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DEIC Agenda Packet - april 26 REGULAR MEETING AGENDA Attendance: This meeting will be held in person at Golden Valley City Hall and virtually via WebEx. Some members of the board/commission may attend by telephone or interactive technology. Members of the public may attend this meeting via Webex or by calling 1-415-655-0001 and entering access code 133 659 0690. Questions/Comments: Members of the public who have questions about the commission or any items on the agenda should contact the staff commission liaison – Kiarra Zackery, Equity and Inclusion Manager at (763) 593- 8045. 1. Call to Order 2. Roll Call  Chair, Joelle Allen  Vice Chair, Ajani Woodson  Nyre Chester  Melissa Johnson  Drew Jones  Carol Luo  Chris Mitchell  Ruth Paradise  Teresa Sit  Lee Thorsen 3. Approval of Agenda 4. Approval of March 22, 2022 minutes 5. New Commissioner Introductions and Oath (Kiarra) 6. Updates/Reminders A. Council Chamber Construction and Future Meeting Locations B. Budget and Council Update C. OSRC + Naming Policy D. Virtual Meeting Request Forms 7. Work plan (Joelle) 8. Land Acknowledgement Resolutio April 26, 2022 – 6:30 pm Council Conference Room Golden Valley City Hall 7800 Golden Valley Road City of Golden Valley Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Commission Regular Meeting April 26, 2022 – 6:30 pm 2 9. Community Engagement Updates A. Q2 BAEGV (Chris) B. Allianz (Ajani) 10. Adjourn Quarterly Activites: Jan - Mar Timeframe Cost Work Plan Discussion Jan Land Acknowledgement workshop Jan $500 Annual MLK Day Contest Jan BAEGV Equity Forum: BLACK HISTORY MONTH 17-Feb Sweet Potato Com. Pie MLK Wknd Feb $400 Sponsorship request process Mar Quarterly Activites: Apr - Jun Timeframe Cost Human Rights Day Planning Day of Service Planning Golden Valley Pride - Booth Planning $250 Work plan and Land Acknowledgement to Council May 10th BAEGV Equity Forum: ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE May 19th 400 Welcome packet planning Public Asset Naming Policy w/ OSRC Quarterly Activites: Jul - Sep Timeframe Cost Human Rights Day planning Bill Hobbs Award Promotion 150 Day of Service 11-Sep-22 300 BAEGV Equity Forum: HOUSING 18-Aug-22 $400 Golden Valley Pride Aug-27-2022 Welcome packet distributed in third quarter Aug-27-2022 1250 Quarterly Activites: Oct - Dec Timeframe Cost Sweet Potato Comfort Pie Planning 400 Human Rights Day - Bill Hobbs Award 10-Dec-22 Human Rights Day Promotion $500 Purchase table for 2021 MLK breakfast Nov 17th BAEGV Equity Forum (Engage & Celebrate Golden Valley)EOY November 17 400 Final report (city compliance??)12/31/2022 2022 DEIC Annual Report Nov 17th 400 Indigenous Peoples Day Nov 24,2022 2500 7850 Income Left Over 2500 Budget 3500 Indengouus funds 10000 16000 Expenses 7850 Balance 8150 Notes https://healourcommunities.org/day-of-racial- healing/ The 2022 Day of Racial Healing Webinar has a beautiful Land Acknowledgement by Christian Parrish Takes the Gun, aka Supaman/Awe aakeen baa aachile from the Apsaalooke Nation in Montana of the Big Lodge Clan. The land acknowledgement starts at around 7:38 of the video. Hope you have time to watch the entire video. Pay speaker directly. Each speaker @$100 each. SPCP to let us know how many speakers Look at HSC process Notes Would be nice to focus these events on positive relationships, diversity, peace, and common good, in our community and our city. Dec. 10, 2022 May look at something different this year Booth ($100) + $150 DEIC Swag Present work plan and Land Acknowledgement resolution at Council Work Session Partner with environmental commission Partner with OSRC to develop citywide policy. City Council directive Now Collaboration with OSRC (Rick Birno) - Kiarra to arrange premeeting with Joelle & Rick Notes given out December 10th. Deadline is October 31st. Selection made at November meeting Sheri Shoquist (speaker & Housing & Economic Development Manager). Currently in Council Chambers. Can look at different venue Designed by a culturally sensative graphic artist and printed. Notes Even though I've never participated in this event, I really like the partnerships with the community and local school and doing good for others Cost goes to supporting honorarium for the speaker. Planning begins in November. Meetings begin early December This is a great award and the Human Rights Day with the Bill Hobbs Award should continue. Consider doing an ad in the program book in lieu of a table to recognize the Golden Valley Youth Contest Winners and the work that the City of Golden Valley is doing in alingment with Dr. King's mission. As long as there is an MLK breakfast, I am in favor of continuing to purchase a table. If there is not a breakfast, the budget for the event should be spent to recognize Dr. King and the fair andequal justice and opportunity that he stood for. EVERYTHING DONE BY THE FORUM: Annual Report, Recommendations, Audience is for community, city staff and city council. Meeting for November on the 15th to move away from Thanksgiving Data collection in early spring, census, employee data, Met