identity of a place, neighborhood or community. City of Minneapolis and City of Golden Valley, Hennepin County 2-23 Figure 2.15: Development Intensity This map provide guidance concerning desired density of future City of Minneapolis development. [ Due to ongoing discussions regarding design, development, and treatment of Olson Memorial Highway, additional guidance for this area will be added to Minneapolis’ plan at a later date before adoption 2-24 METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Plymouth Avenue / Wirth Park Station Area Planning Figure 2.16: Public Realm Improvements M i n n e a p o l i s C i t y L i m i t s Xe r x e s A v e N This map depicts public realm improvements that provide economic, environmental and social benefits that are supportive of station area livability. Due to ongoing discussions regarding design, development, and treatment of Olson Memorial Highway, additional guidance for this area will be added to Minneapolis’ plan at a later date before adoption City of Minneapolis and City of Golden Valley, Hennepin County 2-25 Figure 2.17: Representative Public Realm and Streetscape Improvements 2-26 METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Plymouth Avenue / Wirth Park Station Area Planning Figure 2.18: Plymouth Avenue Street Section City of Minneapolis and City of Golden Valley, Hennepin County 2-27 Wayfinding is also an important element to delivering transit users to the station in a safe and convenient manner. Improved wayfinding can enhance mobility to and from the Plymouth Avenue/Wirth Park Station and increase transit ridership in the area. Since the Plymouth Avenue/Wirth Park Station platform will be located adjacent the depressed railroad corridor near the Plymouth Avenue bridge, an attractive and comprehensive signage and wayfinding system should be incorporated into streetscape improvements. These should be located along Plymouth Avenue, particularly at the bridge, along Theodore Wirth Parkway at key intersections, and within parks and open spaces. Vertical Circulation The station platform will be located adjacent the bridge where Plymouth Avenue crosses the rail line, requiring vertical circulation (i.e., elevator and stairs) at the station platform to move transit users safely and conveniently between Plymouth Avenue and the station platform. The ground plane transition down from Plymouth Avenue to the LRT platform should be designed in a manner that reinforces community character and creates a welcoming community open space that incorporates site furnishings, lighting, wayfinding, public art, short and long-term bicycle parking options, and a Nice Ride station. Public Art Opportunities Public art is an important placemaking element in the public realm. It can communicate the history or character of a place, and draw connections to the larger community context. The integration of public art should be considered within the landscaped area between Plymouth Avenue and the station platform and be sensitive to the residential neighborhood and the park setting. Open Space and Parks Trail lighting, wayfinding and signage improvements from the station platform to the Theodore Wirth Regional Park chalet and proposed future Welcome Center will enhance mobility to and from the station and significant park destinations near the station platform. Heritage Preservation Approximately half the station area falls within Theodore Wirth Regional Park and the Grand Rounds. The design of the LRT platform and track should minimize impacts to these valuable community resources. The community has a rich history that is manifested in several select buildings, but also in the general neighborhood character, which includes the housing styles, street and block configurations, and existing or remnant commercial nodes. This is particularly true for the potential Homewood Historic District. While a small amount of new development is proposed near the Plymouth Avenue and Penn Avenue commercial node, community’s rich character should be preserved and to make wise use of resources embedded in the existing housing stock. Even though many of the community’s historic resources are not officially designated, any proposed development in close proximity to them should be done in a manner that either avoids or sensitively incorporates these existing historic resources. Environment and Stormwater Management Many aspects of the station area plan are consistent with the City of Minneapolis’ sustainable development goals, such as implementing the LRT system, improving nonmotorized access to the LRT stations, installing new street trees, and incorporating transit-oriented development. Should any brownfield sites exist within the station area, the City should work with the property owners to facilitate environmental cleanup and site redevelopment. Any building demolition associated with redevelopment should be done in a manner that allows for salvaging and recycling of building materials to the extent possible. Theodore Wirth Regional Park comprised approximately half the station area. The design of the LRT platform and track should be done in a manner to minimize impacts to the rich environmental resources found in the park. Installation of vegetative plantings should be considered to buffer adjacent parkland and residential areas from the LRT line. The situation differs at station platforms, where maintenance of clear sight lines is desired between adjacent land uses and the platform to enhance pedestrian safety. New development should manage stormwater on site, using stormwater management techniques such as low impact development and green infrastructure. These stormwater management practices attempt to mimic natural hydrologic processes to promote stormwater infiltration and reduce the quantity of runoff entering the storm sewer system, while also meeting water quality, rate control, and volume control requirements. 