Council, Wilder Foundation, MN Compass, MDE Scorecard for EOY report. City is looking to create equity dashboard with ESRI. Deliverable is to provide what data we want to see. Provided at Forum in Novemer along with feedback mechanisms. Commission a piece of art (from an Indigenous person) for Brookview, the library or City Hall. The $2500 is for the total amount spent for the Land Ackknowledgement Work plan (Article 1) Golden Valley – Who was here before us? Why acknowledge that the City of Golden Valley is located on land that was the land of the Dakota People, indigenous Native Americans? America has been referred to as a “melting pot” of people coming from different countries and “melting” into one culture. Today, we look at things differently, valuing the different cultural and ethnic identities that people bring with them, as we live together as “Americans”. The majority of people living in the United States are descendants of immigrants, or are immigrants themselves. Native Americans were here, with their own civilization and cultures before these immigrants arrived. What is known about the Native American people who lived in our “Golden Valley” before the new immigrants arrived? What happened to them? What is happening to them? Native American identity must be understood not as seen in the movies, in cowboy and Indian wars, but as real people. People who are working now to recapture their own culture within the framework of the American “Dream”. The City of Golden Valley is developing a statement, commonly referred to as a “Land Acknowledgement Statement” to start at the beginning of the history of our city, before any settlers came to live here. Similar “statements” are being made across the country, by cities, states, universities, schools, businesses and not-for-profit organizations. The goal is to learn from our history by acknowledging not only the past, but the present. Looking to learn how we can have cultural differences while being a “melting pot”. This acknowledgment is part of the steps we want to take meet this challenge. Below is the proposed Land Acknowledgement statement to be used by the City of Golden Valley. . Look specifically at the 1st paragraph. ¶1 We acknowledge and honor the Dakota nation, on whose ancestral lands’ the City of Golden Valley is built, and whose land resources we use. ¶2 We reflect on the forced exile and the codified dispossession of the Dakota peoples, due to actions by the government, traders and land speculators, leading to the Land Cession 289 and the 1851 Treaty of Traverse des Sioux. We further recognize the injustices done by actions taken to suppress, over the following many decades, the Dakota People’s knowledge and practice of their cultural and spiritual heritage. ¶3 We further acknowledge, honor and respect their continuing existence as a sovereign nation here in the land they call Mni Sota Makoce. (Article 2) Golden Valley: What happened to the people of the Dakota Nation after new immigrants, mainly from Europe, arrived in Minnesota” It has been hard ,over the past several years, to watch the news. We see people from Ukraine, with only what they can carry, being displaced from their homes. We read of the war in Syria, where six million people have become refugees, again, being forced to leave with only what they could carry. Do you know that when the first settlers arrived from Europe to the “new world” Native Americans did not have resistance to the diseases the Europeans carried? It is estimated that 90% to 95% of the Native American populations died of diseases brought over from Europe in those early years. Europeans also came with much more advanced and lethal weapons. Europeans also had a different concept of “land ownership”, specifically “private” land ownership than did the Native Americans. The Native Americans didn’t realize at first that the ”rules of the game” that the Europeans were operating under were different than those of Native Americans. As you read the second paragraph of our Land Acknowledgment Statement, you see that it is really an acknowledgment, in a very short summary, of the catastrophic decimation and trauma the Native American civilization experienced with the arrival of the Europeans that “settled” America. Below is the proposed Land Acknowledgement statement to be used by the City of Golden Valley. . Look specifically at the 2nd paragraph. ¶1 We acknowledge and honor the Dakota nation, on whose ancestral lands’ the City of Golden Valley is built, and whose land resources we use. ¶2 We reflect on the forced exile and the codified dispossession of the Dakota peoples, due to actions by the government, traders and land speculators, leading to the Land Cession 289 and the 1851 Treaty of Traverse des Sioux. We further recognize the injustices done by actions taken to suppress, over the following many decades, the Dakota People’s knowledge and practice of their cultural and spiritual heritage. ¶3 We further acknowledge, honor and respect their continuing existence as a sovereign nation here in the land they call Mni Sota Makoce. (Article 3) Golden Valley – What happened to people from the Dakota Nation when they gave up their land? The Dakota People, as well as other Native American tribes, in spite of the hardships they have endured, continue to live in Minnesota and throughout the United States. They are recognized by Treaty as Sovereign Nations within the United States. They are working to recover the use of their native languages, as well as the observance and rekindling of their individual cultures. All while participating as full citizens of the United States and participating in all aspects of life in America. Native American cultures contribute to the great cultural diversity found in the United State, helping to create a uniquely creative nation. The United States is a nation that draws on many strands of culture to build a pluralistic society. 0.6% of the population in Golden Valley are Native Americans. We in Golden Valley acknowledge, through this Land Acknowledgment Statement the fact that the land the City now occupy was once the land of the Dakota People. Below is the proposed Land Acknowledgement statement to be used by the City of Golden Valley. Look specifically at the 3rd paragraph. ¶1 We acknowledge and honor the Dakota nation, on whose ancestral lands’ the City of Golden Valley is built, and whose land resources we use. ¶2 We reflect on the forced exile and the codified dispossession of the Dakota peoples, due to actions by the government, traders and land speculators, leading to the Land Cession 289 and the 1851 Treaty of Traverse des Sioux. We further recognize the injustices done by actions taken to suppress, over the following many decades, the Dakota People’s knowledge and practice of their cultural and spiritual heritage. ¶3 We further acknowledge, honor and respect their continuing existence as a sovereign nation here in the land they call Mni Sota Makoce. (Article 4) Is a Verbal and Written ”Land Acknowledgment Statement” Enough? The answer is no. The Dakota people need to be recognized for who they are now, what they are doing, the barriers they are facing, and the contributions they are making to society. Part of the “Land Acknowledgment” project includes an Action Plan of activities that moves us forward toward the realization of the intent of the Land Acknowledgement Statement. (Article 5) Who Discovered America? The indigenous people discovered America 15,000 to maybe 20,000 years ago. There is evidence that they came across the Bering Land Bridge between Siberia and Alaska, when ocean levels were much lower. People then migrated south and east to settle all of America. There is proof that about 500 years ago Vikings had a presence on the Canadian Island of Newfoundland. Columbus “discovered” a populated America in 1492 while he was looking for a shorter route to China. (Article 6) What was the land of Golden Valley like when the Settlers first arrived? People from the Dakota Tribe hunted on the land now occupied by the City of Golden Valley. They lived by Medicine Lake. The City of Golden Valley is part of the Bassett Creek Watershed. Since many of us have sump pumps to prevent water from flooding our basements, we know that we live on what was once wetlands. For that reason, the Dakota people did not put their actual dwellings on the land where the City is located. (Article 7) Minnesota – Tribes and locations In Minnesota, there are seven Anishinaabe (Chippewa, Ojibwe) reservations and four Dakota (Sioux) communities. Find links to the web sites of those communities that have web sites. Also included are links to other valuable resources. The 4 small round circles toward the bottom of the map are Dakota land. Dakota Nation in Minnesota Before the treaty of 1851 (Hennepin Co. Library https://www.hclib.org/programs/books-reading/mary-ann-key-book-club • An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States for Young People • by Roxane Dunbar-Ortiz, adapted by Debbie Reese and Jean Mendoza • About the book • In this adaptation of Roxanne Dunbar-Oritz’s An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States (2014), co-writers Debbie Reese and Jean Mendoza reframe U.S. history from an Indigenous perspective in a way that is accessible, packed with facts and will have readers thinking critically from start to finish. • “In spite of all that was done to them, Indigenous people are still here. It is breathtaking, but no miracle, that they have survived as peoples. This is a history of the United States.” From An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States for Young People. Mary Ann Key Book Club: A Conversation With Debbie Reese Tuesday, April 19, 7-8:30 p.m. Join the Mary Ann Key Book Club for an online event featuring Debbie Reese, co-author of our spring 2022 book club selection An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States for Young People. The author will be joined in conversation by Star Tribune columnist and book club partner Myron Medcalf. Collaborator: Star Tribune. Sponsor: Friends of the Hennepin County Library. Register for this live online event. Mary Ann Key Book Club Discussions Thursday, April 