2-28 METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Plymouth Avenue / Wirth Park Station Area Planning Maintenance of Public Realm Improvements Minneapolis Many of the streetscape elements shown in the document will require further discussions between the City of Minneapolis, Hennepin, County, and adjacent property owners to identify operations and maintenance funding. Special Service Districts have been successfully implemented throughout the city in commercial areas, however current state statutes prevent special service districts in residential areas. Current policy states that street lighting on pedestrian priority corridors will be funded as part of reconstruction project budget. Banners, street benches, colored pavement, pavers, plantings, and trash receptacles may be funded through special service districts or by encroachment permit. Adjacent property owners in residential areas or in commercial areas without special service districts may work with the city to secure encroachment permits or may enter into agreements with the city to operate and maintain a streetscape element. Stormwater elements will also require discussions with the city so that property maintenance is performed. Low impact development and green infrastructure often requires higher maintenance commitments, which requires additional resources and acceptance from the maintaining agency. Golden Valley Many of the streetscape elements shown in the document will require further discussions between the City of Golden Valley, Hennepin, County, and adjacent property owners to identify operations and maintenance funding. Stormwater elements will also require discussions with the city so that property maintenance is performed. Low impact development and green infrastructure often requires higher maintenance commitments, which requires additional resources and acceptance from the maintaining agency Community Health Benefits The Plymouth Avenue Station Area Plan recommends filling in sidewalk and trail gaps to increase access for people walking and biking to the station. Some limited small-scale commercial development as mentioned in the plans at the intersection of Penn and Plymouth Avenues which could result in walkable destinations for residents, including vulnerable populations who are less likely to be able to drive cars. Additionally, the METRO Blue Line Extension and Plymouth Avenue Station have the potential to positively impact health all along the line by providing convenient access to Theodore Wirth Regional Park. Increased access to outdoor space and extensive programming that takes place in this large park provides opportunities for transit-dependent populations to be physically active. Table 2.2 summarizes healthy community design features that are incorporated into the station area plan. City of Minneapolis and City of Golden Valley, Hennepin County 2-29 Table 2.2: Healthy Community Design Features Healthy Community Design Feature How Station Area Planning Is Addressing Healthy Community Design Socially equitable and accessible community • The METRO Blue Line Extension will bring light rail transit (LRT) to underserved communities. • Transit helps improve overall health in communities by improving physical activity levels, job access, housing and transportation costs, traffic safety, education access and access to healthy food. Housing for different incomes and different stages of life • Development concepts show a variety of new housing types that could be either ownership or rental opportunities and show the preservation of a majority of existing housing. Easy connections to the METRO Blue Line Extension and the regional transit system • Gaps in sidewalk network are recommended to be filled in. • New bicycle facilities are recommended. • Metro Transit will be investigating potential bus service improvements. Mixed land uses where homes, shops, schools and work sites are located close together • Station area plans show a variety of land uses as appropriate to the station area contexts. Jobs and education are accessible from/within the community • The Van White Boulevard station area and Plymouth Avenue/Penn Avenue commercial node show new job/education land uses. • Station area plans maintain existing sources of jobs. • The METRO Blue Line Extension will improve access to jobs and education destinations. Walking and biking are safe and comfortable • Safe crossings of Olson Memorial Highway are recommended. • Various options are recommended to safely reach the grade-separated Plymouth Avenue and Golden Valley Road stations. • Sidewalks are recommended to be buffered from the street by a planted boulevard. • New bicycle facilities are recommended. • Enhanced lighting is recommended. • Improved wayfinding signage is recommended to help direct people to the stations. Public places for social interaction • Development concepts provide community gathering spaces near the stations. Parks and green spaces are easy to get to • New sidewalk and bicycle connections to parks are recommended. Outlets for fresh, healthy food • The mixed-use commercial nodes at the Van White Boulevard Station and at the intersection of Plymouth Avenue and Penn Avenue could accommodate small grocery service or a small farmers market. • Existing community gardens are maintained. 