28, 10-11:30 a.m. Tuesday, May 10, 7-8:30 p.m. Join our discussion of An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States for Young People, adapted by Debbie Reese and Jean Mendoza. Please register for only one small group discussion program. Collaborator: Star Tribune. Sponsor: Friends of the Hennepin County Library. Learn more and register for one of the online discussions. Mary Ann Key Book Club: A Community Discussion of An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States for Young People Thursday, May 12, 7-8:30 p.m. Join columnist Myron Medcalf and moderator Ramona Kitto Stately in an online conversation with Native American community leaders Sharon Day, Marlena Myles, Dr. Katie Phillips and Pearl Walker-Swaney. Panelists will discuss An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States for Young People. Collaborator: Star Tribune. Sponsor: Friends of the Hennepin County Library. Register for this live online event. Language Facts) Minnesota – A Dakota Indian word “meaning “white water”. Winnetka - The name is thought to be derived from a Native American word meaning “beautiful land.” Mississippi - French rendering of an Algonquian name (French missionaries first penetrated the river valley in its upper reaches) meaning "big river;" compare Ojibwa mshi- "big," ziibi "river." Minnehaha -Mni ḣa ḣa - waterfall, or curling waters; (https://healingmnstories.wordpress.com/2016/01/31/whats-in-a-name-part-1-minnesota- counties-with-indigenous-names/) Susana Alcala Wood, City Attorney Jorge Oseguera, City Auditor Mindy Cuppy, City Clerk Howard Chan, City Manager John Colville, City Treasurer City Council Report 915 I Street, 1st Floor Sacramento, CA 95814 www.cityofsacramento.org File ID: 2021-01420 December 14, 2021 Discussion Item 33 Title: Adopt an Official City of Sacramento Land Acknowledgement Location: Citywide Recommendation: Adopt a Resolution establishing an official City of Sacramento Land Acknowledgment to be read aloud at the beginning of every meeting of the Sacramento City Council and its subsidiary committees, boards, and bodies (i.e., City Council standing committees, City Council ad hoc committees, and City of Sacramento boards, commissions, and committees), as well as the Financing Authority, Housing Authority, Public Financing Authority, and Redevelopment Agency Successor Agency. Contact: Kelly F. Rivas, Chief of Staff, (916) 808-5300, Office of Mayor Darrell Steinberg Presenters: Kelly Fong Rivas, Chief of Staff, Office of Mayor Darrell Steinberg; Chairman Jesus Tarango, Wilton Rancheria Tribe; Britta Guerrero, Chief Executive Officer, Sacramento Native American Health Center. Attachments: 1-Description/Analysis 2-Sacramento Native American Health Center Land Acknowledgment Background 3-Resolutin (Ceremonial) 4-Resolution (City) 5-City of Sacramento Land Acknowledgment Statement Page 1 of 8 File ID: 2021-01420 Discussion Item 33 December 14, 2021 powered by Legistar™ City of Sacramento Description/Analysis Issue Detail: A land acknowledgment is a formal statement, a public recognition, of the Indigenous Peoples who have been dispossessed and displaced from their ancestral homelands and territories due to a variety of colonial and historical reasons. This statement acknowledges that an organization, a city, a park, or any other structure was built, and operates, on Indigenous Peoples’ ancestral homelands. As articulated by Mayor Steinberg and members of the Racial Equity Ad Hoc Committee at its October 6, 2021 meeting, it is important for the City of Sacramento to acknowledge, understand, and apologize for the City’s role in the perpetuation of America’s racial harm. In this vein, it is important to understand the long-standing history that has brought the City of Sacramento to this land, and to seek to understand our place within that history. Land Acknowledgements are not about placing blame, they are the first step towards building a more inclusive future that eliminates the erasure of Indigenous Peoples’ voices, lives, and history. To recognize the land is an expression of gratitude and appreciation to those whose territory we reside on. During the first Racial Equity Ad Hoc Committee meeting on October 6, 2021, Councilmember Vang requested adopting a Land Acknowledgement at the beginning of every Racial Ad Hoc Committee meeting and suggested having Britta Guerrero, CEO of the Sacramento Native American Health Center (SNAHC), along with the Chairman of the Wilton Rancheria Tribe, Jesus Tarango, lead the way with a presentation on the importance of a Land Acknowledgement at the next Racial Equity Ad Hoc Committee meeting. On October 12, 2021, Britta Guerrero, and Chairman Tarango participated in a special presentation at City Council, recognizing Indigenous Peoples’ Day at the request of Councilmember Valenzuela. They returned to the ad hoc committee on October 26, 2021, for another presentation and dialogue on the development and adoption of a Land Acknowledgement. Ensuring that a Land Acknowledgement is presented at official City council meetings furthers council’s stated commitment towards advancing racial equity by fostering an environment that is aware and actively working towards integrating Indigenous People and their history of local lands into decision-making processes. In doing so, the City will be acknowledging the oppressive systems Indigenous people have experienced and continue to experience and will bring us in solidarity to break down those barriers and create a culture that celebrates and protects the heritage of Indigenous Peoples. Policy Considerations: Council has directed staff to include consideration of racial equity in future policy and budget decisions. Adopting a formal citywide policy to include a Land Acknowledgement statement at the beginning of all City Council, council standing committee, Page 2 of 8 File ID: 2021-01420 Discussion Item 33 December 14, 2021 powered by Legistar™ City of Sacramento ad hoc committee, and board and commission meetings is a critical step forward for the City of Sacramento to acknowledge and honor the original Indigenous People of the land where City Hall and the City of Sacramento are located. Economic Impacts: None. Environmental Considerations: This action is not subject to CEQA because it is an administrative activity that will not result in direct or indirect physical changes in the environment, and it relates to government fiscal activities that do not involve any commitment to any specific project that may result in a potentially significant physical impact on the environment. (CEQA Guidelines § 15378(a), (b)(2), (b)(4) and (b)(5)). Sustainability: Not applicable. Commission/Committee Action: On October 26, 2021, the Racial Equity Ad Hoc Committee passed a motion: 1) adopting a Land Acknowledgement at the beginning of every Racial Equity Ad Hoc Committee meeting; and 2) forwarding the presentation to the full City Council for consideration of the adoption of a Land Acknowledgement statement at the beginning of every meeting of the Sacramento City Council and its subsidiary committees, boards, and bodies (i.e., City Council standing committees, City Council ad hoc committees, and City of Sacramento boards, commissions, and committees), as well as the Financing Authority, Housing Authority, Public Financing Authority, and Redevelopment Agency Successor Agency. Rationale for Recommendation: Adopting a policy for a Land Acknowledgement all meetings of the City Council, standing committees, ad hoc committees, boards, and commissions is in alignment with the City Council’s stated commitment to advancing racial equity. Financial Considerations: Not applicable. Local Business Enterprise (LBE): Not applicable. Page 3 of 8 Land Acknowledgment The history of the Sacramento area, and the people, is rich in heritage, culture and tradition. This area was, and still is, the Tribal land of the Nisenan people. Sacramento was a gathering place for many local Tribes who have lived throughout the central valley and the foothills for generations and were the original stewards of this land. We would like to acknowledge the Southern Maidu people to the North, the Valley and Plains Miwok/ Me-Wuk Peoples to the south of the American River, and the Patwin Wintun Peoples to the west of the Sacramento River. We would also like to honor the Wilton Rancheria, the only federally recognized tribe in Sacramento County. We acknowledge that we are standing on the tribal lands of Sacramento’s Indigenous people. Why Land Acknowledgment? Today, we recognize that change can only occur in the context of truthfulness, transparency, and reconciliation around systems that have oppressed and excluded Indigenous people. We believe that education can shift historically oppressive practices to build a more inclusive and socially conscious community and society. One of the steps in this process includes asking our partners, supporters and allies to include an Indigenous Peoples land acknowledgment at every opportunity. This statement recognizes that Sacramento is the ancestral homeland of the Nisenan, Maidu, Miwok and Me-Wuk peoples, who are the Indigenous Peoples of this land, and have lived here since time immemorial. What is the purpose of a land acknowledgment? A land acknowledgment is a formal statement, a public recognition, of the Indigenous Peoples who have been dispossessed and displaced from their ancestral homelands and territories due to a variety of colonial and historical reasons. This statement acknowledges that an organization, a city, a park, or any other structure was built, and operates, on Indigenous Peoples’ ancestral homelands. Why are land acknowledgments important? Land acknowledgments are not about placing blame. These statements are the first step towards building a more inclusive future where we eliminate the ongoing erasure of Indigenous Peoples’ voices, lives, and history. Land acknowledgments can be an entry point and pathway for education. Our land acknowledgment statement may be your first experience hearing about the Indigenous Peoples in the area, which provides an opportunity to seed the path for learning and for respect to blossom and grow. More Resources About