2-30 METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Plymouth Avenue / Wirth Park Station Area Planning Implementation Framework Adoption and Modification of Policy Guidance City of Golden Valley Implementing the development vision for the Plymouth Avenue/Wirth Park Station area will not require modifications to City of Golden Valley policy and regulatory documents. Yet, it is recommended that this plan be adopted by the City of Golden Valley as official City guidance for the Plymouth Avenue/Wirth Park Station area. City of Minneapolis Implementing the development vision for the Plymouth Avenue/Wirth Park Station area requires modifications to City of Minneapolis policy and regulatory documents. • METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Station Area Planning. This plan should be adopted by the City of Minneapolis as official City guidance for the four station areas. The plan should be referenced in the City’s comprehensive plan in the list of adopted plans, and its area of impact denoted in the map that illustrates adopted plans. • The Minneapolis Plan for Sustainable Growth. A modification to the City of Minneapolis comprehensive plan, and specifically to its Future Land Use map, should be adopted, so as to make it consistent with the land use policy guidance in this plan. Two modifications to land use features are required. A Transit Station feature should be added to the map at the Plymouth Avenue/Wirth Park Station and the Community Corridor on Plymouth Avenue should be extended westward to the City Limits. • Rezoning of Property. A rezoning study should follow adoption of this plan. Its purpose would be to propose changes in zoning that are consistent with the policy intent of this plan, as described in the narrative, and as illustrated in this plan’s Future Land Use and Development Intensity maps. • Minneapolis Health Department Participation. Because the Health Impact Assessment (HIA) completed in 2013 found that the LRT was likely to have a positive influence on health, and that the potential land use changes and investments that come with the LRT project present a valuable opportunity to address challenges in the corridor, it is recommended that the Minneapolis Health Department participate and provide input on implementation of these station area plans to ensure the integration of the HIA’s findings. These include physical activity, housing + transportation costs, employment, education access, traffic safety, and healthy food access – all public health policy elements that would emphasize and promote health and health equity in the communities of North Minneapolis. Development Vision Implementation Infill housing. There is concern about the vacant properties that linger in the neighborhood. Attracting new single family housing to these properties is important for stabilizing the blocks they are on, and stemming further disinvestment. Given the stability of the neighborhood, and the large share of the housing that is owner occupied, the housing market may be strong enough in some instances to attract infill development without public intervention. In other instances the lot may be an appropriate target for an existing public subsidy program such as Green Homes North. The development of new transit service at Plymouth Avenue should bolster neighborhood values further, and attract additional development interest. Physical Environment Improvements Physical environment improvements have been broken into two phases. • Day of Opening Improvements. These are improvements recommended to be constructed and functional on the first day that the LRT is operating. Day of opening improvements support safe and convenient access to the station platform for station area residents and visitors. • Future Improvements. These are desired station area improvements that support enhanced livability within the station area and enhanced access, but do not significantly impact access to the station platform. City of Minneapolis and City of Golden Valley, Hennepin County 2-31 Day of Opening Improvements Recommended day of opening improvements are listed in Table 2.3 and depicted on Figure 2.19 - Figure 2.21. Agencies responsible for implementation of these improvements and the timing of implementation will be discussed and resolved as part of the preliminary engineering phase of the project. Future Improvements Table 2.4 suggests potential partners who may individually or jointly take on the responsibility for implementation of the future improvement. The list of potential partners does not imply a commitment by the listed agencies to implement the future improvements. Implementation of the recommended policy, development and physical environment improvements, while not comprehensive, will support transit ridership through the provision of safe and convenient access to the transit stations. These improvements will also provide economic, social, and environmental benefits to the station area and broader community. Improvements Comments A Roadway and wayfinding signage Legible to people who speak multiple languages and located directly adjacent to platform B Wayfinding signage at key decision points Legible