Land Acknowledgments: Guide to Indigenous Land and Territorial Acknowledgements for Cultural Institutions Interactive Map and Guide to Territory Acknowledgements Honor Native Land, A Guide and Call to Action – U.S. Department of Arts and Culture Why Land Acknowledgments Matter Page 4 of 8 City of Sacramento Land Acknowledgment WHEREAS, a Land Acknowledgement is a formal statement, a public recognition, of the Indigenous Peoples who have been dispossessed and displaced from their ancestral homelands and territories due to a variety of colonial and historical reasons, WHEREAS, this formal statement acknowledges that the City of Sacramento, its parks, and any other infrastructure was built, and operates, on Indigenous Peoples’ ancestral homelands, WHEREAS, a Land Acknowledgement recognizes the unique and enduring relationship that exists between Indigenous Peoples and their traditional territories and to recognize the land is an expression of gratitude and appreciation to those whose stolen territory we reside on, WHEREAS, a Land Acknowledgement re-centers Indigenous perspectives and aims to celebrate and honor the past, present, and futures of Native peoples and acknowledges the harmful legacy of colonialism, which has devastated Indigenous communities historically and continues to negatively impact them today, WHEREAS, Native Americans are descendants of the Indigenous people who were the original inhabitants of this continent, and Sacramento is the home of the Nisenan people, Southern Maidu, Valley and Plains Miwok, Patwin Wintun peoples, and the people of the Wilton Rancheria, Sacramento’s only Federally recognized Tribe, WHEREAS, these local tribes possessed an incredible understanding of the resources that were available to them and have passed this knowledge down from generation to generation, ensuring it remains very much a part of who they are today, WHEREAS, Sacramento’s Native Community makes up 1.5% of the population and continues to provide positive impacts in the region through the leadership and the strength of the Wilton Rancheria, and Native-led organizations like the Sacramento Native American Health Center who not only provide COVID-19 resources for the whole community but also provide a culturally competent, holistic, and patient-centered continuum of care, WHEREAS, reading a Land Acknowledgement before the Pledge of Allegiance is an active practice of acknowledging our nation’s foundational history of colonial harm to the Indigenous Peoples whose lands we reside on, NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, by the Mayor and the City Council of the City of Sacramento that we do hereby establish a City of Sacramento Land Acknowledgment for the beginning of every Sacramento City Council, its subsidiary committees, boards, and bodies (i.e. City Council Standing Committees, City Council Ad Hoc Committees, and City of Sacramento Boards, Commissions, and Committees) as well as the Financing Authority, Housing Authority, Public Financing Authority, and Redevelopment Agency Successor Agency. ISSUED: This XX Day of XX 2021. Page 5 of 8 RESOLUTION NO. 2021- Adopted by the Sacramento City Council City of Sacramento Land Acknowledgment BACKGROUND: A. A Land Acknowledgement is a formal statement, a public recognition, of the Indigenous Peoples who have been dispossessed and displaced from their ancestral homelands and territories due to a variety of colonial and historical reasons. B. This formal statement acknowledges that the City of Sacramento, its parks, and any other infrastructure was built, and operates, on Indigenous Peoples’ ancestral homelands. C. A Land Acknowledgement recognizes the unique and enduring relationship that exists between Indigenous Peoples and their traditional territories and to recognize the land is an expression of gratitude and appreciation to those whose stolen territory we reside on. D. A Land Acknowledgement re-centers Indigenous perspectives and aims to celebrate and honor the past, present, and futures of Native peoples and acknowledges the harmful legacy of colonialism, which has devastated Indigenous communities historically and continues to negatively impact them today, E. Native Americans are descendants of the Indigenous people who were the original inhabitants of this continent, and Sacramento is the home of the Nisenan people, Southern Maidu, Valley and Plains Miwok, Patwin Wintun peoples, and the people of the Wilton Rancheria, Sacramento’s only Federally recognized Tribe, F. These local tribes possessed an incredible understanding of the resources that were available to them and have passed this knowledge down from generation to generation, ensuring it remains very much a part of who they are today, G. Sacramento’s Native Community makes up 1.5% of the population and continues to provide positive impacts in the region through the leadership and the strength of the Wilton Rancheria, and Native-led organizations like the Sacramento Native American Health Center who not only provide COVID-19 resources for the whole community but also provide a culturally competent, holistic, and