to people who speak multiple languages. Key decision points include: a. Plymouth Avenue and Theodore Wirth Parkway intersection b. Plymouth Avenue and Penn Avenue intersection c. Golden Valley Road and Xerxes Avenue intersection C Vertical circulation between platform and street level Assumes enclosed structure that includes elevator, stairs, good user visibility, and ADA compliant access Provide safe and comfortable access, including ADA compliant pathways for pedestrians and bicyclists, seating, lighting, and incorporation of short- and long-term bicycle parking D Public Art Located at Xerxes and Plymouth E Bicycle parking near platform See above F Nice Ride station near platform See above G Bus drop-off area May require curb line modifications H Passenger drop-off area May require parking restrictions I Fill in sidewalk gap on south side of Plymouth between the Plymouth Avenue bridge and Washburn Avenue J Sidewalk connection to Wirth Chalet and Welcome Center K Pedestrian-scaled street lighting along Plymouth Avenue Wirth Chalet to Penn Avenue. L Additional lighting for safety around the station platform/under the bridge Note: not depicted on Figure 2.19 - Figure 2.21. M Bus route modifications and bus stop improvements Note: not depicted on Figure 2.19 - Figure 2.21. Table 2.3: Day of Opening Improvements 2-32 METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Plymouth Avenue / Wirth Park Station Area Planning Figure 2.19: Day of Opening Pedestrian Circulation Improvements J I GH X Day of Opening Improvements (see Table 2.1) This map identifies pedestrian circulation improvements that are recommended to be in place by the first day of LRT operations. Map elements not coded with a letter are intended to be future improvements. Olson Memorial Hwy Due to ongoing discussions regarding design, development, and treatment of Olson Memorial Highway, additional guidance for this area will be added to Minneapolis’ plan at a later date before adoption City of Minneapolis and City of Golden Valley, Hennepin County 2-33 Figure 2.20: Day of Opening Bicycle Circulation Improvements F X Day of Opening Improvements (see Table 2.1) This map identifies bicycle circulation improvements that are recommended to be in place by the first day of LRT operations. Map elements not coded with a letter are intended to be future improvements. E Olson Memorial Hwy Due to ongoing discussions regarding design, development, and treatment of Olson Memorial Highway, additional guidance for this area will be added to Minneapolis’ plan at a later date before adoption 2-34 METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Plymouth Avenue / Wirth Park Station Area Planning Figure 2.21: Day of Opening Public Realm Improvements B B BK A DC M i n n e a p o l i s C i t y L i m i t s This map identifies public realm improvements that are recommended to be in place by the first day of LRT operations. Map elements not coded with a letter are intended to be future improvements. X Day of Opening Improvements (see Table 2.1) Xe r x e s A v e N Due to ongoing discussions regarding design, development, and treatment of Olson Memorial Highway, additional guidance for this area will be added to Minneapolis’ plan at a later date before adoption City of Minneapolis and City of Golden Valley, Hennepin County 2-35 Improvements Potential Partners Comments Streetscape enhancements along Plymouth Avenue • City of Minneapolis • Xcel Energy • Upgrade worn sidewalks • street trees (fill in gaps) • Site furnishings at key intersections • Relocate existing overhead utilities underground Streetscape enhancements along Xerxes Avenue • City of Minneapolis • Minimum 5 foot wide sidewalk on west side of street • Minimum 5 foot wide boulevard • Street trees • Pedestrian lighting • Site furnishings at Xerxes and Plymouth Complete remainder of wayfinding system • Hennepin County • City of Minneapolis Less critical, but important locations located along Penn Avenue, Golden Valley Road and Theodore Wirth Parkway Enhance bus turn- around and intersection at Theodore Wirth Parkway and Plymouth Avenue • Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board • Metro Transit Improved pedestrian and bicycle crossings of Plymouth Avenue • City of Minneapolis Fill in remaining sidewalk gaps • City of Minneapolis Complete bicycle network • City of Minneapolis Trail and pedestrian bridge over Bassett Creek • Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board Connection to existing trail network in Theodore Wirth Regional Park Bicycle parking at key neighborhood destinations • City of Minneapolis • Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board • Property Developers Fill in remaining sidewalk gaps • City of Minneapolis • Adjacent Property Developers Complete bicycle network • City of Minneapolis Bicycle parking at key neighborhood destinations • City of Minneapolis • Property Developers • Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board Includes plaza at intersection of Plymouth Avenue and Penn Avenue, and other neighborhood parks and schools as needed. BRT station near the intersection of Penn Avenue and Plymouth Avenue • Metro Transit • City of Minneapolis Table 2.4: Future Improvements GOLDEN VALLEY ROAD STATION AREA 1. Existing Conditions Analysis 2. Station Area Vision 3. Implementation Framework 3 3-2 METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Golden Valley Road Station Area Planning The proposed Golden Valley Road