patient-centered continuum of care. Page 6 of 8 H. Reading a Land Acknowledgement before the Pledge of Allegiance is an active practice of acknowledging our nation’s foundational history of colonial harm to the Indigenous Peoples whose lands we reside on. BASED ON THE FACTS SET FORTH IN THE RECITALS, THE CITY COUNCIL RESOLVES AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. A City of Sacramento Land Acknowledgment (attached as Exhibit A) is to be read aloud at the beginning of every meeting of the Sacramento City Council and its subsidiary committees, boards, and bodies (i.e., City Council standing committees, City Council ad hoc committees, and City of Sacramento boards, commissions, and committees), as well as the Financing Authority, Housing Authority, Public Financing Authority, and Redevelopment Agency Successor Agency. Exhibit A: City of Sacramento Land Acknowledgement Page 7 of 8 City of Sacramento Land Acknowledgement Please rise for the opening acknowledgements in honor of Sacramento’s Indigenous People and Tribal Lands. To the original people of this land. The Nisenan people, The Southern Maidu, Valley and Plains Miwok, Patwin Wintun peoples, and the people of the Wilton Rancheria, Sacramento’s only Federally recognized Tribe. May we acknowledge and honor the Native people who came before us and still walk beside us today on these ancestral lands by choosing to gather together today in the active practice of acknowledgement and appreciation for Sacramento’s Indigenous People’s history, contributions, and lives. Thank you. Please remain standing for the Pledge of Allegiance. I pledge allegiance, to the flag Of the United States of America And to the Republic, for which it stands, One Nation, under God, Indivisible with liberty and justice for all. Page 8 of 8 RESOLUTION NO. 20 – RESOLUTION ADOPTING AN OFFICIAL CITY OF GOLDEN VALLEY LAND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT WHEREAS, a Land Acknowledgment is a formal statement, a public recognition, of the Indigenous Peoples who have been dispossessed and displaced from their ancestral homelands and territories due to a variety of colonial and historical reasons, WHEREAS, this formal statement acknowledges that the City of Golden Valley, its parks, and any other infrastructure was built, and operates, on Indigenous Peoples’ ancestral homelands WHEREAS, a Land Acknowledgement recognizes the unique and enduring relationship that exists between Indigenous Peoples and their traditional territories and to recognize the land is an expression of gratitude and appreciation to those whose stolen territory we reside on, WHEREAS, the City of Golden Valley and surrounding area is home to the Dakota People WHEREAS, the Dakota people, original inhabitants of this land were subject to forced exile and codified dispossession of the land due to actions of the government, traders and land speculators as evidenced by the Land Cession 289 and 1851 Treat of Traverse des Sioux, WHEREAS, Mni Sota Makoce is home to twelve federally recognized tribes and other sovereign nations made up of the Dakota people and other Indigenous Peoples, WHEREAS, the City of Golden Valley’s Native community makes up 0.6 percent of its population, over 1,300 people, and continues to provide positive impacts in the region through culturally sustaining and rejuvenating activities, WHEREAS, a Land Acknowledgement re-centers Indigenous perspectives and aims to celebrate and honor the past, present, and futures of Native peoples and acknowledges the harmful legacy of colonialism, which has devastated Indigenous communities historically and continues to negatively impact them today, WHEREAS, the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Commission developed an action plan to acknowledge, educate and appreciate Minnesota Indigenous Peoples through their work plan to support Golden Valley’s Native Community, WHEREAS, reading a Land Acknowledgement before the Pledge of Allegiance is an active practice of acknowledging our nation’s foundational history of colonial harm to the Indigenous Peoples whose lands we reside on, WHEREAS BE IT RESOLVED by the City Council of the City of Golden Valley that: 1. The City of Golden Valley establishes a Land Acknowledgement for the beginning of every Golden Valley City Council, _________________, ______________, _______________, meeting 2. The Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Commission is directed to integrate action plan items into its work plan annually 3. The Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Commission is directed to research the adoption of Indigenous Peoples’ Day the second Monday of October. Adopted by the City Council of Golden Valley, Minnesota this 17th day of May 2022. _____________________________ Shepard M. Harris, Mayor ATTEST: _____________________________ Theresa J. Schyma, City Clerk Inclusive Holiday & Cultural Events Calendar and Policy Subgroup Subgroup Members: Eric, Kiarra, Rob, and Theresa Recommendations 1. Inclusive Holiday Calendar for should be uploaded to the Outlook calendars of all employees • This calendar will help staff when planning events, open houses, and Council/Commission meetings • Calendar will also note which holidays could include fasting so staff can take that into account as well 2. Create awareness amongst staff and the community about holidays and cultural events that are not solely based on a white, Christian calendar • Have the Communications team prepare website and social media news stories each month about the inclusive calendar observances occurring that month and also any themes that align with City goals (e.g. Fair Housing Month, Women’s History Month, etc.) • Consider asking the DEIC to assist in this effort by gathering personal stories which can have an impact on community understanding • Staff will prepare Council proclamations regarding monthly designations that align with City goals 3. Implement an employee ‘DEI Flex Time/Inclusive Calendar Policy’ for staff Draft language was created as a starting point: To honor and recognize the diversity of our team, we should consider adding an element to our paid time off policy: DEI floating holidays. In addition to the Council-approved holidays where City administrative offices are closed, every full-time employee will receives two additional floating holidays that they can use as outlined by our new inclusive calendar policy: Golden Valley is strongest when individuals feel comfortable embracing their full selves at work, which means we need to create space to honor and recognize holidays, traditions, and observances that may fall outside our standard holiday calendar. Options for DEI floating holidays include: Chinese New Year, Holi, Passover, Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, Juneteenth, Indigenous People’s Day, National Coming Out Day, Diwali, Eid al-Fitr, Hanukkah, and Kwanzaa. DEI floating holidays should be used as close as possible to the official observance but must be used within one week of the official date. DEI floating holidays require advance notice but are not subject to approval like vacation. Notice should be given as soon as possible, ideally at least a month in advance, and must be given at least two weeks ahead of the observance. 4. Add Juneteenth to the annual list of City holidays that are observed with offices closing Potential Next Steps 1. Send these recommendations to the DEIC for review and input 2. Subgroup and Kiarra will meet again to discuss making any necessary changes to the recommendations 3. Present recommendations to M-Team 4. Discuss specifics of implementation with IT and HR 5. Present recommended policy and calendar to the City Council REGULAR MEETING MINUTES Call to Order Chair Allen called the meeting to order at 5:41 pm. Roll Call Commissioners in person: Ruth Paradise, Sheri Hixon, Drew Jones Commissions virtual: Joelle Allen, Ajani Woodson, Chris Mitchell Commissioners absent: Teresa Sit, Thomas Huling, Melissa Johnson Staff present: Kiarra Zackery, Equity and Inclusion Manager Cheryl Weiler, Communications Director Approval of January 25, 2022 and February 22, 2022 minutes MOTION by Commissioner Paradise for the approval of the minutes. Seconded by Commissioner Mitchell. Motion carried. Land Acknowledgement Update Equity and Inclusion manager, Kiarra Zackery leads the discussion by announcing the collaboration between her, the land acknowledgement subcommittee, and the City’s Communication staff. Commission Paradise begins to share ideas revolving publishing, advertising, and the benefits of informing the public the process of developing the land acknowledgement. The Commission starts to discuss strategic planning and better ways to broaden and expand their advertisement for upcoming events. Discussion such as timeline and utilizing different resources were brought up. New Commissioner Introductions and Oath Commissioner Drew Jones was introduced and sworn in as the new youth Commissioner. During this time, each Commissioner introduced themselves to Drew. Work plan development Chair Allen discusses her progress with the 2022 work plan DEIC will present in front of Council. She adds the work plan highly focuses on ideas and roles for collaborating with other Commissions in Golden Valley. March 22, 2022 – 5:30 pm Council Conference Room Golden Valley City Hall 7800 Golden Valley Road City of Golden Valley Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Commission Regular Meeting March 22, 2022 – 5:30 pm 2 Community Engagement Updates A. Q2 BAEGV Commissioner Mitchell talks about the event being focused on explaining Environmental Justice and the importance of it within the City. Logistics and advertising for the event were briefly discussed. B. Allianz Equity and Inclusion Manager, Zackery asks the Commission to start brainstorming on dates they would like to host the lunch and learn event at Allianz Adjourn MOTION by Chair Mitchell to adjourn at 6:51pm. Seconded by Hixon. Motion carried. __________________________ Date _________________________________ Kiarra Zackery, Equity and Inclusion Manager _____________________________ Date _________________________________ Joelle Allen, Chair