Station is located at the northwest corner of Theodore Wirth Regional Park, at the intersection of Golden Valley Road and the BNSF Railway. The station area extends one-half mile around each proposed light rail transit (LRT) station, or the distance the average person can walk to/from the station in ten minutes. One-half mile is the transit industry standard for the maximum length that people are willing to walk to reach a transitway station. While a one-half mile is equated with a ten-minute walk, in reality this does not always hold true on the ground as factors such as terrain and the transportation network affects how people move through the station area. Please see Figure 3.1 for a map of the station location, half-mile radius, and ten-minute walk extent. Relationship to Community Health Residents in the Golden Valley station area do not currently experience the same level of health disparities as residents at other stations along the line. As Table 3.1 shows, the poverty rate2 is below the Hennepin County average, although it is almost twice the Golden Valley city average. However, the METRO Blue Line Extension and station area planning has the potential to improve health in the station area by increasing access to high quality, high frequency transit for area residents. Walking or biking to transit rather than driving increases the likelihood that people will achieve the recommended amount of daily physical activity. The station area plan recommends improvements to sidewalks and bikeways that could improve safety for people walking and biking to, though, and around the station area. Additionally, this station area provides access to physical activity opportunities including an extensive network of biking and walking trails including the Grand Rounds scenic byway, a bike route that circles Minneapolis. Existing Conditions Analysis Roadways As shown in Figure 3.2, Golden Valley Road (Hennepin County Road 66) is a two-lane undivided minor arterial roadway that acts as an east-west connector between north Minneapolis and Golden Valley. Approximately 8,300 vehicles per day used Golden Valley Road on the west side of the station area in 2012; 5,100 vehicles per day used the roadway on the east side. Golden Valley Road spans the BNSF corridor. The urban street grid becomes less regular in Golden Valley and local streets are spaced further apart creating longer blocks. Theodore Wirth Parkway serves north-south traffic through the park. It connects to Victory Memorial Parkway north of the station, along with Wirth Beach and the Minneapolis chain of lakes south of the station. Approximately 4,250 vehicles per day use the Parkway in the station area. Primary Community Input Several community members expressed concern about increased street parking due to transit riders driving to the station area and parking on neighborhood streets. Community members also expressed concerns with pedestrian and bicycle safety at the intersection of Golden Valley Road and Theodore Wirth Parkway. GOLDEN VALLEY ROAD STATION AREA Half-Mile Station Area Minneapolis Golden Valley Hennepin County Population (2010)2,351 382,578 20,371 1,152,388 Persons under 18 years 23%20.2%19.9%22.4% Persons over 65 years 11%8.0%20.3%12.2% Minority 44%36.2%14.6%23.6% Zero car households 6%19%5.7%10.5% Living in poverty 11%22.5%6.8%12.8% Data sources: U.S. Census (2010); American Community Survey 2007-2011 5-year summary file Table 3.1: Golden Valley Road Community Profile 2Living in poverty is defined as populations living in households whose income is at or below the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services poverty thresholds. As a reference, this threshold was $22,300 in 2010 for a family of four. Minority is defined as non- white. City of Minneapolis and City of Golden Valley, Hennepin County 3-3 Figure 3.1: Golden Valley Road Station Area Golden Valley Rd Yo r k A v e N Xe r x e s A v e N Theodo r e W i r t h P k w y This map shows the half mile buffer and 10 minute walking extent for the station area. 3-4 METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Golden Valley Road Station Area Planning Figure 3.2: Existing Streets and Highways Golden Valley Rd Yo r k A v e N Xe r x e s A v e N Theodo r e W i r t h P k w y This map depicts existing and forecasted traffic volumes and roadway jurisdictions. City of Minneapolis and City of Golden Valley, Hennepin County 3-5 Figure 3.3: Existing Transit Routes Golden Valley Rd Yo r k A v e N Xe r x e s A v e N Theodo r e W i r t h P k w y 30 This map depicts existing bus routes. 3-6 METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Golden Valley Road Station Area Planning Figure 3.4: Golden Valley Road - Theodore Wirth Parkway Intersection Legend: “Free right” turns T H E O D O R E W I R T H P A R K W A Y GOLDEN VALLEY ROAD GLENWO O D P A R K W A Y T H E O D O R E W I R T H T R A I L Transit As shown in Figure 3.3, local Routes 14 and 30 operate on Golden Valley Road in the station area. Route 30 terminates at Xerxes Avenue before it reaches the station location; Route 14 currently serves the proposed station location. Transit connections are important in this area as Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute clients, residents and employees could utilize transit to access this destination. Primary Community Input Route 14 and Route 30 bus service along Golden Valley Road is not high-frequency, and the Route 30 does not extend to the station location. This could make transfers to or from LRT difficult. Bikeways and Sidewalks As shown in Figure 3.5, the Theodore Wirth segment of the Grand Rounds Scenic Byway, which passes through the station area, includes a trail that connects north to Victory Memorial Parkway and south to Cedar Lake. The Parkway and trail intersection with Golden Valley Road presents a safety issue for all users and has been the site of seven bicycle and pedestrian crashes since 2009. The intersection is segmented to allow drivers to make “free right” turns—drivers do not need to come to a full stop to make a right turn, they only need to yield. This configuration also requires that Theodore Wirth Trail users make three roadway crossings to cross from the north to south side of Golden Valley Road. Please see Figure 3.4 for a picture of this intersection. Immediately north of Golden Valley Road, in Mary Hills Nature Area, a non-paved trail winds northward and connects with Rice Lake Nature Area in Golden Valley and Sochacki Park in Robbinsdale. Currently, the only connection between this trail and the Theodore Wirth Regional Park trail system is an informal foot path on the existing freight rail line that passes under Golden Valley Road. Many neighborhood residents also use informal paths across the existing freight rail tracks to access Mary Hills Nature Area. While done, these are not legal crossings of the railroad. These paths will no longer be accessible when LRT is constructed. See Figure 3.5 for a map of informal routes used today and distances to existing grade-separated crossings. The City of Golden Valley and Three Rivers Park District plan to construct the Bassett Creek Regional Trail on the south side of Golden Valley Road, which will link to the Theodore Wirth Regional Park trail at the intersection of Golden Valley Road and Theodore Wirth Parkway and then transition to an on-street bicycle lane in Minneapolis. Street lights along Golden Valley Road and Theodore Wirth Parkway are geared toward the roadway and not the sidewalks; there is no pedestrian-scale lighting in the station area. The sidewalk network is fairly consistent on the east side of the station area in Minneapolis, but does not exist in Golden Valley. The exception is sidewalks along Golden Valley Road that are in poor condition and located at the back of the curb, with pedestrians walking immediately adjacent to roadway traffic. Construction of Bassett Creek Regional Trail will include improvements to the sidewalks on the north side of Golden Valley Road in the station area. St. Margaret Mary Church occupies a large parcel on the north side of Golden Valley Road. The configuration of the parcel and the lack of connections across it makes pedestrian movement to the proposed station inconvenient from points north. Primary Community Input Community members who participated in engagement activities expressed a desire for several improvements to the sidewalk and trail network in the area: • A grade-separated trail connection between Mary Hills Nature Center and Theodore Wirth Regional Park; • Improved and well-lit pedestrian connections between the station and the residential neighborhoods north of St. Margaret Mary Church and Glenview Terrace Park; City of Minneapolis and City of Golden Valley, Hennepin County 3-7 Figure 3.5: Existing / Planned Sidewalks and Bikeways Golden Valley Rd Yo r k A v e N Xe r x e s A v e N Theodo r e W i r t h P k w y This map shows existing sidewalks and bikeways, along with identified sidewalk gaps, planned sidewalks and planned bikeways previously identified in city policy documents. 3-8 METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Golden Valley Road Station Area Planning Figure 3.6: Existing Land Use Golden Valley Rd Yo r k A v e N Xe r x e s A v e N Theodo r e W i r t h P k w y source: Metropolitan Council, 2010 This map shows existing land uses with data received from the Metropolitan Council (2010). City of Minneapolis and City of Golden Valley, Hennepin County 3-9 • A pedestrian and bicycle connection between the station and Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute; • Pedestrian-scale lighting along Golden Valley Road and Theodore Wirth Parkway; • Changes to the configuration of the Golden Valley Road and Theodore Wirth Parkway intersection to improve bicycle and pedestrian safety and experience on the Grand Rounds; and • Safe and well-lit access to the grade-separated platform. Land Use Land uses in the Golden Valley Road station area are depicted in Figure 3.6. The land use map was created from data received from the Metropolitan Council (2010). The land uses shown on this map represent a period in time and may not exactly match actual land uses or the Cities’ existing land use maps. Please note that while it provides project context, it is not the official land use map for the cities of Minneapolis or Golden Valley. The Golden Valley Road station area encompasses large areas of park and open space to the north and south. Developed areas exist to the east and west, as well as to the north beyond intervening woods and parkland. Essentially all of the housing development to the west of the station is in the form of single family homes. Lot sizes are relatively large; most are between 10,000 and 25,000 square feet. The homes were largely built in the 1950s. Several are rented, but most are owner occupied. Terrain is hilly, which could present challenges for redevelopment. Homes to the east of the proposed station are on more modest lots, from 5,000 to 15,000 square feet in size. Those that were built in the 1940s and 1950s are more common than those built in the 1920s. Many homes are rented, but the majority of them are owner occupied. There are apartment buildings on Golden Valley Road east of Xerxes Avenue that have been nominated as a historic district. This historic district nomination is currently under review by the City of Minneapolis. The single-family residential blocks to the north and south of Golden Valley Road in Minneapolis have some vacant lots, which provide an opportunity for lower density infill development. The topography is hilly in parts. There are several prominent institutional and health care developments along Golden Valley Road in the station area. The Church of St Margaret Mary is on a large property on the north corner of Golden Valley Road and Theodore Wirth Parkway intersection. It provides space for a school and other programs, in addition to church facilities. Unity Christ Church fronts on Golden Valley Road a little under half a mile to the west of St Margaret Mary. Two large care facilities are established on the south side of Golden Valley Road— Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute, and the Minneapolis Clinic of Neurology. These large properties may be able to support expansion of the facilities, or other intensification of development. The City of Golden Valley has a fire station that fronts on Golden Valley Road, a thousand feet from the future transit station. The City is currently evaluating the need and locations of fire stations, the result of which may open up this 1.7 acre site for other development. Community Character The Golden Valley Road Station will serve the Willard Hay neighborhood in Minneapolis, neighborhoods and institutions in Golden Valley, Theodore Wirth Regional Park users, and nearby destinations and amenities, as depicted in Figure 3.7. The primary feature of the station area is the abundance of adjacent parkland, including Theodore Wirth Regional Park and Parkway, Mary Hills and Rice Lake Nature Areas, Glenview Terrace Park and Valley View Park. The community values the parkland and states that it is a critical component of the station area character. The station area is a single-family suburban neighborhood with low potential for change given the many parks and the stable neighborhoods surrounding the station. Major healthcare providers located to the west along Golden Valley Road may benefit greatly from the new LRT station. The station will be an origin for transit riders who arrive on foot, bus, and bicycle, or who are dropped off by car, as well as a destination for nearby healthcare providers and park users. Primary Community Input Community members who participated in engagement activities are satisfied with the current character of the neighborhood and are generally not seeking new residential, retail, or other development, or displacement of the stable housing in the neighborhood. Some community members also expressed concern regarding potential noise and vibration resulting from LRT operations. To this end, neighborhood residents want the station to fit in with the existing neighborhood character and park setting. 3-10 METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Golden Valley Road Station Area Planning Figure 3.7: Existing / Planned Amenities and Destinations Golden Valley Rd Yo r k A v e N Xe r x e s A v e N Theodo r e W i r t h P k w y This map identifies amenities and destinations located in the station area. City of Minneapolis and City of Golden Valley, Hennepin County 3-11 Community members who participated in engagement activities pointed out that the area near the station is on the edge of the park, gets very dark, and can feel unsafe, especially at night. Lighting and security cameras are necessary, as well as wayfinding. Finally, residents embrace the park as a major asset in their neighborhood, and were concerned about the impact of LRT on the natural environment. Therefore, residents desire a low-impact station design that respects the parkland. 3-12 METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Golden Valley Road Station Area Planning Station Area Vision Future Station Area Character The Golden Valley Road Station area is envisioned as: • A quiet residential neighborhood adjacent to natural areas and parklands; • A place that provides sensitively designed recreation connections to regional trails, parkland, and natural resources; and • A connection for LRT riders to regional employment, recreational, educational, and health care opportunities. This vision statement can be used as a guide for city staff and community members as they evaluate future development proposals to ensure that new development is consistent with and supportive of the desired community character for this station area. Circulation Roadways In order to facilitate vehicular drop offs of transit riders for neighborhood residents, modifications of the street curb lines may be necessary to create special bays on each side of the street for passenger drop-off on Golden Valley Road. This space is intended for very short term use as LRT passengers exit or enter vehicles. Reconfiguring the intersection of Golden Valley Road and Theodore Wirth Parkway is envisioned to remove the free right turns, slow vehicular traffic, and make vehicular, pedestrian, and bicycle movements more predictable. Pedestrian-scale lighting and Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) - compliant pedestrian ramps are envisioned as part of the intersection improvements. An analysis of traffic movement may be needed to determine if a traffic signal will be necessary as part of the intersection reconfiguration. See Figure 3.8 for proposed roadway enhancements. Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities In addition to an elevator and stairs that will be incorporated into the station platform, a safe, well-lit, comfortable and convenient ground plane transition from street level down to the LRT platform will be an important factor in the success of the Golden Valley Road station. The area where the ground plane changes elevations should accommodate ADA compliant movement for both pedestrians and bicyclists. The following improvements should be considered at locations where pedestrians and bicyclists are expected to cross higher volume roadways, such as Golden Valley Road. All Intersections • Median island pedestrian refuges or curb extensions • Improved intersection and pedestrian realm lighting • Crossing signage • ADA-compliant pedestrian ramps Signalized Intersections • High visibility crosswalk markings and signs • Traffic signal timing modifications to provide adequate crossing time for pedestrians • Countdown timers that allow pedestrians to make informed decisions whether there is adequate time to safely cross the roadway. • ADA-compliant signals Non-signalized Intersections • Rapid flashing beacons There are several critical gaps in the sidewalk network in the station area. The sidewalk on the north side of Golden Valley Road should be reconstructed and new sidewalks constructed along Bassett Creek Drive and Legend Drive in Golden Valley. Sidewalk gap closures are also proposed along the west side of Xerxes Avenue between Plymouth Avenue and 26th Avenue North, along 26th Avenue North, and along Parkview Boulevard. For a map of envisioned pedestrian and bicycle circulation enhancements, see Figure 3.9 and Figure 3.10. Three Rivers Park District and the City of Golden Valley plan to construct the Bassett Creek Regional Trail along the south side of Golden Valley Road, which will facilitate walking and biking connections to the LRT station from areas west. The cities of Golden Valley and Robbinsdale are also collaborating with Three Rivers Park District to pave an existing trail through Sochacki Park, Mary Hills Nature Area, and Rice Lake Nature Area that will facilitate walking and biking connections from the north. The station area plan envisions the extension of this trail from its current trailhead at the north end of Bonnie Lane south to Golden Valley Road and making a grade City of Minneapolis and City of Golden Valley, Hennepin County 3-13 Figure 3.8: Roadway Circulation Enhancements This map shows recommended roadway enhancements in the station area to better support station area livability and LRT station access. 3-14 METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Golden Valley Road Station Area Planning Figure 3.9: Pedestrian Circulation Enhancements This map shows recommended pedestrian circulation enhancement to better support station area livability and LRT station access. City of Minneapolis and City of Golden Valley, Hennepin County 3-15 Figure 3.10: Bicycle Circulation Enhancements This map shows recommended bicycle circulation enhancement to better support station area livability and LRT station access. 3-16 METRO Blue Line Extension (Bottineau LRT) Phase 1: Golden Valley Road Station Area Planning separated crossing under the Golden Valley Road Bridge into Theodore Wirth Regional Park. Once in Theodore Wirth Regional Park, the extended trail could connect to the existing regional trail network in the park. A spur trail should also be provided between the new trail and the Bassett Creek Regional Trail on the south side of Golden Valley Road. Additional approaches to better support walking and biking to the station from points north, include a proposed multi-use trail along Manor Drive, and another trail across Glenview Terrace Park and along the west side of the Church of St. Margaret Mary property. A second trail is envisioned across Glenview Terrace Park that would make a connection to Kewanee Way. All proposed trails located east of the freight rail and LRT could be designed as a grade separated crossing under Golden Valley Road enabling a direct connection to the LRT platform. Any scenarios for new multi-use trails across these properties would need to have the full support and participation of the property owner. Finally, in Minneapolis, new on-street bicycle lanes are proposed on Thomas Avenue and on Golden Valley Road, which would better facilitate bicycle connections to the station. A Nice Ride Station is proposed near the LRT platform, as well. Transit Route 14 will continue to serve the station and a short extension of Route 30 is envisioned allowing the route to terminate at the LRT station. Stops may be shifted slightly to facilitate a more direct transfer from LRT to bus. Prior to LRT service starting operations, Metro Transit will evaluate the bus routes and bus stop locations and make modifications as necessary to best support convenient transfers between bus and LRT service. The concurrent West Broadway Transit Study could result in recommendations for enhanced bus or streetcar connections to either the METRO Blue Line Extension Golden